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1.g3


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #1

    Samsch

    Only respond to this if you play 1.g3 is real, long time control games.

    Ok, so which line do you like the best as white? Why do you? What are some ideas in that line?

    Line #1

    Line #2

    Line #3

    Ok, so what is the best line for white after 1.g3 1...e5? Are there any good lines that I missed? (Besides, other obvious developing move lines that I did'nt have time to put in, like Nc3 at some point or something like that.) Is 1.g3 1...e5 2.d4 playable?

    Thank you for reading, and please respond if you can.



  • 2 years ago · Quote · #2

    ClemsonTiger

    I have played line 2 with white and prefer it...I also enjoy playing 1 b3 as well

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    Samsch

    coneheadzombie wrote:
     

    Are you talking about the KIA?

    That's a well-respected line of course, I was talking about sidelines though.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #5

    Samsch

    pfren wrote:

    #2 is the most natural plan, both the others have flaws.

    #1 allows 3...d4, which is quite strong when Black has not already committed himself to c7-c5.

    #3 is actually worse than the analogous tempo-down reversed Alekhine variation, since after 5...c4 6.Nd4 Bc5 Nc6 (or Nf6) the bishop is not at all happily placed on g2.

    In line #1 if d4, can't d3 be played and white can keep developing?

    and in your line #3 comment, that does'nt make sense, white would put his knight on c3 for no reason and lose it!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #6

    Samsch

    hessmaster wrote:

    line 3, like pfren said, is a reversed alekhine where g3 and bg2 might be useless depending on what line black chooses. i like nf3 first, since you can dodge e5 systems.

    Ok, sure.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #7

    blueemu

    One interesting way of handling the King's side fianchetto opening (after either 1. g3 or 1. Nf3 and a later fianchetto) when Black plays an early ... e5 is to play d3 and c3, and after developing a few pieces and castling, to follow up with b4, a3 and e4, aiming for a transposition into a colors-reversed Ruy Lopez Breyer defense. I've had pretty good results with that general opening plan.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #8

    Samsch

    blueemu wrote:

    One interesting way of handling the King's side fianchetto opening (after either 1. g3 or 1. Nf3 and a later fianchetto) when Black plays an early ... e5 is to play d3 and c3, and after developing a few pieces and castling, to follow up with b4, a3 and e4, aiming for a transposition into a colors-reversed Ruy Lopez Breyer defense. I've had pretty good results with that general opening plan.

    Ok, cool! That sounds pretty good.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #10

    Samsch

    pfren wrote:
    Samsch wrote:
    In line #1 if d4, can't d3 be played and white can keep developing?

    and in your line #3 comment, that does'nt make sense, white would put his knight on c3 for no reason and lose it!

    Sure. But Black will continue with 4...Nf6 (or even provocatively with 4...Nc6 inviting white to take that knight) and leave his pawn on c7. This reversed Schmidt Benoni has very little punch for white, if any.

    About #3, quite right. It was a typo (a missing move), fixed.

    Ah, ok.

    Thanks.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #11

    Vyomo

    Samsch, I like this, but I would advocate the Barcza: still fianchettoing the bishop, but better pawn structure AND Development.

    Enjoy the lines!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #12

    Samsch

    Vyomo wrote:

    Samsch, I like this, but I would advocate the Barcza: still fianchettoing the bishop, but better pawn structure AND Development.

     

    Enjoy the lines!

    Nice :)

  • 8 months ago · Quote · #13

    InspiredSquare

    I like the idea of 1.g3 and if 1...e5, following it up with 2.c4, preventing 2..d5, and taking up some space in the middle.

    But Vyomo with 1. Nf3, preventing 1..e5 right away  makes a lot of sense to me.  


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