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Top 10 Chess Books to Own


  • 9 months ago · Quote · #121

    ek2112

    Agree with baddogno Dan Heisman's list is a good place to start.

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #122

    Alec92

    beebejoe wrote:

    What are your top 10 chess books that are worth buying?

    Thanks

    KarlsBad 1907 by Georg Marco and Carl Schlechter (one of the greatest tournament books ever)

    My System by Aaron Nimzovitch (new edition 2006)

    De Labourdannais vs Mcdonald 1834 by Cary Utterberg

    My 60 Memorable Games by Bobby Fischer

    300 Chess Games by Siegbert Tarrasch

    Laskers Manual by Emmanual Lasker

    The Chess Sacrifice Technique Art and Risk by Vladmir Vokovic

    Schlechter's Chess Games by Tom Crain

    Adolph Anderssen Master of Attack by Sid Picard

    The Life and Games of Akiva Rubinstein by Donaldson and Minev

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #123

    VM74

    I'd recommend

    Secrets of modern chess strategy by John Watson. Really loved it!

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #124

    UpstateGhost

    1. Art of Attack - Vukovic

    2. Zurich 1953 - Bronstein

    3. 200 Brilliant Endgames - Chernev

    4. The Sorcerer's Apprentice - Bronstein

    5. My Great Predecessors - Kasparov

    6. Positional Chess Handbook - Gelfer

    7. My System - Nimzowitch

    8. Logical Chess - Move By Move - Chernev

    9. Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual - Dvoretsky

    10. Anatoly Karpov's Best Games - Karpov

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #125

    PhilipCavanagh

    Top 10 chess books worth getting?

    ---

    1. Pachman, Ludek - Modern Chess Strategy (Descriptive)

    2. Bronstein, David - Zurich International Chess Tournament 1953 (Descriptive)

    3. Vukovic, V. - The Art of Attack in Chess (Descriptive)

    4. Kmoch, Hans - Pawn Power in Chess (Descriptive/Algebraic)

    5. Fischer/Margulies/Mosenfelder - Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess

    6. Polgar, Laszlo - CHESS 5334 Problems, Combinations, and Games (Algebraic)

    7. Fischer, Bobby - My 60 Memorable Games (Descriptive, you want to find the Faber and Faber version, don't trust the pathetic re-issue in Algebraic)

    8. Keres, Paul & Kotov, Alexander - The Art of the Middle Game (Descriptive)

    9. Kotov, Alexander - Think Like a Grandmaster (Descriptive)

    10. Horowitz, I.A. & Reinfeld, Fred - How to Think Ahead in Chess (Descriptive)

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #126

    PhilipCavanagh

    Oops, I fergot about 1 book I recently picked up, which I haven't read...

    Hellsten, Johan - Mastering Chess Strategy, which is the first of 3 books. Although I haven't read it, it gives decent examples of chess play, and I'm totally supporting a book like this. Thumbs up.

    BTW: Lasker's Manual of Chess was the first chess book I recieved (someone bought it for me), it's a great example of an old school chess book.

    Endgames are worth studying, other then the Hooper endgame manuals, I recommend Basic Chess Endings by Rubin Fine. Though I've skimmed through the book, Fine released 3 books on chess (Opening, Middlegame, Endgame) which was the first 3 books in the Tartan chess series.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #127

    Ziryab

    The more time I spend reading Valeri Beim, Paul Morphy: A Modern Perspective (2005), the more I become convinced that it belongs on my top ten list.

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #128

    Sho2

    And what books for the middle school bunch? I teach middle school--help me out. Thanks.

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #129

    Sho2

    I'll buy them myself. Just let me know what to buy. 

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #130

    Gregg_Erickson

    Bull_ start with endings. Openings seen so cool - but endgames win!!!!

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #131

    Ziryab

    There's a slew of books aimed at youth. Many are very good. They are most appropriate for MS/HS as the reading level remains too high for most elementary kids.

    Just avoid anything by Robert Snyder. You don't want the embarrassment of finding that you've put a book into the hand of a child that was written by a convicted pediaphile.

    Put John Walker and chess into a search at your favorite online bookstore. All of his books are suitable for middle school students.

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #132

    Gregg_Erickson

    ???

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #133

    Agogwe

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #134

    jarrasch

    Ziryab napisał:

    Put John Walker and chess into a search at your favorite online bookstore. All of his books are suitable for middle school students.

    If you deter from Snyder's books, then you should do the same about Walker's, for the same reason.

    http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2002/apr/06/childprotection.schools

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #135

    TomHaegin

    I strongly disagree with putting

    Fischer/Margulies/Mosenfelder - Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess

    in the top-ten. It is nothing but a collection of basically tactical motives and diagrams. There are at least a 100 books which do this much better. Fischer only lent his name which is regrettable. And yes, I own it and fell for the cool title.

    I strongly recommend Van der Sterren: Fundamental Chess Openings (FCO) in the list. It's from Gambit Books. You can learn a lot of ideas from it as it gives an explicative overview of all the sensible chess openings. Of course, eventually one wants to study particular openings in more detail. But as a primer, this is a most valuable book. In addition it is very well produced.

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #136

    Ziryab

    jarrasch wrote:
    Ziryab napisał:

    Put John Walker and chess into a search at your favorite online bookstore. All of his books are suitable for middle school students.

    If you deter from Snyder's books, then you should do the same about Walker's, for the same reason.

    http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2002/apr/06/childprotection.schools

    Crap. I didn't know that about Walker. There are stacks of his books in the club room at one of my schools.

    The books Yasser Seirawan did in the 1990s (Jeremy Silman was co-author on one or two) are well-suited for middle schoolers.

    I  can also recommend the exercise books by John Bain, Al Woolum, Dean Ippolito, and Todd Bardwick. These are suited to elementary players as well.

    Bruce Pandolfini's Beginning Chess and Pandolfini's Endgame Course are well-suited to players starting out at any age. You can hardly go wrong with anything by Irving Chernev (as long as you are a skeptical reader--see http://chessskill.blogspot.com/2013/02/chernevs-errors.html). 

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #137

    cornbeefhashvili

    In no particular order (except for the first book):

    1. Your First Move - Sokolsky
    2. The Middlegame (Book1) - Euwe
    3. Endgame Strategy - Shereshevsky
    4. 100 Endgames You Must Know - de la Villa
    5. Sharpen Your Tactics - Archangelsky/Lein
    6. Chess Training - Yusupov
    7. Formation Attack Strategies - Johnson
    8. How To Open A Chess Game - Evans/Gligoric/Hort/Petrosian/Portisch/Larsen/Keres
    9. One Hundred Selected Games  - Botvinnik
    10. Positional Chess Handbook - Gelfer

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