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i want my exitemant to be vanished


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    bpavan

    i want my exitement to be vanished because when ever i am winning i make a blunder help me

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    Bronco70

    Slow down. When you see the move that your going to do STOP! Count to 20 while looking for a better move and look to see which of you pieces are unprotected.
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    boymaster

    ...What happens when you are about to lose..? Make a brilliant move and win? Smile


    Ok but seriously. Don't take it too far. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    browni3141

    smellslikestinks wrote:
    bpavan wrote:

    i want my exitement to be vanished because when ever i am winning i make a blunder help me


    At 14 years old, which is how old you are NOW,  the mere thought of a surprise quiz at school , often ended my excitement . Just think of that .


    Oooh, I love pop quizzes!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    EricDodson

    Excitement is basically driven by our attachments to the outcomes we're anticipating. While that's natural enough, sometimes it's paradoxically the very thing that gets in the way of attaining what we want in life -- a phenomenon you seem to be discovering.  The best way I've found of letting go of that kind of attachment is through practicing meditation. Fortunately, you live in a country that has a rich tradition in that sort of thing.  You might want to look into it.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    die0003

    yeah i understand like i get there queen out and im wining by way far and like 2 moves later they check my king and get queen out with the horse, but i won just 1 sec on clock ;)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    AndyClifton

    EricDodson wrote:

    Excitement is basically driven by our attachments to the outcomes we're anticipating. While that's natural enough, sometimes it's paradoxically the very thing that gets in the way of attaining what we want in life -- a phenomenon you seem to be discovering.  The best way I've found of letting go of that kind of attachment is through practicing meditation. Fortunately, you live in a country that has a rich tradition in that sort of thing.  You might want to look into it.


    Well, that certainly made my excitement vanish.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    AndyClifton

    ...which will also make your wallet vanish.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    nameno1had

    bpavan wrote:

    i want my exitement to be vanished because when ever i am winning i make a blunder help me


    It can take time to deal with anxiety while playing chess. Literally, sometimes its best to take a load off if you aren't playing a short timed game. I often even walk away from a half hour game for five minutes just to give my mind a break.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    AndyClifton

    Maybe you just weren't good at it. Smile

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    nameno1had

    AndyClifton wrote:

    Maybe you just weren't good at it. 


    I think the opposite was true, I was too good at it....I was so good at it that, I used to have managers and supervisors who saw what I was capable of, they knew what I was up to and they would never let me get drug tested or turn me in. I could out work and out think most people on it( I have come to learn,it isn't hard to out work or out think most people at work) yet as high strung as I was, I was in the zone, but with out all the tension. I wasted a lot of money, time(years I can't get back) and I have memory problems that could end up horrible when I am elderly. I have seen what people are like when they get Alzheimer's disease. I didn't find much humor in watching a friend of our family eat dog food and have to have her diaper changed because she forgot how to properly eat and s#!t .

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    Michael-G

    To be an outstanding chess player , you must not only be a very good player , you must also have nerves of steel.You must not feel excitement when you win or disappointment when you lose.You must play the best you can in every case. The only help we can offer you is let you do it by yourself ,because you must do it by yourself , if you can't , you will never be nothing more than just good.

        

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    bpavan

    guys my age is 9 not 14 ok!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    Marcus-101

    Michael-G wrote:

    To be an outstanding chess player , you must not only be a very good player , you must also have nerves of steel.You must not feel excitement when you win or disappointment when you lose.You must play the best you can in every case. The only help we can offer you is let you do it by yourself ,because you must do it by yourself , if you can't , you will never be nothing more than just good.

     


    lol Michael i kinda half-agree with that. I know i am not a great chess player so please take my advice as a pinch of salt bpavan, but i think to become a good chess player you do have to the work yourself, that does not mean if a GM came and tutored you for a year, you would still be at the same level as you started, but if you are forced into the game by parents, family, whoever, whatever, or are not motivated to play the game, if a GM taught you how to play and explained everything to you but you did not enjoy it then you would not understand it and forget most things that were taught.

    But here is when i start to disagree with Michaels point. If you feel nothing when you win or lose then what is the point in playing??? I'm not sure about everyone else but i play cause it makes me feel intelligent and happy when i win but when i lose i feel dissapointed and have an urge to try harder next time.

    So back to your main point, how to avoid blunders. Play slow games, i have practically completely stopped plaing live chess so i can focus on my online games and really think about every move. Sometimes though i do get lazy, especially in unrated games and am trying to cut that out. So yea, good luck trying to stop ur blunders and i hope you take into account my advice :)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    Michael-G

    MarcazzarSmish wrote:
    Michael-G wrote:

    To be an outstanding chess player , you must not only be a very good player , you must also have nerves of steel.You must not feel excitement when you win or disappointment when you lose.You must play the best you can in every case. The only help we can offer you is let you do it by yourself ,because you must do it by yourself , if you can't , you will never be nothing more than just good.

     


    lol Michael i kinda half-agree with that. I know i am not a great chess player so please take my advice as a pinch of salt bpavan, but i think to become a good chess player you do have to the work yourself, that does not mean if a GM came and tutored you for a year, you would still be at the same level as you started, but if you are forced into the game by parents, family, whoever, whatever, or are not motivated to play the game, if a GM taught you how to play and explained everything to you but you did not enjoy it then you would not understand it and forget most things that were taught.

    But here is when i start to disagree with Michaels point. If you feel nothing when you win or lose then what is the point in playing??? I'm not sure about everyone else but i play cause it makes me feel intelligent and happy when i win but when i lose i feel dissapointed and have an urge to try harder next time.

    So back to your main point, how to avoid blunders. Play slow games, i have practically completely stopped plaing live chess so i can focus on my online games and really think about every move. Sometimes though i do get lazy, especially in unrated games and am trying to cut that out. So yea, good luck trying to stop ur blunders and i hope you take into account my advice :)


    I never said , feel nothing when you win or lose , I said feel nothing when you play.You can feel as happy as you like when the game finish.Controlling your feelings is part of the game , like it or not .And you will be more happy agter the game if you know that you don't only played well but you also managed to control your feelings during the game and secure the win with precise and calm moves.

       There is a reason why we say that "the toughest is to win the won game"

    One of the most great teachers ever(Botvinik) used to say that "when a chessplayer is at any kind of  positional advantage , he is at an emotional disadvantage".Learning to avoid that emotional disadvantage  will make you even more happy but......after the game, ALWAYS after the game.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #16

    Marcus-101

    lol yea :)

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #17

    AndyClifton

    bpavan wrote:

    guys my age is 9 not 14 ok!


    That's still no excuse.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #18

    Bronco70

    ^ yeah what he said. ;)

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