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"He who hated draws", special feature

Readers asked me to post some winning games by Dawid Janowski. So, here they are - some truly brilliant products of his imagination. These combinations are given as puzzles.

This game by the young Janowski was printed in many chess magazines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A good mating attack in the Cafe de la Regence championship.

 

This game was played blindfolded.

 

This game was played on "pawn-and-move" odds.

 

In 1896, Janowski played a match with his compatriot Winawer. That's how he won the first game.

 

The 38th (!) round of the Vienna marathon tournament. Janowski still has enough strength to land a devastating punch.

 

Janowski quickly exploits Schlechter's mistake.
Simultaneous display in Paris, 1900.

Comments


  • 2 years ago

    aviously

    Actually Spetrowski, supporting your comment to huzir, once white takes black's queen stopping the check, there is no response to avoid checkmate

  • 2 years ago

    Spektrowski

    huzir

    After 13... Qf4+ 14. Qxf4 Black has either to give up his Queen or get checkmated: 14... gxf4 (Nxf4) 15. Rd8#.

  • 2 years ago

    EyeKnows

    Friedman vs. Janowski is the most amazing combo I have ever seen, unreal.

  • 2 years ago

    huzir

    Janowski vs. Trenchard
    Tournament / Vienna
    Round 38 | 25 Jul 1898
    1-0
    In this game after 13 Rd7! Black can save the day with 13. .... Qf4!! and we can see that it was a pin!!.
  • 2 years ago

    Chess_Lover11

    Great!!!

  • 2 years ago

    Spektrowski

    @ batgirl

    There were 18 participants in the All-Russian Championship:

    Chigorin, Lebedev, Schiffers (St. Petersburg)

    Boyarkov, Frenkel, Genika, Goncharov, B. Grigoriev, Nenarokov, Sharov (Moscow)

    Janowski (Paris)

    Tabunschikov (Gatchina)

    Antushev (Kashin)

    Rosenkrantz (Libawa)

    Fokin (Kharkov)

    Duz-Chotimirsky (Kiev)

    Kulomzin (Kostroma)

    Alexeev (Rostov-on-Don), a pseudonym of a Jewish player Yankovich. He even refused to be included on the players' group photo.

  • 2 years ago

    iguna

    This is really amazing especially at that time they did not have a computer yet to analyze the game...

  • 2 years ago

    smorgaschord

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 2 years ago

    sicknero

    Lol I thought I was doing quite well getting most of his moves in example 2 ... then I saw "This game was played blindfolded."

    Some people eh.

  • 2 years ago

    Saif-F

    wonderful and genius ^^

  • 2 years ago

    highwatales

    pagal k bache

  • 2 years ago

    flashboy2222

    wonderful

  • 2 years ago

    Philipper

    genius

  • 2 years ago

    gabrielconroy

    Wow.

  • 2 years ago

    batgirl

    "He even took part in the Second All-Russian Tournament in early 1900s."

                                          1901 Moscow, 2nd All-Russian Championship

    The caption reads: "A group of participants from the second All-Russian tournament. At the chessboard E. S. Schiffers and   M. I. Tschigorin. Far left F. I. Duz-Chotimirsky."

    Standing:
    F.I. Duz-Chotimirsky, K.V. Rozenkrantz, D.M. Janowski, S.V. Lebedev, V.N. Kulomzin

    Seated:
    E. S. Schiffers, S.V. Antushev, V.I. Tabunshchikov, M.I. Tschigorin



  • 2 years ago

    NimzoRoy

    Great puzzles, esp after seeing several games Janowski lost because he was too intent on winning in drawn positions.

  • 2 years ago

    eatherquake

    Thank you Spektrowski :) Didn't see your last reply on the other thread!

  • 2 years ago

    RomaniTaS

    AMAZING GAMES!

  • 2 years ago

    Spektrowski

    Some of them he probably did. Janowski, despite living in France and USA for most of his life, remained a citizen of Russia and had good publicity there. He even took part in the Second All-Russian Tournament in early 1900s.

  • 2 years ago

    jpd303

    wow! nezmetdinov musta seen these games :)

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