Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

It's Always Nice When...

It's always a nice feeling when you know you didn't play that well (or perhaps you might have played like *%$* Tongue out) -- yet somehow, you managed a decent peformance score anyway. For me, that was certainly the case at last weekend's Metropolitan International tournament in Los Angeles, California.

Believe me when I say that I could list the things I did wrong -- from poor time management, lazy calculations, to not converting a single win as white -- in a 10 part article series, to be eventually converted into a novela Yell... but let's not depress everyone with that right now. Yes, I will study my games and learn from the "x's and o's" of my miscues... Of course I will try to see where I left theory and was outprepared by my opponents in the opening stage... And yes, I will subject myself to the critiques of the one and only great Houdini Engine Wink...

But the bottomline is that it wouldn't take a genius (or anyone over 1800 for that matter) to realize that I wasn't in top form. Sometimes, you look back at a tournament where you didn't ever feel "quite right" (I actually was feeling a little under weather too, but I don't think it affected my play) and you just have to be greatful that things didn't go any worse!

As we discussed in my last blog, the "journey to GM" is going to be a long one. Patience and allowing myself to "enjoy the ride" is just as important as the results right now. So though it's true that I look back on last week's tournament and admit to myself that I have a lot of work to do....

IF I can score 5.5 out of 9, gain 10-15 FIDE rating points, and be in the running to place well up until the final round in tournaments of "bad form" (where I can't even convert clear advantages -- see the Yang game below -- and I play like garbage with white -- see the Akobian game as well--) then I have to be pretty pumped about my chances when I am in "good form"... right??? 

 

 

and a good one for the road...

 

Comments


  • 3 years ago

    timlawson

    @ gohn1953,

    I think you need to know the person before making baseless throwaway comments. I'm not even convinced you have read (or understood) IM Rensch's post. If you have seen any of Danny's live sessions videos, you might understand a) how good he is and b) he certainly doesn't want to give up or does give up when playing chess!

    I won't disagree with you that there are players out there (I call it "150 syndrome" in the UK - which is equivalent to ELO 1850 by the way, so it's a half decent club standard) where you get "prima dona's" but Danny is honest and sometimes, in my humble opinion, TOO HONEST and put's his ass on the line, win lose or draw when he makes a live sessions video.

    The worrying thing for me? My rating just hit 150... time to prepare my ready made excuses for the coming season...... Tongue out

  • 3 years ago

    RookedOnChess

    gohn, I think the problem is that you're comparing Danny to someone like that. I can't imagine Danny giving up chess or having that kind of attitude. There's no "throwing hands up in the air" going on at all. What I see here is an expression of the ups and downs of the possibly long road to becoming a GM and what kind of work must be done to achieve it.

  • 3 years ago

    gohn1953

    no envy---on his worst day he is better than i am---just tired of chess masters having excuses for losing and being brilliant when winning-----case in point a series opf articles by a young player trying to get his norms----when he loses he wants to give up chess but when he wins its all cherries and cream

  • 3 years ago

    timlawson

    I'll back Danny up on this... I play chess when I am 100% functional and I still make bad moves! I think someone's on a wind-up! Of course, it might not be anything to do with jealousy?! Foot in mouth

  • 3 years ago

    IM DanielRensch

    @gohn1953 -- Being "slightly" under-the-weather had NOTHING to do with my poor play. I made a ton of mistakes. Not an excuse...

  • 3 years ago

    RookedOnChess

    Actually, anyone who watched the broadcasts knew of him being ill since David happened to mention it. Btw, Danny is not whining...he's venting.

  • 3 years ago

    gohn1953

    doesn't matter he gave a reason to justify his poor play---we didn't know of him being ill

  • 3 years ago

    RookedOnChess

    gohn, did you happen to miss where Danny said that although he didn't feel well, he didn't think it affected his play? Obviously, you did.

  • 3 years ago

    gohn1953

    tired of excuses-------i didnt feel well-----every time one of these whiners has a less than brilliant result its because something was holding them back

  • 3 years ago

    karangtarunasemarang

    nice...Smile

  • 3 years ago

    timlawson

    Honest as ever, Danny.... I'm going to enjoy looking through the games. One of my students' parents has become a complete and utter "statto" on what's important at the top level. What's important is... FEWER LOSSES. I think that part of this is psychology. No chess player prefers to play someone who is "difficult to beat" than someone who is, say, slightly more erratic (at least that's my personal view anyway). It's all about the rep, baby!

    That said, I'm still teaching my students to play as much attacking chess as possible... when they progress slightly (hoepfully there'll be a bunch of them coming through the ranks soon thanks to the junior chess club in Northampton) that might be the time to get them to start looking at critical points in a game.

    Keep enjoying yourself! As for me, I'm going to try and be more adventurous this season... hopefully fortune will favour the brave!

  • 3 years ago

    NKT73

    I consider Expert a good level to achieve.  I would be more than happy achieving Expert level!!  I would be happy if I were you!!  hehe  In any case, congratulations on getting to where you are already

  • 3 years ago

    MIDYMAT

    Don't get yourself down, but '' not converting a single win as white ''.......really?.....

     

    But don't worry you will be ready next tourney....

  • 3 years ago

    RookedOnChess

    Hey, Danny, try not to beat yourself up too much. I think it's like anything else in life where one day or week you're simply more "on" than others. It's also difficult to fight your nature, whatever that is (I know someone mentioned patience), especially with clocks running (I hate those clocks! lol).

    Give yourself a break---you're a man who wears MANY hats. Just because you were "wearing" your "chess player" hat at the time, doesn't mean you're completely in "chess player" mode 110% when you need to be. Sometimes you "get a hit," sometimes you foul 'em off or strike out. We're all humans---not robots :) And you know we'll ALways be pulling for you :)

  • 3 years ago

    ChessMarkstheSpot

       We were all pulling for you Danny and in every Chess.com/TV broadcast everybody was asking for the results of your games or for you to come on the broadcast alongside your partner-in-crime David.

       We all know here that you want to become a GM and I am sure that you will, but like you said, it's going to be a long one. But you have the skill for it. We all know that. Patience and discipline are always two tough things to deal with, no matter what level you're at in this game. All you can do is take the experiences, along with the good and the bad, from this tournament and use that to prepare for the next one.

       We're all with you Danny and hopefully we can enjoy the ride with you if you don't mind all of the company. Cool

       -Mark

  • 3 years ago

    markronilodevera

    Cool

  • 3 years ago

    fish_food

    For what is worth, take some consolation that others learned from your experience...I know I did.

    The ending against Yang (actually a NQE, or 'not quite an ending', using GM Flear's word from 'Practical Endgame Play, beyond the basics') was anything but trivial. I am sure I would have drawn, and probably many GM's would have drawn too...since how many would see that only Qc2, keeping control of e4, wins, versus your Qa2 which draws?

    I have studied quite a few rook endings in my day, but no Q + R vs Q + R...which amazing enough, Flear says is the second most common NQE, the first being R +N vs R +B. I did not know that. Wow. I know what I am going to start studying.

    Flear states King safety in Q + R vs Q + R is often the most important thing. You had 2 pawns protecting your king, black had 4. Who's king was safest? Blacks -- complicating your job.

    Chapter 20 of Flear (the last chapter) interestingly enough gives an NQE (Almasi-Bacrot) similar to yours  where the defense easily draws because of good piece activity against the king, even though the superior side had an outside passer.

  • 3 years ago

    vowles_23

    That was good, thanks davidmelbourne for sharing that link.

  • 3 years ago

    davidmelbourne

     Comments from the peanut gallery....as in waddo I know?? Anyways...Tongue out

    The Akobian game - no patience, Danny!- it seems to my no-rater eye;  you tried for a win out of the box, pushed too hard, created holes which Var stepped into with natural moves. 

     

    Yang would have been justifiably very relieved, and you, justifiably dissapointed. Not an easy win- he does have a 4/2 on the Kside...but still...again, seems to me a lack of patience, to grind out the win. This game http://blip.tv/chess/chess-pelletier-carlsen-part-1-5391707 is astonishing, in how patient Carlsen is, in converting his win. 

     

    No patience required in the Sevillano game- he was the one who pushed too hard, got greedy grabbing that epawn,  allowing you to play your natural aggressive style with the c-pawn push, winning decisive material. 

     

    First: don't lose. Its with good reason that GMs play endless numbers of draws. Playing for equality as Black/being satisfied with equality as White/patience! is the takeout msg for me from looking at yr games.  

  • 3 years ago

    Aliyat-EJ

    The Scorpions could have used a player of your caliber this season.

    - EJ

Back to Top

Post your reply: