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The Queen's "Hidden Passage"

  • GM Gserper
  • | Apr 1, 2013
  • | 13756 views
  • | 35 comments

A Queen is by far the most powerful chess piece and whenever we attack we are usually trying to bring our Queen to the action ASAP. But what if a chess player moves his Queen in the opposite direction? Is he insane? As the saying goes, there is a method to the madness.  Since our opponents are well aware of our intentions, they try to prevent our major force from joining the attack.  In situations like this sometimes moving in the opposite direction is the shortest way to achieve the goal.  Here is the classical example:

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Even though Grandmaster Janowski didn't defend the best way, the game nevertheless made a very strong impression on the chess world.  Here is how on of the best chess players of his time utilized Rubinstein's idea:

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After these two brilliant games, I hope you, my dear readers, are ready for the next gem. Don't try to figure out all the details, just guess White's idea in the position on the next diagram!

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If even after checking out the solution you still have no idea what's going on, don't be upset, this is absolutely natural Smile Here is GM Rozentalis' explanation:
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"I was thinking how to use my strategic advantage and penetrate into Black's position. Position was closed, so I wanted to open the Queen-side.  That's why I put my Queen back to d1. I played a3-a4 in order to win some space. I think that the swap of the Queens on a3 was a decisive mistake, as White gained the open b-file. The a-pawns could never be attacked and moreover they could attack the Black b-pawn. Black should refrain from ...Qxa3.  However, White could try to play further Qc5 or even Qd6."  After this detailed explanation, please enjoy the whole game:
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Using a hidden passage to quickly transfer Her Majesty to the desirable destination is not very common. Personally, I never had such an opportunity in my games; yet I enjoy the sheer beauty of this idea.  I hope you will have more luck and surprise your opponents with an unexpected Queen maneuver!

Comments


  • 18 months ago

    willconley

    @Kingssac Thanks man, yeah, he kind of just shoved his pieces around the queenside like a kid unwilling to eat his Brussels sprouts. So I cleaned his plate for him. ;) (Oh, I gloat. But he called me a cheater, so I get to do that.)

  • 18 months ago

    willconley

    Interesting: My queen did something very similar on April 7. I blogged about the game, too. Check it out. http://www.chess.com/blog/willconley/i-guess-im-a-cheater

  • 18 months ago

    icyfire77

    I was kind of confused when reading this article.

  • 18 months ago

    kosiu_drumev

    Up to move 39 black is loosing anyway. My point is that bxa6 is a better. And then white will win without fireworks and in more moves. That's all.

  • 18 months ago

    Newba

    I use to do it sometimes at the Dutch defense.. A simple shift from d8 to e8 sometimes helps me to attack the castled king on the kingside, with the aid of a rook push. It's nice :D

  • 18 months ago

    Kasvarof

    Thanks, interesting article!

  • 18 months ago

    Adithya1991

    If 39. ...Kc8 instead of bxa6, then I think Ra5 is winning, because it increases pressure on the a pawn, as well as the bishop.

  • 18 months ago

    Krapov111

    kosiu_drumev 

     

    In last game I couldn't understand why 39. ... Kc8 instead of 39. ... bxa6. And if the last is played, where will go all that white's play beauty?!

     

    I guess that if he plays 39. ... bxa6 then after 40. Ra5 black loses the a pawn.

  • 18 months ago

    ordenanza

    Thank you for the interesting article!

  • 18 months ago

    Crab-A-Blanca

    The queen's hidden passage if you know what I mean...

  • 18 months ago

    Wappinschaw

    V good!

  • 18 months ago

    cybercoder

    is there any training program for increase and progress our strategic approach to find candidate moves?

  • 18 months ago

    KarabasJr

    good Cool

  • 18 months ago

    KarabasJr

    i understand

  • 18 months ago

    Spektrowski

    39... bxa6 40. Ra5, winning both a6 and d5 (and most probably also c4) pawns by force.

  • 18 months ago

    kosiu_drumev

    In last game I couldn't understand why 39. ... Kc8 instead of 39. ... bxa6. And if the last is played, where will go all that white's play beauty?!

  • 18 months ago

    FM VPA

    Her Majesty has all the powers to move over 64 squares provided she is directed by  a geniusKiss

  • 18 months ago

    hyperniko

    I had this before that I was playing black and moved my Q from g5 to d8. Then went to queen side and win because my queen was more powerful in that side than in the kingside.

  • 18 months ago

    bagani

    when white pushes a4 white should response with Qe7 followed by Bd7 maybe its a diffent story....but its really an instructive article i've learned a lot! upload more article!

  • 18 months ago

    danonuke

    Is it treason to write about The Queen's Hidden Passage?

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