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Some Strategy


  • 6 years ago · Quote · #1

    chesster87

    Hey everyone,

    Im new, and i just started playing chess. i wanted to learn some general stratgies and rules to upping my chess skills, so i figured Id ask some of the more seasoned chess players for some general advice of things they have learned and eperienced during the game. What thought process should i be going through as the game progresses?? What should i avoid doing? what have YOU  noticed as you have sharpened your skills in chess? thanks guys :)

    -Omar

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #2

    ASpieboy

    Watch for bishops. I've lost many a piece to a discreet bishop long forgotten.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #3

    slack

    -As the game starts to open up, put your rooks on your opponents 7th row (2nd row if you play black). All kinds of tactical plays can be made when your rooks control that row.

    -Try to keep a pawn on either d4 or e4 (d5/e5 for black). At the very least, try to attack those squares.

    -Know the value of each piece, and make sure all of them are defended. Bishops and Knights are generally worth 3 pawns, Rooks 5, and the Queen is worth 9.

    -Look for pins. Pins and piece value are linked. For example, if a knight is pinned to the queen by a bishop, the knight can't move because the bishop would capture the queen and it would not be an equal trade of material. Pins are such a crucial part of chess.

    -Time, or tempo, is the other important concept in chess. Some moves will make your opponent respond directly, like putting the king in check. Either the threat has to be removed, or the king has to move to safety. Generally, with the Queen the same is true. When a minor piece or a pawn attacks a queen, your opponent will respond directly and move the queen. Use that to your advantage.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #4

    KillaBeez

    Make sure you are not hanging any pieces.  Doing this alone can boost your rating so much.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #5

    steelfire

    watch for forks by knights. They are so deadly.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #6

    steelfire

    Oh yeah, one strategy i recently founde out and works pretty well is this, if not possible, use bishop to take f7. The strategy is to lure the king out.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #7

    chesster87

    slack wrote:

    -As the game starts to open up, put your rooks on your opponents 7th row (2nd row if you play black). All kinds of tactical plays can be made when your rooks control that row.

    -Try to keep a pawn on either d4 or e4 (d5/e5 for black). At the very least, try to attack those squares.

    -Know the value of each piece, and make sure all of them are defended. Bishops and Knights are generally worth 3 pawns, Rooks 5, and the Queen is worth 9.

    -Look for pins. Pins and piece value are linked. For example, if a knight is pinned to the queen by a bishop, the knight can't move because the bishop would capture the queen and it would not be an equal trade of material. Pins are such a crucial part of chess.

    -Time, or tempo, is the other important concept in chess. Some moves will make your opponent respond directly, like putting the king in check. Either the threat has to be removed, or the king has to move to safety. Generally, with the Queen the same is true. When a minor piece or a pawn attacks a queen, your opponent will respond directly and move the queen. Use that to your advantage.


    well that seems like a pretty interesting method, using the rooks like that . what way would you suggest that i do that. is there a special name for that opening?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #8

    Plasmic

    chesster87 wrote:
    slack wrote:

    -As the game starts to open up, put your rooks on your opponents 7th row (2nd row if you play black). All kinds of tactical plays can be made when your rooks control that row.

    -Try to keep a pawn on either d4 or e4 (d5/e5 for black). At the very least, try to attack those squares.

    -Know the value of each piece, and make sure all of them are defended. Bishops and Knights are generally worth 3 pawns, Rooks 5, and the Queen is worth 9.

    -Look for pins. Pins and piece value are linked. For example, if a knight is pinned to the queen by a bishop, the knight can't move because the bishop would capture the queen and it would not be an equal trade of material. Pins are such a crucial part of chess.

    -Time, or tempo, is the other important concept in chess. Some moves will make your opponent respond directly, like putting the king in check. Either the threat has to be removed, or the king has to move to safety. Generally, with the Queen the same is true. When a minor piece or a pawn attacks a queen, your opponent will respond directly and move the queen. Use that to your advantage.


    well that seems like a pretty interesting method, using the rooks like that . what way would you suggest that i do that. is there a special name for that opening?


    It's not an opening, rather a good place for your rooks to be in the endgame. Here, they can make attacks on the enemy king and harass the pawns in the area. It's one of those general chess strategies really, get your rooks onto the seventh if you can.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #9

    chesster87

    KillaBeez wrote:

    Make sure you are not hanging any pieces.  Doing this alone can boost your rating so much.


    lol If only I had taken your advice. I was about to win a game but in my excitement I overlooked a knight :( This cost me the queen, the game, and my dignity.  Next game ill keep in mind what KilllaBeez once told me haha 

    Thanks

    -Omar

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #10

    KillaBeez

    Another addition to this advice is to make sure all of your pieces are protected.  This will prevent some tactics to exploit the hanging piece.  Just work on tactics and learn not to hang pieces.  Because if you don't make very many mistakes, your opponent will likely make some mistakes.  This is not an ideal way to play chess and soon you will have to learn how to outplay your opponent, but this can improve your game a lot in the short term.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #11

    rina01

    interesting


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