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Articles > Search results for: "rook"


  • Pandolfini's Puzzler #39 - The Great Pawn Chain of Being

    Professor: Good day, class. It’s wonderful to see you. Zephyr and Lucian: It’s wonderful to see you, too, Professor. Professor: As different as the two of you are, you always seem so connected. Lucian: You mean like emotionally awar... | Read More

  • When Castles Attack

         There are certain rare actions in chess that elicit an almost emotional response - windmills, smothered mates, advantageous underpromotions and what I want to include here:  Checkmate by Castling.      This type of mate is so ra... | Read More

  • Kolisch: Unknown Tactical Monster

    (I want to thank chess.com’s finest chess historian, batgirl, for articles shared, the photos you see in this article, and her very useful feedback when I asked her about Kolisch. If you don’t follow her blogs and articles you are foolishly de... | Read More

  • Pandolfini's Puzzler #38 - Nine Lives

    Professor: Good afternoon, class. I hope this past week has been spectacular. Zephyr: It was for me. I got to go to a concert. I heard Beethoven’s "Symphony No. 9". It was glorious. Professor: The Ninth Symphony! I wish I could have been ... | Read More

  • Stalemate

    S T A L E M A T E _______________________________________________________      The existing rule has this in its favour, that it appeals strongly to the sporting instincts of mankind; and the last chance which it affords to a player who ap... | Read More

  • Readers’ Games, Questions and Comments, Part 3

    Today we’ll look at three games and one comment. Each entry has important instructive points that are well worth pondering. We’ll start with the comment, alluding to my article, You Have It He Doesn’t! Part 1, which was all about... | Read More

  • Pandolfini's Puzzler #37 - Which Piece Are You?

    Professor: Good afternoon, class. Just seeing your smiling faces makes my day. Zephyr: It makes your day? That sounds like a quote from an old Dirty Harry movie. Lucian: Why? Does Clint Eastwood play chess in those movies? Professor: I d... | Read More

  • The Art of Doing Nothing, Part Four

    In parts one, two, and three of this article, I described the unusual concept of "doing nothing." In this article we'll discuss when it is appropriate to use this idea. Once upon a time, I showed my game vs. Nakamura as an example of "doing noth... | Read More

  • Pandolfini's Puzzler #36 - April Fool's Day: Queen vs. Pawn

    Professor: Hello, Class. Happy April Fool’s Day! Lucian: Professor, April Fool’s Day has come and gone. It was three days ago. Zephyr: I prefer to think of April 1 as being Rachmaninoff’s birthday. Lucian: I don’t know if I’d... | Read More

  • A Week in Chicago, Part 1

    I recently participated in an IM norm tournament in Chicago. This was an unusual kind of tournament for me - and you might find it strange that a tournament for international master norms would have grandmasters. Most of the tournaments in which I... | Read More

  • Schrödinger's Chess Puzzle

    Warning - the article you are about to read might produce a variety of symptoms, including lightheadedness, altered vision, eye or face twitching, jerking or shaking of arms or legs, disorientation, confusion, or momentary loss of awareness.  **... | Read More

  • Grandmasters also can make mistakes!

    Some peoples think, grandmasters can't make mistakes. Today I want to say a very important rule: Grandmasters also can make mistakes! Not only 2200-2300 players miss for example a rook. This thing I want to tell in some diagrams. After this unbe... | Read More

  • Expertise in Chess Players

    Learning and mastery of a skill is a complicated process, especially when the endeavor involves the mind. For reasons along this line, psychologists have studied how expert chess players excel. The famous psychologist Alfred Binet once stated, “... | Read More

  • The Art of the Two Bishops

    Imagining that the pieces have stable values which are written in stone is an oversimplification of chess. One of the ways to become a better player is to develop a more subtle understanding of the relative values of pieces. Often a piece gains ... | Read More

  • The Art of Setting Traps

    Most tournament players scoff at the notion of Coffeehouse Chess. Even so, some of the most famous brilliancies in chess history were produced under dubious, non-tournament circumstances: The Immortal Game (Anderssen-Kieseritzky) was played at the... | Read More

  • Riding the Winds of Fashion, Part 2

    In Part One of Riding The Winds Of Fashion, I talked about the Hübner Variation of the Nimzo-Indian and how, at one time, it was one of the most fashionable openings in the world. In the main example (Bruce Leverett – Silman, National O... | Read More

  • Positional Combinations

    I will begin by affirming that the title of this article is deliberately oxymoronic. According to David Hooper and Kenneth Whyld's The Oxford Companion to Chess (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984), a combination is "a series of forci... | Read More

  • Pandolfini's Puzzler #33 - Knights to Remember

    Professor: Class, how special it is to see you. Zephyr & Lucian: Hello, Professor. We do feel pretty special. Professor: Don’t let it go to your heads, but I’d like to start off with a question, if you don’t mind. Zephyr: I don... | Read More

  • Mysterious GM Moves

    When you hear the word "brilliancy," what comes to mind? A dazzling combination with multiple sacrifices? A captivating tactical melee in which both players display their calculational expertise? Without a doubt, brilliancy has a tactical connotat... | Read More

  • A Chess Player's Best Friend

    Let me start today's article with a little brain teaser. What can every single chess piece (that is king, rook, bishop, knight or pawn) do that a queen can't? You'll find an answer to this question at the end of the article. Today we'll talk abo... | Read More