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computer software types and uses


  • 10 months ago · Quote · #21

    EscherehcsE

    billlearns wrote:

    OK I figured out how to see the engines in my fritz 8 There's one called crafty, one called comet and 3 types of fritz ones. Is there really any difference in these or are they just listed in order of strength? Thanks again.

    They're just engines of slightly different strengths. The Fritz 8 engine should be the strongest, although Crafty might be close.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #22

    EscherehcsE

    billlearns wrote:

    Thankyou to everyone who has answered. You all have certainly been helpful in assisting me to gain a foundation in this area, which I hope will help me. I just looked at the "File, New, Handicap and Fun" and I see that it does have different personality and settings. Cool. I appreciate all the help!

    Does anyone have any good suggestions as to how I can use fritz 8 as a learning tool? Other than simply playing it. (And yes I hear you about playing people online here )

    Also does anyone have any good recomendations for instructional dvd's. I viewed some by Susan Polgar from our public library and they really didn't go into much about the thought process of the moves shown IE the why's. I also tried viewing Kasparovs QGD dvd and it was just him talking of what seemed like endless lines of variations, but not covering the why behind the moves. Both dvd's were informative in their own way, but I'm trying to figure out a way to systematically think OTB that will help me to play better games. IE not get killed so quickly or easily. Thanks. 

    Fritz 8 as a learning tool? I doubt if it's going to be real helpful there, although it does have some opening and endgame training features (Tools, training). In general, chess programs don't make very good learning tools. (The Chessmaster tutorials for beginners and novices would be one exception to that rule.)

    I'm a book kinda guy, not a DVD guy, so I can't really help you there.

    You might try going to Dan Heisman's web site to visit his Novice Nook columns. There's probably more info there than you'd ever be able to read, ranging from beginner to advanced intermediate.

    Dan's main page:  http://home.comcast.net/~danheisman/Main_Chess/chess.htm

    Dan's Novice Nook page:  http://home.comcast.net/~danheisman/Articles/Novice_Nook_Links.htm

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #23

    hicetnunc

    I honestly recommend that you stay away from chess engines at the start of your chess journey.

    Using chess engines to improve your play is a bit like watching pro tennis on TV to work on your serve Wink

    You'll find some good use for them a bit later in your chess development... Smile

    Have a look at this thread, and judge for yourself if the OP (who's not a beginner) benefits from his chess engine "help"...

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #24

    HappyUngulate

    One area where practicing with an engine can really be useful even at beginner level is playing out simple theoretical endgames such as mating a lone king with a king and a queen or a king and a rook. You have to do that a few times to really get the hang of it and few human training partners will be willing to play the defending side over and over again. Once you're a bit more advanced you can play out non-theoretical endings where you have to convert a substantial advantage instead.

    PS: I *STILL* screw up King and Queen vs. King and Knight every now and then...

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #25

    hicetnunc

    HappyUngulate wrote:

    One area where practicing with an engine can really be useful even at beginner level is playing out simple theoretical endgames such as mating a lone king with a king and a queen or a king and a rook. You have to do that a few times to really get the hang of it and few human training partners will be willing to play the defending side over and over again. Once you're a bit more advanced you can play out non-theoretical endings where you have to convert a substantial advantage instead.

    PS: I *STILL* screw up King and Queen vs. King and Knight every now and then...

    Agreed.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #26

    mldavis617

    I use the engine only as an analytical tool following a game.  Often I only have time to review my losses.  Other than that, playing here is great practice, and you won't find many cheaters at our level.

    One outrageously large source of videos is on YouTube, but don't rely on videos for serious learning.  I use them as a diversion from serious book work.  But here are some group suggestions from YouTube.  You'll have to register but it's free, and then you can locate the groups easily:

    Bobby Fischer (this is Aww-Rats from here on Chess.com - hundreds of games analyzed)

    STLChessclub (some GM analysis of games for the St. Louis Chess Club audience)

    kingscrusher

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #27

    DunnoItAll

    Videos are not inherently inferior to books for presenting material.  It is all about how you choose to use the material.  If you watch videos without engaging your brain but you read books with brain fully engaged, that is not the video's fault.


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