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Korchnoi-Spassky Candidates 1977: French Winawer Part 2

  • NM GreenLaser
  • | Aug 7, 2011
  • | 6151 views
  • | 8 comments

The games of the final Candidates match of 1977 between Viktor Korchnoi and Boris Spassky in which the positional lines of the French Defense, Winawer Variation were played will be shown. These are the games without 7.Qg4. Instead 7.a4 or 7.Nf3 were played in four games. In game 2, Spassky had played 7.Qg4 and lost. In games 4, 6, 8, and 10, Spassky did not play 7.Qg4. In those games, Korchnoi scored two wins and two draws. In game 12, Spassky switched back to 7.Qg4 and won. After that, the Winawer was not played again. In game 14, Spassky offered 1.e4, but Korchnoi responded with 1...e5 and lost. In game 16, Spassky played 1.d4 resulting in a draw. Korchnoi was leading by three points with four games left to play, but lost as White in game 17. In game 18, Spassky began with 1.d4. Korchnoi replied with 1...e6. The French Defense was on the board after 2.e4 d5. Instead of his usual 3.Nc3, Spassky played 3.e5, entering the Advance Variation. Korchnoi won that game and the match, leaving two scheduled games unplayed.

Since four games from the match and five other games played by Korchnoi are shown, a guide to locating the games is presented. The main game is game 4 (1/2-1/2) which features 7.a4 Bd7. The line with 7.Nf3 Bd7 8.dxc5 Qc7 9.Bd3 Ba4 appeared in three games with deviations on move 10. Game 6 (1/2-1/2) had 10.Be3. Game 8 (0-1) had 10.0-0. Game 10 (0-1) used 10.Rb1. In these three games, Korchnoi continued 10...Nd7. After 9.Bd3, instead of 9...Ba4, Korchnoi played 9...Nbc6 against Nunn (1/2-1/2). Other games shown are to be found following the main game. After 7.a4 Qa5 (instead of Bd7) 8.Qd2 Nbc6 Kuijpers lost to Korchnoi. After 7.a4 Bd7 8.Nf3 Qa5, Mnatsakanian tried 9.Qd2 (instead of 9.Bd2) and lost. The main game continued 7.a4 Bd7 8.Nf3 Qa5 9.Bd2 Nbc6 10.Be2 f6 11.c4 Qc7 12.exf6. Instead, Timman played 12.cxd5 and lost. Lenderman did play 12.exf6 gxf6 13.cxd5 Nxd5 as in the main game, but tried 14.dxc5, (instead of 14.c3) and lost.

 

Comments


  • 3 years ago

    karangtarunasemarang

    wow...Smile

  • 3 years ago

    Attack421988

    great ^+^

  • 3 years ago

    glenarreglo

    nm greenlaser thanks very much for the info.

  • 3 years ago

    lizardbill

    I played the French for about 3 or 4 months straight and won often, but black's poor ol' light square bishop always being trapped by black pawns got frustrating. I found the C-K a few years later and mostly I'm able to get the "bad" bishop out and manage to trade it for a N or a B. For me, this is much better: I'd much rather trade off a potentially impotent piece (especially if I can pin the N @ f3 to the Q). Everyone has their preferences.

    In this article, I found cramming all of these games onto one analysis board too dense, perhaps the author could have made 3 or 4  boards and only put 1 or 2 games on each.

  • 3 years ago

    NM GreenLaser

    glenarreglo, it may be that you should try to get more free piece play. You can be choked in any opening if you play too passively. In the French Defense you may be late in playing the important pawn break c5. A pawn break helps to get more space for your pieces. If White play 3.e5, Black can open the game with c5 and f6. Even opening the game up when it favors the other side may offer more chances than playing passively, may help open up your style, and give you practice in learning what squares are important.

  • 3 years ago

    glenarreglo

    i dont know how to play the French i always get choked.

  • 3 years ago

    NM GreenLaser

    cookie3, I suggest John Watson as your first French Defense guru. I wouldn't call the French Defense "almost playable against anything," unless that means using the pawn structure e6 and d5 as much as possible. Certainly you can use that against not only e4, but d4, c4, Nf3, etc. You can also try to get White to aim for the French when 1.e4 is not played. This happened in game 18 of the above match. Spassky played 1.d4 and Korchnoi replied e6. Spassky played 2.e4 and Korchnoi answered with d5. You might consider an occasional Dutch Defense, since if 1.d4 e6 (hoping for 2.e4) 2.c4, then 2...f4 is the Dutch. The point is psychological. If White avoids the French, Black still chooses the opening. Some players have offered the French and Dutch as Black, such as Botvinnik and Keres. 

    By the way, "C-K" is OK.

  • 3 years ago

    cookie3

    Wow!  What a treasure of French games!  I have been thinking of switching to the french, (i currently play the C-K against 1.e4) and i have been told almost playable against anything.  Is this true, and could you recommend a good read for beginners to this defense?  Thanks for the great article!

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