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Learning from Masters: Gyula Breyer and his stunning opening ideas.

  • GM Gserper
  • | Oct 17, 2010
  • | 14406 views
  • | 52 comments

Today, one of the most talented chess players of his generation, Gyula Breyer is mostly remembered for the variation of the Ruy Lopez named after him: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.c3 d6 9.h3 Nb8!  The last paradoxical move which first undevelops the Knight and then transfer it to d7 has a deep idea.  First of all it opens a nice diagonal for the Bc8 (when it gets developed to b7) and also opens the path for the c7 pawn to attack White's center.  This is one of the most popular variation of the Ruy Lopez thanks to the numerous efforts of Boris Spassky. Other World Champions (Karpov and Kasparov to name a few) played this variation as well.  But the funny thing is, I was not able to find one single game played by Breyer with this variation! There is also an obscure line of the King's Gambit 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Qf3?! which is also called the Breyer variation. Unlike Breyer's line in the Ruy Lopez, this line was never popular and I found only one game played by Breyer which he convincingly...lost to Reti! 

Unfortunately, most of the games of this extremely talented chess player are lost or forgotten. But the second World Champion Lasker said once that if not for Breyer's premature death (at the age of 28), he would have been World Champion for sure.  Probably Lasker's opinion was greatly influenced by the next game where 18 years old Breyer completely crushed the World Champion!

(Just like in most of my articles I give you a chance to test your attacking skills, so the games are given as a Quiz.  Please remember that you can always replay the whole game from the first move if you click "Solution" and then "Move list".)

 

Today I want to share with you a forgotten idea of Breyer's in a very popular modern opening: the Semi-Slav Defense.
In the next game he played an unusual 6.f4 move to increase his control over the center and one of the most amazing games I have ever seen started...
If you have correctly guessed White moves till this point, pat yourself on the shoulder.  White has sacrificed a pawn to get a formidable center, but how should he take advantage of his promising position?
So, White has sacrificed a minor piece and started a direct attack against Black's King.  But you ain't seen nothin' yet!  If you manage to guess correctly White's next move-- and its idea from the first attempt-- then you are a true chess genius!  Believe me, I really mean it!
This unbelievable game features one of the deepest and most amazing opening concepts where White envisioned the coming King's side attack when he played 6.f4 and especially 8.Bb1! Now you dear readers can see why it was such a big loss for the Chess World when Gyula Breyer passed away in 1921 being just 28 years old...

Comments


  • 3 years ago

    Samer-Syr

    nice

  • 4 years ago

    bayanaad

    ths good

  • 4 years ago

    greatexcalibur

    AWESOME!! Cool

    Thanks for sharing this amazing game! 

  • 4 years ago

    greatexcalibur

    AWESOME!! Cool

    Thanks for sharing this amazing game! 

  • 4 years ago

    leonelcm

    Impressive, elegant, amazing, wonderful... I agree, without Gyula Breyer chess history is as we know it. Thanx, really thanx for sharing...

  • 4 years ago

    Main850

    impressiveSurprised

  • 4 years ago

    Jake-2k7

    Outstanding article

  • 4 years ago

    NimzoRoy

    Thanks for showing us this amazing game. I knew that Breyer was one of the "lesser" hypermodern Masters ("lesser" well-known than Nimzo & Reti) and have probably seen a few of his games before, but I'll never forget this one!

  • 4 years ago

    mikemckernan22

    Kf1 was a very deep and exciting and beautiful move, i saw this combination in a book by british chess writer Bill Hartston, white was preparing an elegant and amazing attack he was preventing black from interposing a check ( was it eight moves later not sure, he definitely saw very deeply into the position) and after this seemingly innocuos little move black is powerless to stop the coming onslought, great stuff, beautiful article, thank you very much....

  • 4 years ago

    rapidcitychess

    Dude... I saw most of it right up 'till Kf1!!!!! Maybe it isn't needed, but it is awesome!! Who cares if you can win with Qf3 or the like and attack down the h file... this is a way cooler way of doing it!

    How have I never known of Breyer!!

  • 4 years ago

    icsun

    Black is superior if 11. ...b4 attacking Knight, not 11. ...g6

  • 4 years ago

    nibir

    @acerter.. please read the comment of GM Serper on move 22. ..Rf7 carefully. click on "Move list" you will see his comment that why 14.Kf1 was necessary.

    really amazing move and game. Smile

  • 4 years ago

    iguna

    Wow what a combination!

    He did it against The WC!

    Why such a combination, We never see that again, in so many International tournament, including The WC??

  • 4 years ago

    drumdaddy

    Thanks for the well-presented diagrams.

  • 4 years ago

    darol

    Here is a very cool game by Jose Raul Capablanca playing the Breyer Gambit for those who are interested: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1076230

  • 4 years ago

    acarter

    Why not 14. Qg4 in the 2nd game? I don't understand why 14.Kf1 was necessary. If Black tries to defend against 15.Qh4 by playing 14...Kg7, then 15.Rh7+ follows again, like in the game.

  • 4 years ago

    jaycsa

    niceKiss

  • 4 years ago

    FURQUAN

    TRULY AMAZING.

  • 4 years ago

    KingJaysee

    like it

  • 4 years ago

    derv_loko41

    I think this was a favorable variations for Karpov. Don't you?
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