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Typical Rook Endgames 3 v. 2 on the Same Flank

  • GM dbojkov
  • | May 25, 2012
  • | 6576 views
  • | 26 comments

This is a follow-up to my previous article on defending 4 v 3.
The rook endgame three versus two on the same flank is the little brother of the one which we have already studied. The difference favours the defender as there is one pawn less that in the similar endgame.
These endgames are usually drawn and the defense is relatively easy.
The good things remain good here as well, such as the optimal set-up:
However, thanks to the fact that there are less pawns on the board, the weaker side can also adopt different defensive set-ups.
Even a cramped position should not bother the defender, as long as they can liquidate into an endgame with small number of pawns (one or even two extra pawns for the strong side). These endgames are usually theoretical draws:
The defender's worst nightmare is called a "pawn endgame":
From the sample above one can easily figure out the second main danger. It is the king getting cut off from his pawns. In this case they will either be lost due to the combined efforts of the rook, king and pawns; or the defender will have to allow a pawn endgame:

Comments


  • 18 months ago

    GM dbojkov

    Thank you for the nice words. Yes, I do and I will forwrd your request to the  admins :)

  • 18 months ago

    funnylady

    Thank you for these helpful Rook ending articles.  I hope you consider doing a Rook Endings course for Chess Mentor.  I like your explanations a lot.

  • 22 months ago

    GM dbojkov

    Correct!

  • 22 months ago

    duniel

    I see, without the g6 pawn, this position would be drawn, but now white can play

  • 22 months ago

    GM dbojkov

    judope20 Shouldering is a typical technique in which you are trying to prevent the activation of the opponent's king with your own one. Many people call it also bodycheck (like it is done in the hocky).

  • 22 months ago

    GM dbojkov

    This is a very good question, duniel! Normally these positions are also a draw and this is one of the defensive methods.

    However, note- if the strong side manages to force your rook to the back rank (which with one g pawn will be a draw) here the two pawns will win. There is a way for the strong side to sac a pawn but liquidate into a won king and pawn endgame.

    The bottom line- there is no need for you to do it here!

  • 22 months ago

    duniel

    Dear Mr. Bojkov, I wonder wether in the first example back can draw by 52...g5+ when after 53. fxg5 Ra6+! he sets a sort of Phillidor position. Does white's second pawn make a difference? It seems to me that white cannot make progress.

  • 23 months ago

    night_queen

    i am not good in endgames..so this would be helpful..

  • 23 months ago

    juliandp

    GM Bojkov:

    Can you tell me please what means the term "shouldering"? You used it in your comments of rook endgames 3 vs 2... Thanks!

  • 23 months ago

    GM dbojkov

    Ludov, I think I did, but might have missed some evaluations. Thanks for making me know!

  • 23 months ago

    Uknighted72

    Good stuff

  • 23 months ago

    Ludov

    Very good, deep and instructive, please continue !!

    But one remark : sometimes, I am not sure about the assessment of final positions given in braket. Could you mark them +/-, = ... Thanks

  • 23 months ago

    Estragon

    Excellent - thank you.

     

    Ivanchuk is a monster in the endings.  How many times in his 25+ years in top competition has he been beaten in the endgame?

  • 23 months ago

    MrMars

    last game last annotation is funny.

  • 23 months ago

    Kinn72

    Thanks, the analysis is as good as studying an endgame manual.

  • 23 months ago

    Rook98

    i have a youtube channel if you want you can check it out http://www.youtube.com/user/andrewchessruff?ob=0 this could be another learning tool if you like the videos

  • 23 months ago

    GM dbojkov

    Yes, tablebases show a lot of errors even on top GM level. However these solutions are not always helping the human understand the defensive method which is clearly calculated by the machine). 

    Thanks for your information!

  • 23 months ago

    TBentley

    According to tablebases, in the last example, only 58. Rd4 draws:

    Sidelines are equally good.

    Of course a player such as me would probably not be able to win, unless the opponent plays poorly (which is not unlikely).

    Also 66...Rd6 or Rd2 would have theoretically won. (66. Ke2, Rb8, Rc8, Rg8+, Rh8, or Ra7 draw)

    72. Re7+ was the only theoretical draw, 72...Rd2+ would have theoretically won.

    73. Re8+ and Ra4+ were theoretical draws, 73...Rb2+ would have theoretically won.

  • 23 months ago

    schack_2

    Quite good.  You might also want to have a look at the Endgames section of the forum at chesspub.com, where a couple of members are doing some very advanced analysis of similar rook and pawn endings.

  • 23 months ago

    GM dbojkov

    I definitely will as long as I have such a positive support!

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