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Learn the Practical Endgames

The endgame is considered the most complex stage of the game and being good at endgames often helps players improve their performance in other stages of the game, too. Nowadays, practical endgames are some of the most instructive training tools that are used by professional players to prepare and excel in serious chess tournaments. In today’s lecture, I focus on practical endgames and the importance of passed pawns in them. Pawns typically gain considerable value during the endgame and by advancing forward and forming different structures they can often become stronger than a couple of enemy’s pieces. It is only then when we can see how subtle one’s understanding of practical endgames should be to detect these position dynamics and take advantage of them at the right time. Enjoy!


Comments


  • 3 years ago

    blueparrot12345

    Definitely a practical endgame. If u looked at the starting position, it could seem like any normal endgame. The approach of thinking in the endgame is important

  • 3 years ago

    LaserZorin

    @ Splane

    I'm not FM Lilov, but I can answer these questions.

    "In the original position, does Black win with 1 ... Rd2 2. Na4 c3  3. bc Ra2 4. Nb6 Rb2 and 5. ... ab or is this just a draw? "

    After 4...Rb2?! (4...axb6 is better), White plays 5. Rxa7 Rxb6 and the position is drawn, albeit slightly better for White. 

    In the original position, does Black win with 1 ... Rd2 2. Na4 c3  3. bc Ra2 4. Nb6 Rb2 and 5. ... ab or is this just a draw?

    "In the position after 1. ... Rd2  2. Na4 Rb2  3. Nb2 c3  4. Rd6 c4   5. Rb4 a5 how does Black win after 6. Rc4 cb 7. a4 b1=Q+  8. Kh2?    It looks like White can play 9. Rg4 with a fortress draw. All he has to do is move his king around near the g2 pawn."

    This is an easy win for Black, not a draw. 

    Among a bunch of basic winning strategies, they can get their king to the queenside and then sacrifice their queen for the g4 rook, queening the a5 pawn first. 

  • 3 years ago

    EDMT

    What if white plays b4 in answer to Rd2? Very interesting!

  • 3 years ago

    Lawdoginator

    This is a famous game. I think it is in one of the Chess Mentor courses. 

  • 3 years ago

    Shibin123

    @GoMath1123 this game was played b/w polish players Tulkowski and Wojciewski some 60 years ago. 

    Great video.Great endgame.Thanx 4 the lesson.

    But I have an observation to make.If White plays 2.a4 to meet 2...R*b2 by 3.a5, wudnt the outcome have been different? 

  • 3 years ago

    glsmith

    This was amazing ! rethink the value of material by their position!

  • 3 years ago

    Chess_Lover11

    Awesome!
  • 3 years ago

    adi007bond

    gaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaame

  • 3 years ago

    adi007bond

    very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very good

  • 3 years ago

    rushi2011

    good game..

  • 3 years ago

    Adrenalyn

    @NM Splane:

    In the first line white has 5. Rxa7 to get a drawn rook endgame.

    In the second line, I believe the pawn endgame is winning for black after trading the queen for the rook due to the possibility of avoiding zugzwang by advancing the backward g pawn.

  • 3 years ago

    kingspasski

    was it any good? :)

  • 3 years ago

    kingspasski

    17 minutes on that endgame? i won,t have any credit left on my dongle!

  • 3 years ago

    RegicidalManiac

    Very Nice!!

  • 3 years ago

    AGirlFromArmenia

    Amazing game!Thanks very much.

  • 3 years ago

    GoMath1123

    Great video!! And I know he says it at the beginning, but could someone please tell me what game this was from?

  • 3 years ago

    NM Splane

    First off, I love your videos and recommend them to all of my chessplaying friends.

    I had a couple of questions and an observation.

    In the original position, does Black win with 1 ... Rd2 2. Na4 c3  3. bc Ra2 4. Nb6 Rb2 and 5. ... ab or is this just a draw? 

    In the position after 1. ... Rd2  2. Na4 Rb2  3. Nb2 c3  4. Rd6 c4   5. Rb4 a5 how does Black win after 6. Rc4 cb 7. a4 b1=Q+  8. Kh2?    It looks like White can play 9. Rg4 with a fortress draw. All he has to do is move his king around near the g2 pawn.

     If you define a weakness in the endgame as "a square that must be defended by a piece" it helps reveal many hidden weaknesses.  In the position after 1. ... Rd2  2. Na4 the b2 square is an obvious weakness. The second weakness is a bit harder to see; the c3-c2-c1 set of squares also must be guarded. At the moment the c3 square is the critical one to guaard.  After you spot this then it becomes clear that the knight is overloaded, it must guard both the b2 and c3 squares, and Black can start looking for a combination to deflect the knight.  I've found this approach to thinking about endgames to be quite useful for me.

  • 3 years ago

    Yinx

    Thanx for that great lesson! I enjoyed that video and i think it will improve my skills.

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