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Isolani strategy: Striving for a better Endgame by Simplification

  • Heinrich_24
  • | Apr 12, 2013
  • | 5190 views
  • | 13 comments


Today I will show a typical Isolani-game, when  there is no real compensation for the Isolani. It will go slowly downwards with the position.

Compensation is the keyword when playing with the Isolani. Otherwise the opponent, as Lasker in the following example, will probably go for simplification to reach  a better endgame cause of the weak Isolani. So, never become too passive playing with an Isolani!


1. Black went for a better endgame by simplification, White cooperated and missed even drawish 25. Nc5!

Lasker followed the main strategy against the Isolani. He went for simplification and reduced the material to reach a better endgame. Rubinstein played this game strangely tame and passive.  He didn`t search for real compensation, but instead cooperated with Black`s exchange strategy. And doing so, he even  missed 25. Nc5 (good outpost) with a probably drawish endgame. Later Rubinstein said: "I was too fixed on a draw by exchanging pieces!" 



2. Active white king versus (extra) outside passer. The passer was too strong

Realizing that the second weakness on a3 would be deadly, Rubinstein gave it up and activated his king. Although he also got rid of the Isolani it was not enough compensation. The outside passer became the decisive factor and the reason for the domination of Black pieces.




Comments


  • 17 months ago

    fwhoberg

    Very good article I liked how you showed the strenths and weakness of isolated pawns and also how the Black Knight out played the White Bishop  while attacking the  weak White isolated pwans. 

  • 18 months ago

    chessfreak800

    thanks mauerblume for the article it was great

  • 19 months ago

    NelsonChesterfield

    thanks

  • 19 months ago

    Heinrich_24

    Thanks, back for the interest! :-)

  • 19 months ago

    jcm1978

    The point is that winning the f7-pawn is "meaningless" because the knight on f4 protects e-and g -pawn.

    This.  Thanks for the discussion!

  • 19 months ago

    Heinrich_24

    61. Kf6 Kg3 62. Kxf7 Kxh3 63. Kf6 Kxh4 and the g-pawn is running.

    The point is that winning the f7-pawn is "meaningless" because the knight on f4 protects e-and g -pawn.

  • 19 months ago

    jcm1978

    In the original line, what about 61. Kxf7 instead of 61. Ba1?

    Is 61. Kxf7 Kg3 62. Kf6 Kxh4 correct?

  • 19 months ago

    Heinrich_24

    So 59. Kg5 Kf3 60. Kh6 )or you have to move the bishop) Kg3 61. Kh7 Kxh3 62. Kg8 Kxh4 63. Kxf7 Nf4 and the g-pawn is running

  • 19 months ago

    jcm1978

    Thanks for replying, but I meant the situation around move 62 (continuation after White's resignation).  The White king has been on g5 since move 60.  But instead of going directly to f6 to attack the Black pawns, he makes two moves Ba1 and Bc3, which I don't understand.

  • 19 months ago

    Heinrich_24

    You mean 52. ... Nxh3 instead of 52. ... Nh5. Well, the knight would be in a "prison"

     



  • 19 months ago

    mark422

    Great as usual

  • 19 months ago

    jcm1978

    Why does White wait for 62...Nxh3+ to finally move the King to f6?

  • 19 months ago

    Sport_Recife

    Thanks for the lecture!

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