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  • GM Gserper
  • | Jun 16, 2013
  • | 12592 views
  • | 21 comments

In the last two articles we analyzed brilliant attacking games of Rashid Nezhmetdinov. There the Great Master of Attack showed a number of useful attacking techniques that you can use in your own games. But one of the readers expressed the following opinion in the comment section:

"Entertaining, but it looks very much like a speculative sacrifice. I don't think White had enough attack. I doubt that Kasparov would have sacrificed the queen in that position against Karpov."

Well, it is difficult to say for sure what could have happened since Kasparov never had that exact position in his games against Karpov. But look at the next game from their last World Championship Match, in 1990. Kasparov did sacrifice his queen for much less obvious compensation compared to the Nezhmetdinov's game, and Karpov was really lucky to escape for a draw. Judge for yourself:


This is an amazing game! Looking at the position immediately after the queen sacrifice it is difficult to believe that Black has enough compensation, and yet Karpov was really happy to escape with a draw. Was this sacrifice speculative? You bet! But this is one of the ways to play chess: you create a lot of problems for your opponent and even if a chess engine proves after the game that the sacrifice wasn't sound, it is irrelevant in my opinion.

So, today you'll be offered a bunch of positions where the best move can be found if you have learned lessons from the Nezhmetdinov's games that we analyzed.



Here is the whole game:



How White should continue his attack in the following position?



Now try to solve 'the Petrosian's twins':



Here is one more typical combo:



Finally, I would like to offer you a position from one of my own game. This one was played in one of my most memorable tournaments where I became European Junior Champion:



I hope you enjoyed the puzzles!

Comments


  • 11 months ago

    kingfaraz786

    Highly acknoledge all ur articles,great source of learning.

  • 13 months ago

    furiousRIOT

    FIRE ON BLOG!

  • 13 months ago

    1ndio

    Brilhante!

  • 13 months ago

    GM_rudy

    TQ SIR

  • 13 months ago

    Kasvarof

    very nice article.. thanks. :)

  • 13 months ago

    Grandmanster9

    I did the Petrosian twins. It's everywhere.

  • 13 months ago

    negotiate

    I always learn so much from Judit's games that are shown on here- people have to see amazing things to beat her

  • 13 months ago

    negotiate

    So how about move 43....hxg3 from Karpov Kasparov.  I'm sure it is obvious why ...h3 is worse than hxg3, but it is not obvious for me yet, what is wrong with h3? 

  • 13 months ago

    adi007bond

  • 13 months ago

    bob_franklin

    Nice article thank you

    I also went for 21. Qb3+, but I guess it's a pretty easy win either way

  • 13 months ago

    Eraser

    queen sacrifice with the help on horse

  • 13 months ago

    vimzonich

    @bro-dek - No, white is not in check at that point.

    Houdini confirms - over +9 for Qb3+ vs. about +4.5 for Rxb7.

  • 13 months ago

    bro_dek

    vimzonich: White is in check at that point no?

  • 13 months ago

    vimzonich

    Thank you GM.  I belive in the final game 21 Qb3+ is even stronger no?

  • 13 months ago

    zrahman

    Brilliantly instructive - as usual!

  • 13 months ago

    pampaa

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 13 months ago

    kcsmith169

    Quite instructive, thanks!

  • 13 months ago

    Sutirtha11

    Brilliant puzzles. Highlight the power of the knight fork. And the Kasparov game is amazing.

    Great Series. You are my favourite writer,Sir.

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