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K+2P vs K+2P Endings

Richard Réti (28 May 1889, Bösing (now Pezinok) – 6 June 1929, Prague) was an ethnic JewishAustrian-Hungarian, later Czechoslovakian chess player, chess author, and composer of endgame studies. He was born in Pezinok which at the time was in the Hungarian part of Austria-Hungary, where his father worked as a physician in the service of the Austrian military.

In 1925 Réti set, and for a time held, the world record for blindfold chess with twenty-nine games played simultaneously. He won twenty-one of these, drew six, and only lost two.

His writings have also become "classics" in the chess world. Modern Ideas in Chess (1923) and Masters of the Chess Board (1933) are still studied today.

Comments


  • 14 months ago

    sacking3

    Re first puzzle. 'I don't see an escape for white.  I've been known to be wrong though.'

    Condude, the error is earlier. I believe 5. e5 (not Kf3) is a draw.

  • 14 months ago

    NimzoRoy

    Looks good to me!

  • 14 months ago

    condude2

    Here:

    I don't see an escape for white.  I've been known to be wrong though.

  • 14 months ago

    NimzoRoy

    condude2 NImzoRoy, in the first puzzle after your continuation, does Qc7 not win for black?

    I don't see it - show me and I'll post it here



  • 14 months ago

    condude2

    NImzoRoy, in the first puzzle after your continuation, does Qc7 not win for black?

  • 15 months ago

    sacking3

    Re Duras 1927, Fritz says 3 Kc6(not Kc4) is winning for White. Anyhow Nimzo the work you have done is brilliant.

  • 15 months ago

    sacking3

    I can't see the win in Duras 1927, 3...Kxe2 is winning for Black. Do you agree?

  • 15 months ago

    sacking3

    Nimzo these are beautiful, thanks for posting. I agree first problem is a draw because the White King can go after the b pawn!

  • 19 months ago

    chessINDIA22

    funny continuation 

  • 2 years ago

    NimzoRoy

    re: J Pallas 1933 1/2 -1/2 (1st problem) elipb and fullscreen's comments

    I don't think White can gain a tempo after queening by forcing Black to play ...Kb8 occupying the queening square, so that White can advance his King to close in on a checkmate. 

    The book has 43 cooks but this problem isn't one of them...so far.

  • 2 years ago

    fullscreen

    I think elipb is right. The last move should be 8. Kf3 to hold the draw. Right?

  • 2 years ago

    elipb

    how is the first puzzle a draw? can't he just take the pawn and march his own down?

  • 2 years ago

    fullscreen

    Great stuff. Thanks for posting these incredible positions. Unbelievable and yet good to know.

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