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Chronos repair


  • 14 months ago · Quote · #61

    goldendog

    mldavis617 wrote:

    Occasionally there are a few comments about how difficult it is to program the Chronos.  With all due respect, I learned in about 10 minutes with the manual and I'm a below average player and nearly 70.  I can't imagine anyone who is smart enough to play decent chess who would have any trouble.  There are 4 user modes.  Most chess tournaments are limited to about four common time controls.  Set 'em and forget 'em.

    Ditto. I've also taped a cheat sheet to the bottom. Chronos isn't hard to set if you are a little familiar with it.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #62

    azbobcat

    mldavis617 wrote:

    Occasionally there are a few comments about how difficult it is to program the Chronos.  With all due respect, I learned in about 10 minutes with the manual and I'm a below average player and nearly 70.  I can't imagine anyone who is smart enough to play decent chess who would have any trouble.  There are 4 user modes.  Most chess tournaments are limited to about four common time controls.  Set 'em and forget 'em.

    Actually there are 12 user definable modes, but who's counting? For most people  4 modes is more than enough. Given that I no longer play in tournaments, my time controls are all skittles: #1: G/15, no delay; #2: G/30, no delay; #3: G/45, no delay; #4: 40/2,SD/60. d5. My  "Backup Chronos" is set for "Fischer" Time Controls: #1: 40/90, SD/30, inc/30; #2: G/60, inc/30; #3: 40/2, SD/60, d5; #4: G/45, no delay

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #63

    mldavis617

    Thanks, @azbobcat.  Never had to dig that deeply into the manual.  I've only had to use two of the customized time control formats.  The others are default.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #64

    azbobcat

    For most people 2, maybe 3 preset time controls will suffice. On my -- what is now -- "skittles clock" except  for the final time control, which is  clearly a tournamnet time control, it's setup to move a game along. My "Back-up Chronos" which I bought when it  seemed there would be no more made and which I bought for a good price, has the two  "Fisher" Time Controls which I programed for my "student" when we were not sure his clock could do Fisher time controls, but really you  could program almost every time control you would likely come across, including skittles and blitz time controls, as you can store up to 12 user modes -- that's a lot!!! Programming the Chronos is not that  hard. What is hard is find which mode you  need to modify, if at all, and then saving it to one of the 12 user defined modes. Once you modify -- if necessary -- a mode and save it to one of your user defined modes, once you turn on your clock, all you need  to do   is cycle through  your modes by  pressing  the red center button. It is without a doubt the easiest clock in the world to operate. Good Luck to you.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #65

    Fish-Killer

    About being the easiest clock in the world to program I strongly disagree with you.

    azbobcat wrote:

    For most people 2, maybe 3 preset time controls will suffice. On my -- what is now -- "skittles clock" except  for the final time control, which is  clearly a tournamnet time control, it's setup to move a game along. My "Back-up Chronos" which I bought when it  seemed there would be no more made and which I bought for a good price, has the two  "Fisher" Time Controls which I programed for my "student" when we were not sure his clock could do Fisher time controls, but really you  could program almost every time control you would likely come across, including skittles and blitz time controls, as you can store up to 12 user modes -- that's a lot!!! Programming the Chronos is not that  hard. What is hard is find which mode you  need to modify, if at all, and then saving it to one of the 12 user defined modes. Once you modify -- if necessary -- a mode and save it to one of your user defined modes, once you turn on your clock, all you need  to do   is cycle through  your modes by  pressing  the red center button. It is without a doubt the easiest clock in the world to operate. Good Luck to you.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #66

    azbobcat

    Fish-Killer, the Chronos IS NOT the easiest to PROGRAM -- it took a lot of cussing etc. for me to figure out the HOW, but once you discover the HOW, it really is not that hard. Probably the HARDEST part is knowing WHICH MODE needs to be modified, if it needs to be modified, and  saving it to one of the 12 USER DEFINED MODES. I think I read that there are some 200+ modes that the clock can access. It is this vast number of modes which makes it the most versatile clock on the market, and it is this large number of modes which can make it a programing nightmare, but  the actual programing itself is not all  that difficult, once you lean the HOW. In short Hang Onto Your Manual, as it  lists  all those modes. Case in point, was when my "student" told me that the  US Am West Tournament was going to be using a Fisher Time Control. While I did not know WHICH MODE would be needed  to be modified, I WAS  ABSOLUTELY POSITIVE it could be programed for a Fisher Time Control. Once the mode was identified, the actual programing itself was not that hard.  Don't confuse my statement about the PROGRAMMING  of the Chronos with my statement about OPERATING the Chonos. Without a doubt, once you have set up your User Defined Modes, the Chronos IS ONE of EASIEST TO OPERATE. Once your user defined modes are set all you  have to  do is press the center button -- no  hagling of first having to switch the thing off etc., etc, etc. Hopfully that carifies my statement somewhat.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #67

    mldavis617

    I must agree with @azbobcat on this.  Sometimes, for a new returning player (as I am), you have to catch up on definitions.  Fischer Time Control meant nothing to me until someone advised me whether it was a delay or an add-on mode.  Then you find the appropriate mode code Smile  in the manual, click to that mode and adjust (if needed) the time and delay and store it.  Chronos uses names like Allegro and Adagio which show up on the LED as cryptic "CH-1" and such which is admittedly confusing, but once you understand the difference, it's simple enough.  Once stored as a user defined setting, just turn the clock on and it's ready to go at the last setting with no resetting needed during a tournament.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #68

    Javan64

    I just carry the instructions in the case with the Cronos; this makes it very simple to make any changes to the programming.  OTOH, now that I've basically quit OTB tourneys (a long story), it's all a moot point anyway.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #69

    PiFischer

    Got my Chronos back in 16 weeks.  Seems like the display is no longer flickering, and I can see new screws indicating Sam took a look inside the clock.  I can still hear a moving part inside, dancing around, but I suppose it is not affecting the clock's ability to keep time.

    All in all, maybe purchasing a new clock was a slightly better alternative, albeit more expensive.  I'm satisfied my 7 year-old Chronos is still working for now... Thanks to SamTimer for fixing the display.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #70

    whitegs

    My clock came back (for the third time) dead as a doornail out of the box. Sam said he'd send me a pre-paid mailer to return it once again, but I simply can't trust it any more. I can imaging going away for a tournament and finding a dead clock. I like the other clocks I have - all working fine. I have an Excalibur, a DGT NA, and a new ZMF-II black with green display. I keep sending back the Chronos hoping against hope that maybe it can be fixed eventually but I don't have high hopes.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #71

    mldavis617

    It sounds as if there is a loose connection or circuit board crack somewhere that is not being found, or some shipping damage occuring on return.  Why would Sam waste money returning a dead clock if it was working when he fixed it (or thought he had fixed it)?  I had a TV once that did that - always worked on the bench and didn't work when I got it back home.  Turned out to be a hairline crack in the circuit board.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #72

    whitegs

    He claims they replaced the circuit board.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #73

    TitanCG

    I've heard stories of TDs having trouble with them when they were new. And TDs probably required to be able to use all the settings available.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #74

    ChronosDealer-com

    Happy New Year from ChronosDealer.com
    Very good news: We've caught up with backlogs and parts back-orders. Chronos clocks are repaired and sent back quickly these days.
    http://chronosdealer.com/repairs.html 
    Encourage your friends to send their nonworking clocks very soon, as it is difficult to predict how long this wonderful situation will continue! 

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #75

    determinacy

    The ZMF & DGT chess clocks are the most popular nowadays. Buy now @ ChessPDX! 


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