Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Petrosian, Tigran Vartanovich

  • Last updated on 8/10/07, 5:52 AM.

  • Send to friend
  • | 28 reads
  • | 8 comments

Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian (1929-1984) was a Soviet Grandmaster (1952) and 9th world chess champion (1963-1969).  Between 1968 and 1975 he never lost more than a single game in any tournament.  He drew more than half his total games of chess, a higher fraction than any other World Champion.  He received less than $2,000 for winning the world chess championship in 1966 against Spassky.  When Petrosian defeated Spassky in 1966, it was the first time a World Champion defeated his challenger in 32 years (Alekhine defeated Bogoljubov in 1934).  In 1972 at the Skopje Olympiad he lost a game on time to Hubner, his first loss on time in his whole career.  When he was later told that the incident had been shown on TV, he said, "If I had known that, I would definitely have smashed the clock."  His first official match that he played was for the World Championship, which he won when he defeated Botvinnik in 1963.  When he lost his match with Fischer in 1971, Petrosian's wife, Rona, put the blame on his trainer, Alexey Suetin, and slapped him.  Petrosian was unbeaten in 6 USSR championships.   He only lost one game out of 129 in chess Olympiad play.  Before Rona married Petrosian, she was flirting and dating both Efim Geller and Tigran Petrosian.  In 1952, when both players went to Sweden for the Interzonal, she said she would marry whoever performed better in the Interzonal.  Petrosian finished ½ point better than Geller, and Petrosian and Rona Avinezer were later married.  In 1964, he won the championship of the Trade Unions in Moscow.

Comments


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #1

    artur74blef

    Tigran Petrosyani cave tanem!


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #2

    Lousy

    One of the best defensive all-time players.
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    bambam101

    he had a really good end game you have to understand principles

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #4

    IronTigran4469

    Arguably the hardest player ever to beat in chess, as his defense was almost impenetrable.  Bobby Fischer himself said that he could "smell" danger 20 moves ahead!

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #5

    KingKeres

    He had an impregnable defense that literally ward off complex plans before they even happened. However, his openess to accept draws easily has often exposed him to harsh criticism. Some, certain world champions included, even consider him cowerdly in his games. Be that as it may, at times, he initiated extremely dangerous attacks that parralleled those of the mighty Tal. All in all, most grandmasters of his time found it excessively difficult to win a game against Tigran Petrosian, an effect that earned him the name Iron Tigran!

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #6

    Roma60

    he was a great champ the book petrosian v the elite is well worth getting.

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #7

    Anjo_Medel_Benzon

    he is one of my idol. :)

Back to Top

Post your reply: