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The Fallen Eagle

  • GM Julio_Becerra
  • | Jun 23, 2010
  • | 10484 views
  • | 38 comments

Carlos Torre Repetto was born in Yucatan, Mexico, in 1904. He is considered one of the brightest geniuses of the game of all time. His games are usually measured and qualified as jewels of beauty in books and journals. The Masters of the epoch compared him to Capablanca. In contrast, his life was marked by tragedy, a physical illness whose injuries affected his central nervous system, and suddenly stopped his climb to the peak of world chess. The chess life of the best Mexican player of all time is similar to other shooting stars of chess history, such as Paul Morphy and Rudolf Charousek, who for one or another reason just left a sample of their enormous potential.
He learned to play chess at the age of six, and in 1915 he went to the United States to attempt to prove himself against America's best chess players, winning the Louisiana Championship in New Orleans 1923 and also winning Detroit 1924. In the same year, Torre took third place in New York. In 1925, he took tenth place in Baden-Baden and tied for third/fourth place with Frank Marshall, behind Aaron Nimzowitsch and Akiba Rubinstein, in Marienbad. In the same year Torre took fifth/sixth place with Savielly Tartakower in Moscow and second/third place in Leningrad. In Chicago 1926, he tied for second/third place with Géza Maróczy, behind Marshall and won, ahead of Jose Joaquin Araiza, in Mexico City.
But his name is linked to one of the best and most famous gems of chess history. We are talking about his game against Emanuel Lasker during the Moscow Tournament in 1925. There he produced and created a new tactical idea: “The Windmill” or “El Molino.” His opinion about this game, even with a brilliant finish, an example in many textbooks, is very unconventional: "I do not think it was a good game, both made several mistakes, that was one of my worst games, and also the worst of Lasker.” Really very, very few people would give this honest opinion!

 


Also, he invented “The Torre Attack”; very popular among those chessplayers who do not like studying opening theory! It is characterized by the moves 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bg5 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 d5 3.Bg5. The ninth World Champion Tigran Petrosian was one of the opening's best specialists. Additionally Carlos Torre introduced the Mexican Defence to chess theory in a match against Fritz Sämisch, in Baden-Baden 1925: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 Nc6!?
One of his most well-known phrases was the next one:
"The development of our ability is not that we become erudite in openings and expert in the endgame, because there is no development without harmony ... we should principally strive to play all stages equally well, that is, to play chess..."
Taking into account that Carlos Torre left chess at the age of just 21 years, it is impossible to know where he could have gone under “normal” circumstances, but it is quite conceivable that he could have fought for the world championship.
In 1977 FIDE awarded him the International Grandmaster title based on his results in the mid-1920. Torre was the first Mexican to ever achieve this title. Every year his birth city celebrates an international tournament in his memory.

 

 

Comments


  • 22 months ago

    Misternudillo

    Wikipedia no es la mejor referencia. 

  • 22 months ago

    SolomeoParado

    As a Mexican I'm ashamed and mad that there's so little interest in chess. Ah!! but as long there's a soccer game, and crowds will go wild. Nothing against soccer, I just can't help it seeing people go crasy for trash music and don't even knowing who Mozart was.  

  • 22 months ago

    thewind

    todo un maestro!! si estaria bien incluir los movimientos anteriores. Saludos desde Mexico lindo.

  • 4 years ago

    ProfessorEvil

    Torre's immortal game against Lasker was brilliant.

  • 4 years ago

    teremoana

    Very interesting story, to start playing chess at 6years old. Thats amazing

  • 4 years ago

    Progressive_Groove

    Based on the recent comments ... I am happy to say that I feel the same way: I agree with the other chess.com members who feel that "annotated games should include the opening moves."

    To be introduced to a chess genius of such rare talent as Torre Repetto, and then to be denied his opening game tactics (which lead to the examples used in this article), was such a removal of accessible resources, that the article itself seems to me to be somewhat incomplete.

    I always find it fulfilling and uplifting to see, or hear of a champion from the Latin American culture (my profile claims Latin American and is not specific so as to prevent racial attacks). In fact, my focus of interest is always directed toward the Latin American competitors (in any sport) even before I begin to look at the stats of the other competitors. As an avid reader of Chess.com articles, I was hoping that GM Becerra would continue his work of listing the beginning moves of every game as he has done in the past, however, upon comtemplation, I believe it must be tedious to write as many articles as are written by the GM contributors and still include the opening moves, therefore, I won't hold such high standards against future articles of chess.com.

    Otherwise, this article has opened my eyes to yet another Chess Champion of the Professional Chess World, who just happens to be of the Latin American culture (an added bonus!), and for that ... I am humbly grateful.

    Peace

  • 4 years ago

    Alexitooo

    Big one the last! I enjoy with it. Thx Sir Torre! :D

  • 4 years ago

    muralidharancg

    desparado

  • 4 years ago

    leonelcm

    As a mexican chess fan I thank you because of this article. I agree, the best mexican chess player ever. I read about Torre Repetto in 1986, and I learned many things about chess witj it. I have a book of Torre's 64 best chess games. Thanx for sharing this article with all chess fans and players that log-in every day to chess.com, the best chess site in the world...

  • 4 years ago

    ProgressiveKing

    Thanks for the article but it would be interesting to  see the games from the beginning.

    thanks

  • 4 years ago

    Progressive_Groove

    hmmm ... no. 

    I've read other articles posted here that show specific puzzles for a specific purpose ... but they ALSO include the beginning moves. Come to think of it, I believe I posted a comment on one of GM Julio Becerra's articles in which I commented on how I was relieved that the prevailing moves were posted. Not to mention, I'v always like GM Becerra's Peruvian knit beanies that sometimes appear in his photos in Chess Life Magazine (my best friend is Peruvian and he's given me such colorfully knitted beenies but with the ear flaps and tie-cord ... a definite gift of value). I have nothing against the Chess Master himself, I just wanted a complete list of moves .. that's all. 

    I don't know, I guess I like to "feel" the game as oppose to "seeing it" and I think  posting the prevailing moves allows a player to "feel" the game .. rather than just "seeing" it, an option that should at the very least be available, if not optional.

    It's just an opinion ... sheesh.

  • 4 years ago

    Progressive_Groove

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 4 years ago

    kd2013

    An excellent player... too bad he died at a young age.  Thanks for sharing this great article. Cool

  • 4 years ago

    DrizztD

    I thoroughly enjoyed this article. Thanks for posting it

  • 4 years ago

    ralrose91

    Shame he stopped at, what, 21? He could have gone on to be far more amazing. Good article, good games. Gotta love the rook sacrifices.

  • 4 years ago

    MikeRoesell

    Going on what David said.  If you want the whole game then what you need to is search it in the databases that are online and find it.  GM Becerra has given you all the data you need. Why should he have to spoonfeed the games to you when you can look them up online?

  • 4 years ago

    IM dpruess

    he did not die at 21, he just left competitive play.

    when you open a book of tactics, solve a few positions, go to the back for the solutions, do you then scream and throw the book away when you find the full game score is not at the back so you can recreate the game on a board?

    in this article, Julio is selecting out tactics that he thinks are either beautiful or good for you to solve or good for you to have seen; he's not trying to show a series of games. there is one entire short game he wanted to show, and he did. it's normal in chess that we often work with game fragments because there is a focus. for example, you'll find opening moves with discussion and evaluation, and you don't see how the game ends, bc the author is discussing an opening. or you'll start with a position with rook and pawn vs. rook, because the discussion is focused on theoretical rook endgames.

  • 4 years ago

    Progressive_Groove

    An A+ article with an F rating.

    Why do writers ... persist ... on not listing the opening moves to their chess board puzzles !!! This is one great example where the opening moves would be ... WWWonderful to examine ... but no ... just the last 5 or 10 moves ... that's all ... opening moves no big deal ... I mean ... they're not even documented in the moves list so that .. at the very least .. I could make the extra effort to pull my chessboard out, arrange the pieces and take the time play the opening moves ... just so that I could see how these "Master's of Mastery" .. even start ... and to see how they even got to the situation which the puzzle presents. I mean, it's like someone saying: "Here's a trail of a chess master's footprints that you can follow ... but don't start here where he began .. start here where he finds himself at a fork in the road."

    I swear.

    Sheesh.

  • 4 years ago

    Progressive_Groove

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 4 years ago

    BigHickory

    An article in Wikipedia says he died in 1978.  There is a link in that article to a site with all his games.

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