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Tigran L. Petrosian

As a comment to a recent posting of mine, "The OTHER Tal,"  Quix wrote:
          Interestingly this is not the only chess player this has
          happened to. There's a GM Tigran (L) Petrosian who's
          name is perhaps also a burden. It would be cool to see
          a Batgirl blog on the other Petrosian in the future. :)

In reality one would have to look to the past.  In 2004 I put out a short article using some information I had stumbled across in New In Chess. I called that article Botvinnik vs Petrosian - 1998?

Briefly, it went:

Mikhail Botvinnik, born in 1984 in Belarus, emigrated to Israel with his family.

Tigran Petrosian, born in 1983, lives in Yerevan.

Mikhail Botvinnik played Tigran Petrosian on Board 4 in the match between Israel and Armenia during the Children's Olympiad.

White plays OK for a kid, but Black is a Terror.

Neither of them are related to their famous namesakes.

(It turns out that New in Chess was wrong. Tigran L. Petrosian was born in 1984 (September 17), the same year that his namesake, Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian, died). By the time the below game was played, Tigran L. had been the U-14 Armenian Champion twice. The below game was played in the Under-16 Olympiads in Turkey - which Tigran's team won.

The game:

 

from a 2005 interview with Misha Savinov, Tigran L. noted:

". . .Yes, my father is a big fan of chess, so when Petrosian defeated Botvinnik, he decided to name his future son after the champion. Naturally, he also wanted me to become a chess player.

. . .

"At 18 years old I didn’t have an international title, but I set myself a goal of qualifying for the GM title in two years. It took 16 months to meet the first IM and GM requirements.

"My first GM norm was completed at the U18 world championship in 2002. The second was recorded at the 2003 Batumi Open, and the last occurred at the 2004 Aeroflot Open. There was nothing dramatic about them, I think I played well and got just what I deserved."


In 2002, Tigran L. became the U-18 Armenian Champion.
In 2004, he placed second in the U-20 World Championship in India.
In 2005, he tied for first in an open international held in Iran - and another held in Batumi.
In 2006, he shared 4th-7th place in the Aeroflot Open; and 1st-3rd at both Dubai and Lausanne, while winning outright an open tornament at Lyon.
In 2007, he became Champion of Calcutta.
In May, 2008, Tigran L. placed 2nd in the Chicago Open after a tie-breaking game with Varuzhan Akobian. 
 


It seems Tirgan L. is an Armenian Tiger, just like that other Tigran.

 

Comments


  • 4 years ago

    drawdover

    Haha! history repeat itself. Thanks batgirl for this amazing facts!

  • 6 years ago

    Quix

    Wow, I didn't know about Petrosian vs Botvinnik - 1998. Crazy.

  • 6 years ago

    kenytiger

    Amazing!!

  • 6 years ago

    chessdadx3

    Your posts are always interesting and amazing!!!

  • 6 years ago

    oginschile

    In 50 years someone by the call sign of "Batgirl" will pick up a history niche on a chess blog somewhere, and will forever live in your shadow!

    Names are a funny thing. It's not uncommon at all to be named after someone of great importance, and I've always wondered if those named after someone ever feel the weight of expectation. If they ever feel the gentle pull to follow in their namesake's footsteps.

    Being a rather ordinary person myself, it seems a surefire recipe for failure. I'd rather blaze my trails in the fields of mediocrity. But who knows what future Oginschile's will feel the weight of my legend, and where they will take my name.

    What idiot would name their child Oginschile is another story.

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