Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Squashing the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit: Schuman vs Gurevich 1993

There are certain gambits that you probably shouldn't try against a strong Grandmaster.  I'd put the Budapest gambit in that category, and certainly the Smith-Morra gambit in the Sicilian.  Here we have a 2300 player trying the Blackmar-Diemer gambit against Dmitry Gurevich. This game occurred at the Illinois Open in 1993.

While I can't call this game a refutation of the Blackmar-Diemer, it certainly is quite enough to send White back to the drawing board. If you study this game, you will gain understanding of a good way to handle this semi-sound Pawn offer by White.

 

Comments


  • 16 months ago

    Mainline_Novelty

    "Black takes the pawn practically for free."

    - Valery Aveskulov on 3...Nxe4 (from "Attack with Black")

  • 16 months ago

    Jpatrick

    Interesting. 

    When I wrote "no good way to decline" I was thinking of the position after 3..dxe4 4.f3  Many alternatives have been tried at that point but none are as good as just taking the Pawn.

    I don't know much about 3..Nxe4 I'll have to look at it.

    Thanks for the remarks.

  • 16 months ago

    Mainline_Novelty

    A couple points :

    By the game's move order, 3...Nxe4! is actually a vastly improved BMD for Black, considering he gets to exchange off a pair of minors in the process of accpeting the pawn.

    "No good way to decline it..." Uh...by the BMD Proper move order, 1.d4 d5 2.e4, 2...c6 and 2...e6 seem like fairly respectable declining methods. Even by the game's (bad...er...even more bad) move order, 3...e6 tranpo's into a Classical French.

  • 2 years ago

    Ricardoruben

    Nice example, thank you for posting! :)

  • 4 years ago

    mobidi

    Of course -only 11.Ne5!-was attacking move-but if you play gambit-you need to play aggressive-you don't have other choice! In other hand  such style of "attacking" is funny against strong GM(2670).

Back to Top

Post your reply: