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Book Recommendation Request 4 KID & QID

Hello Friends,

I am looking for Book recommendation on Kings Indian Defense & also on Queens Indian Defense from Black point of view.

I am basically looking for the books that express idea behind these opening like strategic goal for Black & thematic tactical idea’s & pawn breaks. Mainly what are the plans for white & how would black counter attack the same?

I don’t want a book that provides lengthy theoretical continuation & does not cover explanation.

Kindly advise on the same.

Appreciate your valuable reply.

Regards,

Indian_Tiger!

Comments


  • 9 months ago

    Ambassador_Spock

    In the 1920's, 1.d4 Nf6 was considered an irregular opening.  Then Tartakower read an old German journal in which there was a game played in 1875 by two Brahmans which began 1.d4 Nf6.  Thereafter he jokingly referred to this as the "Indian Defense".  This is a group for players who are interested in learning and playing the White and Black sides of the hypermodern Indian defenses to 1.d4.  Our group repetoire includes 9 distinct openings: Benko Gambit, Benoni Defense, Bogo-Indian Defense, Budapest Gambit, Grünfeld Defense, Indian Game, King's Indian Defense, Nimzo-Indian Defense, and Queen's Indian Defense.  All our Team Matches, Tournaments, and Vote Chess games are based on these openings.  We currently have a 300 membership maximum.  Please apply if you:

    • play any of these openings
    • are interested in joining Team Matches or Tournaments or Vote Chess
    • wish to contribute in some way to our group
    • already belong to less than 50 groups.

     

    Click the Indians mascot to apply.

  • 17 months ago

    NimzoRoy

    If you open with 1.d4 and don't want to play vs the KID there's 1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 the "Anti-Indian" Opening which is OK for White, or even 2.Nc3 so if 2...g6 Black will end up playing a Pirc or Modern Defense. It's hard to plan for every possibility here until you can ID all the major openings yourself, as well as most of the mainline variations and systems AND know most of the common transpositions. Of course you can always choose to play vs the KID when necessary there are several major variations to choose from as White, and several more less popular alternatives.

    My guess is most of your opponents aren't exactly opening experts either so don't worry too much about being "outbooked" in most of your games. Start working on general principles for all phases of the game and if possible start playing some online games where you can take your time and look openings up instead of memorizing them.

    Start following Capablanca's advice and check out some of my blogs

    In order to improve your game, you must study the endgame before everything else. For whereas the endings can be studied and mastered by themselves, the openings and  middle game  must be studied in relation to the end game.

    The best way to learn endings, as well as openings, is from the games of the masters.  (annotated games are the best - NR)

    The game might be divided into three parts, the opening, the middle-game and the end-game. There is one thing you must strive for, to be equally efficient in the three parts.

    Ninety percent of the book variations have no great value, because either they contain mistakes or they are based on fallacious assumptions; just forget about the openings and spend all that time on the endings.

    http://www.chess.com/blog/NimzoRoy/chess-opening-principles?_domain=old_blog_host&_parent=old_frontend_blog_view

    http://www.chess.com/blog/NimzoRoy/beginner-chess-book-recommendations

    http://www.chess.com/blog/NimzoRoy/endgame-faqs?_domain=old_blog_host&_parent=old_frontend_blog_view

  • 17 months ago

    Indian_Tiger_24

    @NimzoRoy,

    Thanks 4 sharing your ideas.

    I got your point I should start with QGD first before KID or QID.

    But problem what I have is I am kind of d4 player. Whenever I start with d4, my opponent could play any system in which is more comfortable with let’s say QGD, SLAV or QGA or anything.

    As you said earlier, you gave up playing KID, but let’s say you open up with d4 how you avoid KID or hypermodern systems.

    Thanks once again.

  • 17 months ago

    NimzoRoy

    Which Double QP Openings system as Black you were referring to?  

    Whatever you're interested in playing as Black. 

    I usually play Slav & Semi Slav as my main weapon verses d4 but not I want to learn something new which is more dynamic in nature hence I chose KID or QID for that matter.

    I'd suggest trying some "orthodox" QGD defense (ie with 2...e6) there's several to choose from: Orthodox Defense, Lasker's Defense, Tartakower's Defense, Cambridge Springs Defense and more - or maybe even the QG Accepted and see if that works for you or not. 

    Since I lost most of the games in KID set up, I thought it’s better to study once what’s Black whole idea in KID exactly?

     I gave the KID up decades ago - it's too complex for me and I don't care for closed positions if I can avoid them. It's not surprising you had bad luck with it if you didn't know the underlying concepts and ideas, ie "Black's whole idea in KID"  Again, I advise trying out a QGD Defense as Black other than a Slav or Semi-Slav before attempting to learn any Indian Defense. 

    Click on this link for a decent overview of QGD

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen's_Gambit_Declined

  • 17 months ago

    Indian_Tiger_24

    Hey NimzoRoy,

    Which Double QP Openings system as Black you were referring to?

    I usually play Slav & Semi Slav as my main weapon verses d4 but not I want to learn something new which is more dynamic in nature hence I chose KID or QID for that matter.

    Since I lost most of the games in KID set up, I thought it’s better to study once what’s Black whole idea in KID exactly?

  • 17 months ago

    NimzoRoy

    I enjoy chess books. Check out Fundamental Chess Openings (FCO) by GM van der Sterren which explains the basic concepts and ideas of all major openings and variations, along with some basic lines of play usually less than 10 moves deep. Click on this link:

    http://www.amazon.com/FCO-Paul-Van-Der-Sterren/dp/1906454132

    AND nothing personal but judging by your rating I'd suggest you learn Double QP Openings first as Black, Single QP Openings are considered to be closed, while Double QP Openings are considered semi-open and the order in which openings should be learned is: open, semi-open and closed. This advice comes from the great hypermodern GM Richard Reti in his classic work Masters of the Chessboard BTW not me. 

    PS: Questions about openings should be posted in the Chess Openings forum, you'll probably get more replies that way. 

  • 17 months ago

    grass-hopper

    I don't enjoy chess books. I'd recommend this training DVD instead.

    "The King’s Indian is one of the most interesting and aggressive defences Black can choose. The World Champions Robert James Fischer and Garry Kasparov used to play this opening often and with great success, and also today’s word-class players are employing it frequently, like for instance Boris Gelfand, Alexei Shirov and Teimour Radjabov. On this DVD, Viktor Bologan (Elo 2690) presents a complete King’s Indian repertoire for Black. In 21 chapters the Grandmaster deals with all possible white reactions, showing the subtleties in main and side variations."

    see here: http://chessbase-shop.com/en/products/the_kings_indian

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