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Canadian Open - The Remix

Hey everyone :)

I'd like to present for your viewing pleasure my round 8 win against IM Lawrence Day in this, a second, blog.  This time I've done my homework, annotated my thoughts about the game, provided variations, and even explained a few instructive ideas.  It's much easier to provide a good blog when you aren't distracted by round 9.  

I hope you like this one :)

-Matt :)

Comments


  • 3 years ago

    NM ih8sens

    ! = Good move.  In my opinion 5. ... d5! was the best move.  The more I research it the more I realize (quite accidentally) that I was probably right.  At any rate, the move is much better than one would originally suspect and is definitely a "good move".  I stand by my annotation.

  • 3 years ago

    fish_food

    Sour grapes? Not at all. Everybody can appreciate a well-played victory, and everybody can appreciate a well annotated game.

    I was just reacting to the original annotations. The original suggestion was 6... Nd5 7. Nc3!? when in fact the most popular and challenging line (at the moment anyway) appears to be 7. exd6 Qxd6 and in fact, if you have chessbase 2011, 7.exd6 has the highest percentage of white success and is notated as 'hot'. Spragget is undaunted by this line, which is why I mentioned him. But in any case, the move 7.Nc3 is seldom played. Chessbase 2011, for what it is worth, gives a 44% winning rate for white...white scores badly. This does not necessarily mean anything, since you have to look at the games and the players and not just the statistics. Weak players and games can skew the statistics...which is why I mention Spragett, he has 2 draws and 1 win against the line.

     If you don't want your mistakes pointed out, perhaps you should not put them on the internet for everybody to see.

  • 3 years ago

    SWRR2009

    Although fish makes some interesting and I believe true points, he seems to be suffering a bit from sour grapes. No need to be jealous, this is a pretty big win for a seriously improving player. No need to pick and choose over exlamations - nit picking.

  • 3 years ago

    NM ih8sens

    I didn't load chessbase for this, but the chess.com game's explorer is showing 11 games (including the spraggett one) played in the position both Tiviakov and Spraggett reached by move 9.  Spraggett should have lost that game but managed to draw when his much weaker opponent missed the correct plan.  The other 10 games were all won by white.  

    Clearly I'm in no position to say that the g6 Alekhine's is "refuted" or anything... but this blog has always been about improving my chess and the chess of those who follow it... knowing how to cause an Alekhine's player a ton of practical problems is a useful piece of information to me.  

    To be honest your evaluation of += or perhaps a little more for white sounds about right to me too... I just wonder if black has any ideas to counteract the g4 idea that could have shown up in spraggett's game and did show up in Tiviakov's. 

    Ps - Spraggett plays questionable stuff all the time :P, just wanted to point that out lol.

    Guess I'll pull rybka out and bounce some ideas off it tomorrow.  Thanks for the comment.

    -matt

  • 3 years ago

    fish_food

    Hey, you can believe what you want.

    6 e5 Nd5 has many GM's playing the black side in the 2011 chessbase. Spragget for example seems quite happy to defend the black side. White should get little more than his normal theoetical edge of +/=

    On the other hand, a higher rated player will sometimes prefer not to play forcing lines against lower rated players...(such as ...d5) simply for the reason he wants to leave the maximum amount of choices  and complexity in the position which can cause the lower rated player to consume time on the clock and also increases the chance the player will pick the wrong variation.

  • 3 years ago

    NM ih8sens

    @ Fish_food.  A little bit of digging in my database seems to confirm my belief in black's move order.  An immediate d5 (as occured in the game) forces the variation which occurred in the game.  Whether black should fully equalize there is up for debate.  On the other hand, 5. ... Nf6 allows white two extra options.  White may play the razor sharp 6. Qe2, as I had intended to during the game... with an interesting, albeit roughly equal, position.  OR, white may play 6. e5! creating a strange transposition into an Alekhine's defense sideline that few GM's have been willing to try as black in the past decade (outside of rapid/blindfold matches).  

    In the Botvinnik game, his IM opponent played complacently with 6. Nc3 and after 6. ... d5 7. Bd3 Bg4 8. e5 Nfd7 9. h3 Bxf3 10. Qxf3 e6, black achieved a great position with no bad pieces, no weaknesses, and rough equality.  (Van Scheltinga - Botvinnik 1958).

    Although I do not know the latest theory on the 6. Qe2 or 6. e5 plans, I believe black made the correct practical choice by limiting my options.  In addition, 6. e5 has scored incredibly well for white and so I am inclined to believe there is a definite advantage to white there (although I certainly do not have the analysis to prove it!).  

    Either way, I prefer Day's move.  d5 forces me to react to his threat, limiting my options.  In this case, because of what I'd consider a favourable Alekhines transposition, limiting my options was definitely more than just an alternative choice.

    Edit - See Tiviakov - De Firmian (2009) for an interesting game (played via the Alekhine's move order).  It appears that with so many pieces on the board, black's lack of space might be an issue.

    Edit #2 - Fargere - Spraggett (2009), Another interesting Alekhine's game where the idea of stealing the only good square from the c8 bishop with the move g4 (As Tiviakov used) should have provided white with a winning advantage as early as move 15!  Fascinating stuff.  I can't find anything better than a black draw.  I wonder if there are resources here for black's position.

    -matt

  • 3 years ago

    fish_food

    5...d5 exclam? Really?

     Botvinnik (and others) played 5...Nf6 instead of 5...d5.

  • 3 years ago

    Fouracle

    Good work!

  • 3 years ago

    SWRR2009

    Nice job Matthew,

    A big crush that shows your best skills. I think you kept the f7 square in mind for a long time and this kept you focused, finding 6.Bb3! for instance. Lawrence Day is no slouch, though it seems he very critically over-rated his attack against d4 versus your development advantage.

    Nice attacking moves (e.g. Ng3, Bg5, Qf3 and eventual c4 and d5), prophylatic moves (e.g. Qe2, c3) and master level play.

    Well done!

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