Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Week 4 Material

[Event "North American Open"]
[Site "Las Vegas, NV"]

[Date "2009.12.29"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Milman, Lev"]
[Black "Ginsburg, Mark"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B83"]
 
 
[EventDate "2009.12.26"]
[EventRounds "7"]
[SourceDate "2009.12.30"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e6 6. Be2 Be7 7. Be3 O-O 8.
O-O Nc6 9. f4 Bd7 10. Qe1 Nxd4 11. Bxd4 Bc6 12. Qg3 g6 13. Qe3 Qa5 14. e5 dxe5
15. fxe5 Nd5 16. Nxd5 Qxd5 17. Bf3 Qc4
(17... Qb5 18. a4 Qb4 19. Bxc6 bxc6
20. b3 c5 21. Bc3 Qb7)

18. b3! Qa6 19. c4 Qa3 20. Kh1 Kg7 21. Rf2 (21. Bxc6 bxc6
22. Qe4 (22. Rf2) 22... Bc5 23. Bc3 Rac8)

21... h6 (21... a5!) 22. Bxc6
bxc6 23. Raf1 Rad8?
{With a draw offer.  But this move is a blunder.}

24. g3?  (24. Bxa7!! c5 25. Bb6 Rd7 26. Rf3 Rb7 27. Qf2!! wins)

24... Bg5 25. Qe4 h5 26. Bc3  (26. Rf3 Rd7 (26... Qxa2 $2 27. Bc5) 27. Bg1) 26... Qc5 27. b4 Qe3 28. Qxe3 Bxe3 29. Rf3 Bd4 30. b5 {With a draw offer.}

It is equal in all lines so black accepts.  For example, 30...Bxc3 (30... cxb5 31. cxb5 Rd5 32. Bxd4 (32. Bb4 Bc5 33. Bc3 g5 34. a4) 32... Rxd4 33. Ra3 Rd5 34. Rxa7 Rxb5 35. a4 Rxe5 36. a5 Rf5 37. Rxf5 gxf5 38. a6 Rd8 39. Rc7 Rd1+ 40. Kg2 Rd2+ 41. Kg1 Ra2 42. a7 Kf6 43. Kh1 e5 44. Kg1 e4 45. Kf1 Ke6) 31. Rxc3 cxb5 (31... Rc8 32. a4) 32. cxb5 Rd5 33. a4 Rd4 34. Rf4

 

1/2-1/2


Question for chess.com readers:


What's the motivation behind 9...Bd7?  Should white allow the exchange of knights on d4?  Why or why not?

 

Game 2.
[Event "North American Open"]
[Site "Las Vegas, NV"]
[Date "2009.12.29"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Ginsburg, Mark"]
[Black "Dean, Jim"]

[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D34"]
 
[EventDate "2009.12.26"]
[EventRounds "7"]
[SourceDate "2009.12.30"]

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 e6 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 Be7 5. O-O c5 6. cxd5 exd5 7. d4 Nc6 8. Nc3
O-O 9. Bg5 cxd4 10. Nxd4 h6 11. Be3 Re8 12. Qb3! Na5 13. Qc2 Nc4 14. Bf4
{
White looks better here.  Black knight on c4 unstable.} Be6 15. Rad1 Qc8  (
15... Rc8 16. Nxe6 fxe6 17. Qg6 Kh8 18. b3 Nd6 19. Be5 {White better here too.}
)
16. Nxe6 fxe6 17. e4?  {A big lemon.} (17. b3 Nd6 18. Rc1 Rf8 19. Qd3 Qe8
20. Rfd1 Rc8 21. e4 Ndxe4 22. Nxe4 dxe4 23. Bxe4) (17. Qg6 Nxb2 18. Bxh6 Bf8
19. Rc1 Nc4 20. Bf4 Qc5 21. Rb1 b6 22. Nb5 Re7 23. Rfc1 Rf7 24. e4)
17... e5! 18. Bc1 d4 19. Nd5 Nd6 20. Qd3?  (The finesse 20. Qb3 Nc4 21. Qd3 Nxd5 22. exd5 Bf6 23. Qg6 Nd6 24. Bxh6 Qd7 25. Rfe1 Qf7 26. Qxf7+ Kxf7 27. Bd2)
20... Nxd5 21. exd5 Bf6! 22. Qg6 (22. Rfe1 Qd7 23. Bd2 Rac8 {Black is all right.})
22... Qf5 23. Qxf5 Nxf5 24. Be4 Nd6 25. Bg6 Re7 26. Rfe1 e4?? {Time pressure blunder}  27. Bf4 Be5 28. Bxe5 Rxe5
29. Rxd4 Rd8 30. Bxe4 Nxe4 31. Rexe4 Rxe4 32. Rxe4 Rxd5 33. Re7 Rb5 34. b3 a5
35. Kg2 a4 36. bxa4 Rb4 37. a5 Rb5 38. Re8+ Kh7 39. Ra8 Rb2 40. a6
{
Black resigned.} (40. a4 Ra2 41. a6 b6 42. Rb8 Rxa4 43. Rxb6) 40... b5 {
Suggested by an Indian 2470 player after the game as drawing.} 41. a4 {
Then I noticed this move.} 1-0
Comments to chess.com readers:  Notice Portisch's effective 12. Qb3! idea in the opening. After the bishop on e3 is chased by a black knight, that knight becomes unstable and white's bishop has fuond a happy new home on f4.
It is indeed true that testing black in the main lines is definitely best in such openings as the Tarrasch Defense.  White's setups have been refined by decades of top-level experience.  In the Spassky-Petrosian WC Match of 1969, Boris used the Tarrasch to great effect as black, surprising Tigran, but theory and the refined treatments (such as the Portisch idea) didn't exist back then.

Comments


  • 5 years ago

    Jpatrick

    I was there at 14:00 Pacific but the chat room was not enabled. 

  • 5 years ago

    IM dpruess

    very nice! looking forward to today's program which i'll be around to watch :)

Back to Top

Post your reply: