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Fire in the Mailbox

  • GM Gserper
  • | Aug 19, 2012
  • | 10039 views
  • | 48 comments

I receive a lot of messages from fellow chess.com members. Sometimes I am frightened when I open my mailbox since I know very well that I won't be able to reply to many of them. There are requests like "I am an attacking player, what opening should I play as White and what openings should I play as Black against 1.e4 and 1.d4."  make me wonder: did the sender expect some superficial advice like " Play King's Gambit for White, and Najdorf Sicilian for Black against 1.e4 and the King's Indian defense against 1.d4"? Or were they asking me to devise a complete opening repertoire, something that takes tons of time?  As a rule I answer questions like this by referring to my series "Openings for Tactical Players". You can find them on chess.com and pick the opening that appeals to you the most.

But sometimes I get questions that are impossible to answer, unless I invest a lot of time.  When I get a game and a request to review it then what should I do? My advice is to send requests like this to Mr. Silman. In his weekly column he deals exactly with this kind of questions and I am sure you'll enjoy his instructional and witty writing. 

Fortunately, recently I got two messages that I enjoyed a lot. Both of them were regarding my hit parade in this article: http://www.chess.com/article/view/positional-rxe6-sacrifice-part-two

 One of them was from IM David Pruess (dpruess on chess.com).  He mentioned a game with a Rxe6 sacrifice that I had never seen.  You must see this gem to understand the mix of the feelings I had after playing through the game:



From one side I was ashamed, because how could I not know such a beautiful game, especially one where the great Anatoly Karpov was completely annihilated? Being a nice person, David tried to comfort me that it was just a blitz game and that no one knows all the games.  True, and yet to miss such a beauty was almost a crime on my part.  Fortunately the joy of playing through the game far outweighed anything else.  Of course if I knew this game my hit parade would have been different and Mikhail "The Magician" Tal would easily be the winner. 

The second message that I enjoyed came from FM  Kostya Kavutskiy (hellokostya).  He sent me a game that I knew very well, but somehow just forgot to include into my article. Here I offer the game as three exercises for you to compare your attacking skills to Tal's main apprentice - GM Shirov.

It looks like White completely dominates in the center, doesn't he?

How should Black increase his initiative?
Now finish Black's powerful attack in style!
Having two hot attacks like these sent to me (and considering the title of Shirov's book "Fire on Board") I felt like my whole mailbox was on fire. But these are exactly the kind of messages that I enjoy and appreciate.  Thank you guys!

Comments


  • 20 months ago

    Chess_Lover11

    INcredible games!

  • 20 months ago

    hypernovae86

    in the Tal-Karpov game what if 24.Nf6 instead of 24.Ng3? That looks efective too.

  • 20 months ago

    Eternity_08

    Wonderful! Smile

  • 20 months ago

    Lawdoginator

    Shirov is amazing. 

  • 20 months ago

    Sutirtha11

    Awesome games

  • 20 months ago

    feygooner

    In the Tal-Karpov game, what would have happened if Black had taken the h pawn? If he'd played 21...dxc3 for example.

  • 20 months ago

    RyanMurphy5

    Wow! Two great attacking examples.  Thank you for sharing.  I'll add them to my collection for further study.

  • 20 months ago

    AndyAlcott

    The Tal/Karpov game was fantastic.

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