Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

"He who hated draws", part 2

Janowski used King's Gambit against the aging Steinitz. Steinitz tried to refute it, Janowski counter-refuted, but then made a couple of inaccurate moves and lost.

 

Lasker already guaranteed himself the first prize and probably didn't mind a draw. Janowski tried an artificial castling, attacked with g- and h-pawns and finally even sacrificed an exchange. But Lasker still made his draw.
"A hallucination that cost 1250 francs! White could easily make a draw: they have the lines, they are better developed and have better perspectives. They just needed to be careful, but it's against Janowski's artistic, hot-tempered nature."
Janowski just needed to draw that game to get the 2nd place, but lost, and Maroczy and Pillsbury caught up with him. And Steinitz won his last ever tournament game.
Janowski had a beautiful, almost chess problem-like win against Maroczy, but instead blundered and lost in one move under time pressure.
Janowski had a very good game against Schlechter... and with two moves, ruined it, first missing a win, then - an opportunity to draw.
The decisive game of Cambridge Springs 1904 tournament. Janowski had a good attack against Marshall, squandered it in one move, then defended valiantly, but eventually lost in the endgame.

Comments


  • 2 years ago

    Spektrowski

    @ eatherquake

    After several more tragic games, I'll post his wins, of course. Against Steinitz, Lasker, Capablanca, Alekhine, to name a few.

    Janowski was almost as infamous for his losses as he was famous for his great wins (he was considered arguably the world's strongest player in 1903-04).

  • 2 years ago

    eatherquake

    And how about showing some of Janowski's win? He wasn't a bad player at all, and you seem to compare him to a total looser... :(

  • 2 years ago

    CHESSMANAGER

    thanks. more power to your elbow.

  • 2 years ago

    drunkennite

    @Petron

    Janowski - Maroczy:

    1. Ba7?? Bc4+ 2. Ke1 (2. Rd3 Bxd3+ 3. Kd1 Rc1++) Re2+ 3. Kd1 Reg2+ 4. Ke1 Rg1+ 5. Rxg1 Rxg1++

    Should be 3. Kf1.

    It seems that Janowski doesn't have a win in this position and that Rd3 was as good a try as any.

  • 2 years ago

    Spektrowski

    @Caliphigia

    Yes, Janowski was "very correct over the board and really obnoxious afterwards", as Ossip Bernstein put it.

    When he lost his first match against Marshall in 1905, he immediately offered to play another match, with 0:4 odds! Marshall jokingly agreed, but demanded the same sponsorship deal as for their first match, and it fell through.

    They eventually played three more matches (in 1908, 1912 and 1916), with Janowski winning the first of them and losing two others.

  • 2 years ago

    Caliphigia

    Perhaps it is mentioned in the first part of the article, but Yanovsky was a colleric by character and only interested in chess and games of chance. After he had lost the game he would call his opponents names (patzer etc) and the offer to play him with an odd of a pawn and move. When Amos Burn accepted the offer and won the match with 5:3, Yanovsky started offering knight odd!

    The game Yanovsky - Steinitz was played in the last round of the London tournament and was Steinitz's last tournament game. The legend says that after the game Steinitz chased Yanovsky to beat him with his cane. True to himself, Yanovsky offered a game with knight odd and Steinitz thought that such an offer is insulting.

  • 2 years ago

    Spektrowski

    @ pfren

    Seems that in Euwe's times, the evaluation of this position was different. And in Steinitz's times, even more different.

  • 2 years ago

    Petron

    Janowski - Maroczy:

    1. Ba7?? Bc4+ 2. Ke1 (2. Rd3 Bxd3+ 3. Kd1 Rc1++) Re2+ 3. Kd1 Reg2+ 4. Ke1 Rg1+ 5. Rxg1 Rxg1++

  • 2 years ago

    IM pfren

    Nice oldfashioned chess...

    But actually 3...Ne7 on game #1 is a fine move, not dubious, and played very frequently by many strong GM's.

    The dubious one is 4.Qh5?! which every schoolboy would today answer with the natural 4...d5 5.ed5 Nf5 or 5...Ng6 and White must already find a decent way to equalize.

  • 2 years ago

    Spektrowski

    And Janowski is always at the receiving end, and always with White!..

  • 2 years ago

    elbowgrease

    these are good games

Back to Top

Post your reply: