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How to learn chess properly


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #1

    Neslanovac

    Is there a book that is writen by authority on the theme. Some "official russian chess school program" from which you can have the right approach from the start and learn the game properly.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #2

    bogart21

    I am actually wondering much the same thing, it seems like chess lessons jump around too much for a beginner.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #3

    shon615

    there really isn't ONE book (as far as i know) to learn the whole game of chess. I know this because i have gone through the process of learning the game from scratch and actually being pretty good at it.

    Neslanovac: looking at your live rating, i would say you are a pretty good player - better than myself. 

    Bogart: it seems to me that you also have some experience in the game, just need some refining.

    This is what i started out with for openings: World Champion Openings by Eric Schiller. I really like this guy because he makes really good books on openings and his analysis is very good. 

    http://www.amazon.com/World-Champion-Openings-Eric-Schiller/dp/1580422535/ref=tmm_pap_title_0

    For endgames and checkmates, I would recommend How to beat your dad at chess by Murray Chandler. I like this book becuase he thorughly explains 50 mating strategies and also some moves that lead up to them. I would also recommend his other book on chess tactics becuase it also explains a lot of the popular tactics. 

    http://www.amazon.com/How-Beat-Your-Chess-Gambit/dp/1901983056/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1333900442&sr=1-1

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    shon615

    Another good publishing company is everyman chess. They publish really good books with amazing analysis and great stuff. I like their series on openings called "starting out:..." The only problem that i find with these books is that they tend to be pretty expensive and sometimes cost can get in the way. 

    if you are looking for a good series on how to learn the basics and some other stuff, then i think a series called "Winning chess..." is a very good one. All of the books are by Yasser Seirawan and as explained above, have great analysis on basic things like tactics, moves, checkmates, openings, and just chess in general. 

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_4?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=yasser+seirawan&sprefix=yass%2Cstripbooks%2C144

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #5

    shon615

    paulgottlieb wrote:

    Chess is not English Grammar or Calculus, and you can't study it that way. The major component of any chess learning program will be playing lots of games.

    The reason chess lessons seem to jump around is that there are many separate chess skills, and the beginning player has to learn a little bit of each of them. You have to learn a bit of tactics, elementary mates and how to queen a pawn, a little grasp of strategy, and an introduction to the ideas behind the openings. And these all have to be taught more or less at once, if the student is going to be able to play with some hope of success.

    He is correct, you can never study chess like math or science or anything like it. For chess, you need lots of determination and strategic thinking skills. Usually, going to chess lessons for the first few months/year will help a lot in securing the understanding of basic skills. Then, the only thing that will help you is regular practice in chess tourneys under pressure. If you have a local chess tournament that has a tourney every weekend like i do, great, go there once in a while. If not, then keep playing on this site and just keep practicing. that is what really helps.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #6

    Neslanovac

    This is exactly the problem:Jumping around. I learn by my self from varios sorces and can play a decent tournament game with 2000 E but we all waste to much time on irelevant stuff while the important is neglected. I am 99 % convicted that IT SHOULD be learned like math, since the famous Botvinik school regards it as moustly the science( of geometry at first) And there must be some logical ,experience proved plan, of how it should be done. Where you start and where you finish. I am looking for that. Of course,the game is so complexed that every person have some ideas of how it should be learned. Me too.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #7

    adamredsox24

    Hey everyone. I think its interesting to see all of the resources out there to learn about chess. it really depends on your level and age of how you want to grasp chess. i have a chess camp but i can give a few pointers.. what levels are you?

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #8

    bohardus

    From good commented games you can learn also. Some comments are very uesfull.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #9

    Ziryab

    bobby Fischer teaches chess

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #10

    _Ravin

    You canb only learn so much from chess books, only the very basic principles, tactics and a few dif openings. Though if you were going to, i would recommend looking at some chess problem books. They can be very advanced for most good players, but it will improve your game a lot. And study a lot of endgames

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #11

    chessnaivete

    love the  game first.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #12

    shon615

    chessnaivete wrote:

    love the  game first.

    she is absolutely right. Also, if you don;t have one yet, get a chess engine. I posted one on the downloads section of this website:

    http://www.chess.com/download/view/deep-rybka-41

    the engine can also help you out with some games and tell you what you did wrong and what you should have done. Also, in the fritz GUI, it makes variations for you and tells you whole chunks of moves. 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #13

    transpo

    There is no one proper way to learn chess or any subject.  Almost every individual human being that has a brain learns a subject in a unique way that fits the way her/his brain is wired. 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #14

    e4nf3

    The best way to learn chess properly is to remember to say "please", "thank you" and to dress for the occasion.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #15

    Neslanovac

    Now,since I solve my problem I will write this for ones that have the same desire. Prof. Z. Jurković from the best Croatian chess school Goranka was kinde enough to give me a scriptes of russian schools from which some are published as books such as: E. Gufeljd High school of chess and similar which clearly state that in learning (and playing) you have to have a plan. As one player  said: Bad plan is better than no plan at all. Love for the game is the first reason to start to work on it properly. Interesting all have the same way,just in fiew variations on the same theme. Do your self a favor and ,if you are interested, ask authority on subject. I know that people here with FM and IM titles are selling they knowlege to pick up fiew dollars but there are other ways.


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