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1 f4 is it playable ?


  • 15 months ago · Quote · #81

    dodgecharger1968

    chiaroscuro62 wrote:

    4 b3 in the above positions is the well known "Chiaroscuro gambit".  It is somewhat tactically unsound, but positionally very deep.  If you can make it through the ensuing tactical complications, you are likely to have a sizable plus. 

    Because you have an opponent who overlooks forced wins?  lol, that is a plus...

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #82

    mic15counterstrategy

    This is suicide for lower rated players, I think you have to have an 1700/1800 + rating to play this.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #83

    chiaroscuro62

    dodgecharger1968 wrote:
    chiaroscuro62 wrote:

    4 b3 in the above positions is the well known "Chiaroscuro gambit".  It is somewhat tactically unsound, but positionally very deep.  If you can make it through the ensuing tactical complications, you are likely to have a sizable plus. 

    Because you have an opponent who overlooks forced wins?  lol, that is a plus...

    Well, I did say there were complications...

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #84

    stringerbill

    I play f4 going into a stonewall attack. By playing f4 I avoid benoni.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #85

    pps1

    check krammnik vs adams 2005 sofia both played the most played moves the most precist in the middlegame and ended in draw i play c5 vs e4 but if my opponet is rated higer then me i just play e5 and draw in 30 moves

    Irontiger wrote:

    pps1 wrote:

     

    Lol. You must be a very strong player.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #86

    dodgecharger1968

    mic15counterstrategy wrote:

    This is suicide for lower rated players, I think you have to have an 1700/1800 + rating to play this.

    Disagree 100%.  Anyone can learn the opening moves (sure, you can't screw them up, but then, Giouco Piano will get you scholar-mated if you screw up the moves, so...), and the middlegame strategy is simple and straightforward.  I never understood anything subtle that was happening in a chess game until I learned this opening.  It's an excellent springboard to understanding better openings, and chess in general.


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