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My 1st TN in the Chess Encyclopedias

Comments


  • 11 months ago

    NM BMcC333

    Thanks Mattisks,

    I do have a book that I have completed but still tweak here and there. I have not submitted it for publication but do sell the latest version at ebay.

     

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/181299476039?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649  Contact me if interested in buying this or the e-version.

  • 11 months ago

    mattisks

    Like your talk the talk and walk the walk approach in your analysis. Thanks for interesting reading. 

    Do you have any book under your belt?

  • 2 years ago

    NM BMcC333

    Thanks SD for the compliment and suggestion!

  • 2 years ago

    sapientdust

    Thanks for the interesting game and the great annotations.

    [To chess.com: please improve your PGN viewer. It's just ridiculous that there's no way to expand the widget or make the comment field larger. People shouldn't have to resort to things like using HTML to work around your poorly designed widget.]

  • 3 years ago

    NM BMcC333

    Here is a link to a pdf version of this article with diagrams and paragraphs. Hope that helps make it more readable.  

    http://webspace.webring.com/people/gb/bmcc333/Shirazi_game.pdf

  • 3 years ago

    NM BMcC333

    Thanks for writing, if you have this question others probably also do.

    TN = Theoretical Novelty, a move never before played

    N = Novelty, a relatively new moves, little used

  • 3 years ago

    Dadg777

    Um, what's a TN?

  • 3 years ago

    NM BMcC333

    unouwant2, thanks for the compliment and testimonial. pwnsrppl2, I agree there is a somewhat arbitrary system for assigning TNs to new moves. If you look at the date on this game, it was 19 yrs ago. As I mentioned in the article, I am sure there is someone who lost out when they gave one of my Sicilian games the treasured novelty label. I was surpised when 4. e3 was given a TN. but there are no prior games in any database that I have searched. I have been on the other side before. At the board in the last round of the Tennessee State High School, as a 1600, I invented a TN in the Center Counter, after the ECO had run out, that would not be played in master play for years, which earned me the champion's title. However, the move suffered a major historical setback when it was employed by  IM Strauss in a California event when he became the 1st titled player to lose to a store bought box, a Fidelity chess challenger. The game was printed in a full page ad on the back of chess life. At that point I was happy my name was not attached to the move, although I am still proud of the idea, which is clearly the best move in the position.  

    I also agree HTML is a much better format for viewing games. I will try to post this soon as a page at my web site.

  • 3 years ago

    dzhao14

    For those who are having trouble reading the first annotation.

     

    In this age of free online databases with millions of games it is hard for new generations to appreciate the importance of the Informant series put out twice a year from the 1966 to 1990 and three times a year after that. These games were almost entirely self submitted games and it constituted the bulk of theory at the time. I used to pay Luis Hoyos Milan 15 dollars for Xerox copies of any tournament bulletins he could scrounge up on his world travels, My 1st student, IM Ronald Burnett was a roommate on Staten Island for some of this time and thought I was being ripped off, but I was glad to get some other theory that most people could not get. Now one can get the games of almost any top event for free round by round as they are happening. I remember vividly when my 1st games were printed in the Informant series, the Whitehead and Belapolsky games in Informant 39 (both in this book). I had them shipped to the Merrill Lynch mailroom where I worked and when they arrived I kicked a box of mail across the room. I remember a few of the mail clerks looking at me and some joking comment about calling security. I remember telling the head clerk, Mac, that it meant my name was in chess history forever. This game represents the next stage in the process. One of my games from the Informant was chosen for the next edition of the Encyclopedia of Chess Openings. Of the 700 or so games in each Informant only a few make the new editions. I have the first edition of every ECO because the chapters were mostly written by the legends of the Soviet School of Chess. It is not easy to improve on most of their opinions. I was shocked to see a novelty attached to my 4th move. I was given a novelty for my Belopolsky game that eventually was shown to have been played by someone else decades earlier, but this TN still stands. There are not that many chances to make a good TN on move 4, but it shows the game is still a long way from being played out by too much book. A claim made by Capablanca when he suggested the rook-knight become a new piece on a 9x9 board and Bobby Fischer when he tried to sell his Fischer-random chess (aka chess 960 for the number of starting positions) to the world. If we really needed a weapon to hold off the computers and too much book, Pal Benko’s Pre-Chess is much better suited. Instead of only mirror positions, the 1st 8 moves are each player putting their pieces on any back rank square they wanted. Pal suggested this interesting variant in the 1970s and told me in the 90s that Bobby was borrowing his idea (paraphrase) but he didn’t make any waves over it. This game was played at the New York Comedy Club, which was then on the upper west side of Manhattan. I use this game to teach and diagnose tactical because I have seen so many different people try to solve the various positions. I give 2 problems to solve with solutions after the newspaper article. One is a puzzle from a possible position where I diagnose based on how long you take to solve it and what you saw. 1991 Harry James Open 1/27/91 rd. 3 bd.1 game/30 Informant 51, ECO A second edition white: Brian McCarthy 2302 black: Kamran Shirazi 2536 IM

  • 3 years ago

    pwnsrppl2

    4. e3 a novelty?  Or did I miss something?  It's been the standard move for me for around 15 years, and I'm sure I didn't invent it.  Congrats on getting an official TN in the books, but the process seems a little unfair.  One has to be a master or better and play it against an IM or better to be recongnized, it seems.

    Also, good game.

  • 3 years ago

    RC_Woods

    I'm going to side with batgirl and Nimzoroy. The viewer could use some work!

  • 3 years ago

    NimzoRoy

    As Batgirl pointed out, trying to play thru games with notes here is difficult and to me almost pointless (pun intended) due to the tiny font and tiny "remarks box" under the board. I quickly gave up on reading any game by anyone here using the board and reader available that chess.com provides and instead cut-and-paste each game I'm interested in into ChessBase 9, which also has the added benefit of making the variations and sub-variations way more distinct than lumping them all in parantheses, even with separate colors they are still confusing to follow and tell apart. 

    Cutting-and-pasting the games into Fritz also works just as well, and I'm pretty sure that reading games here using ChessMaster, Rybka and other major chess programs (even freeware programs) would also be a major improvement on reading them here. 

  • 3 years ago

    batgirl

    In my rather elementary opinion, an excellent game.  As I was playing through it, I was wanting to read your thoughts and commentaries, but, as I see others have noted, so much text in the tiny game window is overwhelming and difficult to follow.  There are many ways to handle text here, and none of them optimum compared to HTML, but I think putting all the text inside the game  window is possibly the worst way.  

    Thanks for the great game and the commentary, especially reprinted here in the comment area!

  • 3 years ago

    NM BMcC333

    Thanks for the comments. Denver, i am not sure how to do that in the chess.com game window for blogs. My book is spaced better and there are 1-2 diagrams per game, but not spacing every few lines. If you know someone who can publish it in a reputable publishing house and get us a book deal, maybe you can be co-author.

  • 3 years ago

    fish_food

    Ah, the shah Shirazi...

    He did managae to score a 1/2 point in the 1984 US Championships.

  • 3 years ago

    DENVERHIGH

    Once I came accross a book on obituaries that were published in newspapers. That is all that was in the book. It had no paragraphs. No dialog, just yada,  yada, yada, and more yada. It was the worst book I had ever seen published. It was published by a newspaper.

    I carried around just to show people in the various writing classes and groups that I was in, "How not to write a book."


    Paragraphs are free. It allows the eyes to flow. If it is just text, after text with no breaks the readers will lose interest because he is fighting a losing battle. You as a writer lose the reader and the reason you wrote what you posted is useless.

    Try quotation marks, paragraphs, spaces and see. I promise you won't get charged anything for using them, they are free.

    I am going to show you on your own posting text how much it improves by spacing it: Try reading this.

                                            = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    Black follows through on his c5 threat.

    My first instinct was to plant the bishop on d5 since I have the only white square bishop and trading it for a knight on d5 looked appealing.

    White is clearly better and it would be hard to lose (15...c4 16.h4 b5 17.h5 +0.69 d=15 Rybka 3).

    True story, as I looked at the bishop, a song from John Fogerty ran through my head, as if coming from the bishop: “Put me in coach, I’m ready to play, today, (look at me I can be centerfield)”!

    In chess camps I often ask the question, “What do you think when you see someone walking down the street talking to themselves?”.

    These days someone may say. "They are talking on their cell phone." But by and large I get the same answer as always, "they are crazy."

    I use this set up to tell people that talking to yourself walking down the street may be crazy but in chess you must talk to yourself.

    A one way dialogue is just not critical enough and can become just cheerleading. I also tell students to treat your chess pieces like your family, you are their general and their destiny is in your hands.

    I do not usually advise talking to your pieces but anyway to find the best move it's a good way 15.Ba4 Nb6 +2.10 d=16 Rybka 3.

                                = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    You have very good and interesting stuff. If I wanted to read it I would have to copy it and put it in my Word and space it out. I only read this paragraphs. I agree with Mrguy88.

                                              IMHO

                              Bye for now, no offense meant.

     

     


  • 3 years ago

    CMGuess

    I agree, people don't appreciate things. But take one of these so called trifles and you've got hell to pay!!

  • 3 years ago

    NM BMcC333

    move 17

    The encyclopedia line ends here with a large advantage for white. I think it is decisive. 17...Qb5 18.Qb3 Qxb3 19.cxb3 Bxf6 20.Nxf6 Kg7 21.Nd7 Nb6 22.Nxf8 Kxf8 23.Kc2 Ke7 24.Rd2 c4 25.b4 Rg8 26.Rd1 Rc8 27.Rd6 +2.24 d=15. Kamran used most of his remaining time to play Rfe8 and sacrifice the exchange (RxN or RxB) instead of frittering away his attack with Qb5 Qb3 and a trade of queens. Another “old Russian saying” is to think about sacrificing the exchange before losing the initiative or a pawn. In the case of the pawn, the logic is that the total units remains the same so your opponent can not just swap down to win when a pawn up.

  • 3 years ago

    NM BMcC333

    Here is move 14,

     

    Black follows through on his c5 threat. My first instinct was to plant the bishop on d5 since I have the only white square bishop and trading it for a knight on d5 looked appealing. White is clearly better and it would be hard to lose (15...c4 16.h4 b5 17.h5 +0.69 d=15 Rybka 3). True story, as I looked at the bishop, a song from John Fogerty ran through my head, as if coming from the bishop: “Put me in coach, I’m ready to play, today, (look at me I can be centerfield)”! In chess camps I often ask the question, “What do you think when you see someone walking down the street talking to themselves?”. These days someone may say they are talking on their cell phone, but by and large I get the same answer as always, they are crazy. I use this set up to tell people that talking to yourself walking down the street may be crazy but in chess you must talk to yourself. A one way dialogue is just not critical enough and can become just cheerleading. I also tell students to treat your chess pieces like your family, you are their general and their destiny is in your hands. I do not usually advise talking to your pieces but anyway to find the best move it a good way 15.Ba4 Nb6 +2.10 d=16 Rybka 3.

  • 3 years ago

    NM BMcC333

    Here is move 4, the TN:

    TN A novelty in Informant 51 with the simple idea of preserving the pawn structure without the standard Nd2. I have analyzed the nuances since the game, but during the game I just wanted to get out of Shirazi theory. A study of Kamran’s games show many flashy wins over strong players so he seems to be a natural player, but those high rated people did not know the depth of Shirazi’s preparation. He loses many rating points due to his incredible fighting spirit and unwillingness to draw outright losing positions to lower rated players happy to stop the madness. He said he once beat a master down a whole queen for nothing. Once when I beat him he was 2480 and twice he was over 2650 and he gained the 170+ points in a few months at the expense of some strong titled players! Our system favors those who cautiously gather their Fide and USCF points like acorns for food. Someday we will realize that an American player who can play big money games has a better chance to take the World crown than those who cower like the Wizard of Oz behind their paper mache ratings or the foreigners who manipulate our rating system for their personal gain. Some immigrants like Boris Gulko epitomize the American Dream and we can all be proud when he represents America under the current rules, but some are here to take advantage of our multiple zonal spots and lax residency requirements that allow them to live at their real home or in Europe most of the year while getting paydays for our Championship and or Olympics, money that should be going to real Americans. Adding insult to injury, the home country that they freely left or commute from, will not return the favor and give Americans two chances to qualify. Tennis bases its invitations on yearly winnings not how you did ten years ago. The Ryder Cup in golf is also decided by the money list and residency requirements. What is the point in having a country team tournament like the Olympics if anybody can play for any country?. Kamran and I drew our first game and then he beat me three in a row and each time I went home and found out he tricked me with ECO theory. By exiting the ECO at move four, I was already breaking the pattern. I have since evened my score with Kamran by fighting fire with fire and trying novelties against his wing gambit and delayed wing gambit. Since I seemed destined to leave the ECO first with Kamran I learned to come prepared! 4.e3 is a simple idea, why was such a simple move ignored? I see three reasons, first it is a sideline of a sideline and when the big guns have tried Bf4 they sought standard equality in the hope they were playing Bf4 for a quick draw. Second, the alternative Nbd2 gives a decent chance for advantage and third is a ghost in the closet due to the similar position: 1. d4 d6 2. Nf3 Bg4 3. Bf4 Nd7 4.e3 e5 0-1 (some Scandinavian IM - Asa Hoffman Manhattan Chess Club) because of the cruel twist 5. Bg3 e4 6. h3 Bh5 and the Bishop is in the way of the standard g4. If 5. Bg5? Bxf3!. Over a decade later, Rybka sees the way out! The position is still fine for white if 5…dxe5 dxe5 6. Bg3 e4 7. Qd4!! and the pin on the g4 bishop saves white from losing and maybe preserves a very slight edge. This shows the limits of human analysis because not only did an IM resign but no one I have showed the game saw it. We can’t see the d4 square with the queen on it, because the capture dxe5 seems irrelevant. A great lesson in visualization and not dismissing moves because they look silly. By answering Bg4 with Nd2 white avoids having to pay too much attention to what black is doing. For whatever reason a novelty on move four against a respected system Kamran and a few GMs have used for years in International tournaments is an honor. I take full advantage of not playing the standard Nd2 and what results is a model of classic development based on everything I ever learned from Fred Reinfeld and IA Horowitz. I have heard many players disparage Fred’s books but they were vital to me. Probably the majority of masters my age are “Fischer Boomers” drawn to the game by the most famous chess match of all time, Fischer-Spassky but I had already been reading chess books for at least a few years and playing in my grammar school. The dedication of people such as Reinfeld, Horowitz and Jack Collins, Bobby’s teacher, is how America was able to put out a world contender. The first chess book I remember getting from the library was “The Best in Chess” by Horowitz and Jack Straley Battell published in 1965. Right before the book starts is a drawing of a sailor playing chess with a man in a turban while 2 naked ladies watched, with one breast clearly visible! The caption read, “What would you do if you were in my place?” It seems the man in the turban is the one speaking, although his mouth is not open, with the implication that he did not want the game to end. At least I think this is as far as they wanted the innuendo to go. I showed the book to one of my friends who showed another and before you know it, the class was completely ignoring the nun teaching in our Catholic school and all attention was focused on my borrowed chess book. She quickly confiscated the source of distraction but could not understand why the class was feverishly passing around a chess book. As all eyes turned to me, I tried to play cool but cracked quickly and showed the nun the picture in question. She immediately ripped the picture out of the book and gave it back to me but the impression was enough that, if I wasn’t already hooked on chess, I was then. In a nice twist of fate, by the 8th grade the book was in tatters and the nuns gave it to me after I won the school championship. I had to punch holes in it and bind it into 2 notebooks, but I still treasured that book. Somehow over the years, maybe in my apartment flood at Staten Island, it was gone. I was lucky enough to spot this treasure, drawing in tact, at Thad Roger’s chess center in Atlanta Georgia, which my friends in the Road Warriors dubbed the House of Pain. I owe a debt of gratitude to the nuns at Holy Rosary Academy in Nashville Tennessee for maintaining a chess club or my life may have been greatly different. In this game I put both knights on bishop three and both bishops to bishop four. I went for a middle game with the pawns on e4 and d4 and I activated my queen and two rooks while securing the safety of my king. When the smoke cleared I was up a queen for a knight and we weren’t at move thirty. The obvious theoretical point is black can at least try 5...Bh5 as played by both GM Rohde and FM Asa Hoffman. I beat Asa in a similar position but lost to Mike in a repeat of this game. Against Mike I broke the pin with Be2, with Asa I went Bh2 first to minimize e5 and then went Bd3, Asa went Bg6 and instead of trading, I went Be2 and Asa went back with Bh5!, I repeated my improvement Bd3 intent on trading but retreated, ready to give Asa a quick draw, but Asa played on and allowed me to win his bishop with Nh4 and I went on to win. I have since been successful with a timely Qb3 aimed at the weak spots of f7 and b7. White can go violent with a g4, Nh4 expansion, but the fluid nature of the black structure requires exact play by white.

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