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Week 1 Assignment

Week One's Assignment.

 

In the Becerra-Ramirez game (USCL 09),

 

(257) Becerra,Julio (2615) - Ramirez,Alejandro (2601) [B04]
USCL Miami vs Arizona Internet Chess Club (10), 04.11.2009



1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3.d4 d6 4.Nf3 dxe5 5.Nxe5 c6 6.Be2 Nd7 7.Nf3 g6 8.c4 Nc7 9.Nc3 Bg7 10.Be3 0-0 11.0-0 Ne8 12.Qd2 Nd6 13.Bh6 Bxh6 14.Qxh6 Nf6 15.h3 Nf5 16.Qd2 Qc7 17.Bd3 Ng7 18.Rfe1 Rd8 19.Qe3 Bf5 20.Bf1 Be6 21.Rad1 Nf5 22.Qc1 Qb6 23.Na4 Qa5 24.Nc5 Nxd4 25.Nxd4 Qxc5 26.Nxe6 fxe6 27.Rxe6 Rxd1 28.Qxd1 Rf8 29.Qe1 Rf7 30.b4 Qd4 31.Rxe7 Rxe7 32.Qxe7 Ne4 33.Qe8+ Kg7 34.Qe7+
Game drawn by mutual agreement 1/2-1/2

 

 


 

We went over in week one's broadcat (11/23/09) how white can play for a win with 31. Qe3!?. 

Your task is to identify another plan for white on move 31 that retains winning chances (but is entirely different; a question of style).


Add comments/ideas to my blog entry titled "Week 1 Solution".

Comments


  • 5 years ago

    IM Nezhmet

    The most concrete point I was looking for is that Re3 threatens to go to d3, seizing the only open file.  R/f7 powerless to oppose this plan.  White takes the d-file, and then improves his queen, bothering black on both flanks.

     

    The ending after Qe3 is also quite good for White.  A matter of taste!

  • 5 years ago

    RainbowRising

    small problem mercho in that Qxb7 loses the Q

  • 5 years ago

    merchco

  • 5 years ago

    joeysouth21

    I must admit, I do not think very concretely, and probably cannot explain Re3 in its fullest.  But I like three things about the move: (1) Re6 is slightly misplaced, since Rxe7 leads to an equal position and it has no mobility on e6; (2) Re3 gains mobility along the third rank; and (3) continues to keep pressure on e7. 

    Gaining this simple mobility creates a very favorable tension, since (as stated) the black rook is misplaced and cannot defend the queen side.  If white can keep presure on e7, while at the same time placing a bishop on g2 (or pushing b5 to begin a queenside assault) then black will have too many weaknesses and will collapse. 

    Additionally, with the queen on e2 and the rook on e3, white can always play Rd3, attacking the queen and preparing an invasion on the 8th rank.  All of this means that white will control both the center and the queenside, which neutralizes blacks kingside ambitions, and places more tension on black's position than he may be able to endure. 

    Overall, this is the kind of plan that white should look for, since his only advantage currently is the (slightly) disrupted black pawns, and the bishop versus the knight.  Improving the rook makes another slight advantage.  This begs for white to play on both sides of the board, mercilessly attacking blacks pawn structure, which he cannot defend with a knight and a misplaced rook. 

  • 5 years ago

    IM Nezhmet

    joeysouth21 starts well but I need more there talking about Re3! --- what's the key point of that move? (take into account black's for-the-moment passive rook on f7).

  • 5 years ago

    Phelon

    If Qe3 works because white can take blacks a pawn, then would Qe5 work as well? The Qb8-a7 route seems to work just as well.

  • 5 years ago

    joeysouth21

    Instead of Qe3, Re3 seems to offer white chances with his strong central control, better pawn structure, and bishop over the knight.  Qe2 (protecting c4) followed by Re3 also seems to do the same.  Eventually white will maneuver his bishop to g2 and have a better position. 

  • 5 years ago

    IM Nezhmet

    The photo is famous ex-WC Alexander Alekhine, author of some of the core books I mentioned in Week 1.

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