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Sicilian Najdorf English Attack by GM Magesh and GM Arun

  • GM arunabi
  • | Apr 14, 2010
  • | 13417 views
  • | 24 comments

This week we shall return to the Sicilian Najdorf English Attack. It has always been a fascinating and a favourite opening for most of the top Grandmasters. Even the legendary Kasparov used it regularly with huge success and contributed a lot in the development of this opening theory. We are sure the Najdorf will be a top priority for the imminent Anand-Topalov Match since both players are not only the experts of this system but have also introduced splendid ideas against it. So being a fan of this great system we definitely expect a couple of games in this system by these great players.

In recent times the Najdorf system suffered a lot of problems with the English Attack and 6.Bg5. But still Black players manage to find a way out and come out successfully in their encounters. In the younger generation of players, Karjakin employs the Najdorf regularly with success. In today's game we shall see one of his encounters with an elite GrandMaster Peter Svidler in which he came up with a new idea and soon it was white who was in trouble.

 

 

This is a sub variation in the English Attack. White takes a more aggressive stance with f4-f5. With this idea White has more space on the kingside and often sacrifices the g-pawn with g4 and opens the g-file. White's attack is much faster and Black needs to find a suitable plan to counter this.
After 12.Kb1 h5!? Black had a clear plan to play on the queenside and only because it was a rapid blindfold game did an elite player like Karjakin fail to find the correct plan with 27. ... a5! But the opening part was definitely a success for Black. After h5 White's attacking idea was not so clear but Black had a free run on the Queenside. Next week we shall see 12.g4!? which is another important alternative that puts Black's system to the test.

Comments


  • 3 years ago

    SimonWebbsTiger

    @chessiologist

    6...Ng4 has been a popular reply. Some players will repeat with 7. Bc1 Nf6 8. Be3 Ng4 -- it's more of a psychological ploy. Some will play 8. Bg5, leading to the 6. Bg5 and ultra sharp variations. However, the die hard English Attack player will play 9. Bg5. For ease: 6...Ng4 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4 g5 9. Bg3 Bg7 is the usual line.

  • 5 years ago

    -2012-

    Very Informative. It seems like its main champion exponents are kasporav and fischer.

  • 5 years ago

    tigergutt

    blacks king is also exposed. both have exposed kings and attack eachother and its a race. its what makes the sicilian exiting:)

  • 5 years ago

    middleman3

    Never mind you are right, I looked it up. The Najdorf has a couple of variations where e-5 is used the English attack being one of them. The Najdorf is one of those bastard openings where you can do whatever you want. This is why Fischer liked it so much because the theory is whatever you make it.

  • 5 years ago

    middleman3

    If the theory of E-5 for black is the Najdorf then what is the Sveshnikov or Kalashnikov. Its my opinion that theory and position is the base for an opening not move order. I believe pure Najdorf theory is about E-6 for black or the (little center). What are your thoughts?

  • 5 years ago

    siamesenightmare93

    @ CharlySobe: Because White intends to push his Kingside pawns, as he is in excellent position for a Kingside attack, and so castling there would be suicide. Leaving the King in the centre would also be weak, as it would allow Black a clear advantage with his active rooks.

  • 5 years ago

    KingOfChess999

    Nice game, maybe some grandmaster like a English attack, but its not strong if you want strong to move Bg5, like a sicilian najdorf and most popular for most grandmaster and master. its all depends on chess opening.

    Congratulation and good luck both of you!

    Thank you very much.

    :)

    By: KingOfChess999

  • 5 years ago

    Coref7

    Kickass Najdorf! informative.

  • 5 years ago

    rockettorque

    A blindfold rapid game has fast move time controls and the players are blindfolded. If you play blitz games on live chess, it would be similar to a rapid game.

  • 5 years ago

    ModernCalvin

    Again, another great article in this series. I'm still sticking to my new 1. d4 repertoire, but I learned a lot here. Thanks.

  • 5 years ago

    cantonior

    thanksssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss for the nice game, its of the one the opening, i like to learn as black. hope you'll have more articles on the najdorf. best regards.

  • 5 years ago

    alpha122alpha

    I am weak in Sicilian and need a more solid understanding of the pace of the attack-defense methods that Black employs.

  • 5 years ago

    alpha122alpha

    Thank you for this in-depth analysis.

  • 5 years ago

    CharlySobe

    I dont get it. Why would white castle on the queen side where there is

    so much exposure and obvious weakness?

  • 5 years ago

    dran

    blindfold! woot!stress! haha... nice article!

  • 5 years ago

    gambit156

    nice

  • 5 years ago

    Maishall

    What's a rapid blindfold game?

  • 5 years ago

    chesteroz

    Yes, thanks.

  • 5 years ago

    pestaa

    Thank you.

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