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Most Amazing Chess Book


  • 19 months ago · Quote · #61

    Ziryab

    Chigosian50 wrote:

    Emanuel Lasker's Manual of Chess is very profound in case you want to get inside the head of a world champion!

    It is a terrific book!

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #62

    nimzovitch2013

    I think Understanding Chess Tactics by Martin Weteschnik deserves a mention. It's recently been reprinted with 140 pages added (making it about 375 pages now) and the title has been changed to Chess Tactics From Scratch. It's unlike any other book on tactics.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #63

    DaBigOne

    The mammoth book of chess

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #64

    jesterville

    Some great books being shared here. I am taking notes. Thanks everyone.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #65

    AndyClifton

    mldavis617 wrote:
    Edward Lasker was a strong master but not related to Dr. Emanuel Lasker.  

    Actually, he was related to him (they were like eighth cousins or something).  And Eddie was also that rarest of all things:  a master of both chess & checkers/draughts.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #66

    royalbishop

    jesterville wrote:

    Some great books being shared here. I am taking notes. Thanks everyone.

    I had the same problem about a month ago.

    Wanted to know if there was a book on how i can pay for all these books i wanted that was posted here.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #67

    mldavis617

    AndyClifton wrote:
    mldavis617 wrote:
    Edward Lasker was a strong master but not related to Dr. Emanuel Lasker.  

    Actually, he was related to him (they were like eighth cousins or something).  And Eddie was also that rarest of all things:  a master of both chess & checkers/draughts.

    You are probably right with a somewhat uncommon last name, however in the Chess Secrets book I cannot find any reference where Edward claims a relation.  He calls himself a "namesake" and they were friends after the young Edward began to immerse himself in chess.  No matter.  Thanks for the information.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #68

    DrFrank124c

    royalbishop wrote:
    jesterville wrote:

    Some great books being shared here. I am taking notes. Thanks everyone.

    I had the same problem about a month ago.

    Wanted to know if there was a book on how i can pay for all these books i wanted that was posted here.

    Many of these books are in the public domain, which means they can be obtained for free on the internet-- check out www.archive.org  also check out Goodle Play. I have found books by Capablanca, Lasker and other masters available free.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #69

    royalbishop

    DrFrank124c wrote:
    royalbishop wrote:
    jesterville wrote:

    Some great books being shared here. I am taking notes. Thanks everyone.

    I had the same problem about a month ago.

    Wanted to know if there was a book on how i can pay for all these books i wanted that was posted here.

    Many of these books are in the public domain, which means they can be obtained for free on the internet-- check out www.archive.org  also check out Goodle Play. I have found books by Capablanca, Lasker and other masters available free.

    LIke Bootleg DVD's and the author gains no profit. I heard in many cases a virus maybe your treat also. "That is what i heard"

    I like to have the book in my hand and read it...... whenever i wish. Plus i know what i am reading is from the source and not false info. Months later i can pick the book up and reread it without going online or sell it.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #70

    mldavis617

    I believe that most of the "free" online books are those whose authors have died and are out of copyright and in the public domain.  I have a couple which are PDF files and while I can use them, a book is much more easily transported to a table with a chessboard than having the text viewed on-screen.  I don't own a "tablet" which may be more easily used for study with a board, but books are easily shelved and retrieved and bookmarked for reference.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #71

    AndyClifton

    From wikipedia:


    [Edward Lasker] was friends with former World Champion Emanuel Lasker. Edward wrote in his memoirs of the New York 1924 tournament as published in the March 1974 edition of Chess Life magazine: "I did not discover that we were actually related until he (Emanuel Lasker) told me shortly before his death that someone had shown him a Lasker family tree on one of whose branches I was dangling." In a February 8, 1973 letter to Robert B. Long, Lasker explained their exact relationship:[7]

    The genealogy, incidentally, indicates that the common forbear of Emanuel and myself was the son Samuel Lasker of the Rabbi of the Polish village Łask, whose name was originally Meier Hindels. However, later the additional name Lasker was given to him to distinguish him from another Meier Hindels also living in Lask. Samuel Lasker moved to another Polish village, Kepno, in 1769, after it had been captured by Frederick the Great and became a German township, and I am the last descendant of his who was born there. He was the greatgrandfather of my greatgrandfather. His first-born son left Kepmen [sic-Kempen] and moved to Jarotschin, another Polish village, and Emanuel Lasker was that one's greatgrandson.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #72

    prateek222

    me 1 gem khelta bhu or sistem  5 minit rukne ko bolta hai

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #73

    nimzovitch2013

    AndyClifton wrote:

    From wikipedia:

     

    [Edward Lasker] was friends with former World Champion Emanuel Lasker. Edward wrote in his memoirs of the New York 1924 tournament as published in the March 1974 edition of Chess Life magazine: "I did not discover that we were actually related until he (Emanuel Lasker) told me shortly before his death that someone had shown him a Lasker family tree on one of whose branches I was dangling." In a February 8, 1973 letter to Robert B. Long, Lasker explained their exact relationship:[7]

    The genealogy, incidentally, indicates that the common forbear of Emanuel and myself was the son Samuel Lasker of the Rabbi of the Polish village Łask, whose name was originally Meier Hindels. However, later the additional name Lasker was given to him to distinguish him from another Meier Hindels also living in Lask. Samuel Lasker moved to another Polish village, Kepno, in 1769, after it had been captured by Frederick the Great and became a German township, and I am the last descendant of his who was born there. He was the greatgrandfather of my greatgrandfather. His first-born son left Kepmen [sic-Kempen] and moved to Jarotschin, another Polish village, and Emanuel Lasker was that one's greatgrandson.

    And I thought chess confusing. 


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