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KID Fianchetto: Opening AND Finishing

  • NM GreenLaser
  • | Aug 21, 2010
  • | 6454 views
  • | 14 comments

My last article showed Miguel Najdorf on the white side of the King’s Indian Defense using the Fianchetto Variation. This line has the advantage of placing the bishop on g2 where it can have considerable influence on the center, but does not exert any control over b5, where Black often seeks to push a pawn. In the King’s Indian, Black frequently plays e5 and later f5 to get play on the kingside. Developing a strong attack against White’s king is more difficult in the Fianchetto Variation than in most other lines. For players of the white pieces, this variation is a reasonable alternative to the Classical Variation, the Saemisch Variation, the Four Pawns Attack (which can also be reached from the Modern Benoni), the Averbakh Variation, and other variations. White has all these choices when starting with 1.d4, but if White starts with 1.Nf3 or 1.c4 and plays an early g3 while Black uses a King’s Indian setup, then White can enter the KID Fianchetto Variation by getting in the moves c4, d4, and g3. White can delay d4 and even decide to play d3 instead, which combined with c4 makes for the English Opening, or without c4 makes it a Reti Opening.
In the game selected, White is GM Alexander Fominyh who was born in 1959 in Russia and Black is IM German Kochetkov who was born in 1965 in Belarus. The opening of a chess game is of great interest to those who study chess as is attested to by the great numbers of opening manuals produced each year. In this game, I found the manner White demonstrated in finishing the game very instructive. Fominyh showed how two pieces that were obviously attacking the kingside were decisively aided in controlling squares by a piece far away. Despite being an exchange down, White finished off Black. The fianchettoed bishop loyally stood guard at its opening post and never made another move.
I suggest that readers stop advancing the moves on the board after 26...Rb6 and try to find the method White used to finish the game.

Comments


  • 4 years ago

    Chacku

    Great article. Very helpful.

  • 4 years ago

    leonelcm

    Very good article and very instructive, thanx for sharing...

  • 4 years ago

    NM GreenLaser

    truthteller908, thanks for following what I said and for the suggestion. I checked my articles. There are a dozen that fit your request. In a few cases, it is hard to see that unless you know which player was considered stronger because there were no ratings yet. Your feeling about the stronger player winning with White is not without a point, but I think it is perhaps an overstatement. For example, when I watched Najdorf playing blitz against a "weaker" player and winning with both colors, another master was telling me that Najdorf was an artist. The fact that the stronger player is the winner should not prevent appreciating how the game is played.

  • 4 years ago

    truthteller908

    Why don't you show a lesson where the stronger player loses to the weaker player thats playing as black. The stronger player playing as white and beating the weaker opponent doesn't really do anything for me.

  • 4 years ago

    NM GreenLaser

    Severe_Snake, this is just one game which was won by the stronger player. That does not mean the King's Indian should be abandoned by players using it. A player should select an opening based on style, prior knowledge, and experience. Then the opponent should be considered. The fact that the stronger player is often the winner can distort our opinion of the opening. I played the King's Indian against Anatoly Karpov in 1998 (not in a simul). He played the Saemisch Variation. After 35 moves, I resigned. Notice, the stronger player won, not necessarily the stronger opening system.

  • 4 years ago

    NM GreenLaser

    cookie3, Re1 has !? appended to it. That could mean it is an interesting move. It also defends e4 against Black's possible b4 which would drive away the knight. a3 would be another way of protecting e4. By keeping the queenside pawns on a2 and b2, White preserves the possibility of a setup of a2 and b3 which keeps Black from using c4 and probably leaves Black's b5 or b4 weak. The a2 and b3 chain also makes a4 possible, although with a2 and b2, simply playing a4 is possible. It may still be possible to imagine a setup with a3 and b4, but the time seems better spent on other moves. A key point with 11.Re1!? is that 11...b4 12.Nd5 looks better for White. The rook on e1 is more useful than the pawn on a3.

  • 4 years ago

    cookie3

    Question:  I use the Barcza system and find myself in many positions similar to position 11; when you gave a !? to whites Re1 to which i agree.  I commonly play 11.) a3.  Would you consider this move too passive?

      Great article; Thanks!

  • 4 years ago

    1wa

    Lonnie..as usual you have the best insights ever. Another good one. Thank you.

  • 4 years ago

    NM GreenLaser

    Thanks, readers. I was wondering if anyone noticed what I did not add regarding 28.Ne4. There is a difference between 28.Ne4 and 28.Nh7 that shows up with Black's 28...Qc1+. The difference is that Black wins the knight on h7, but not the knight on e4. White should win with either move, but naturally preferred Ne4. Fominyh was precise to the last move.

  • 4 years ago

    MugglesMan

    Pretty ending.

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