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A book for the queen's indian ?


  • 14 months ago · Quote · #1

    apostolis1

    Hello everyone ! 

    Can you suggest me a nice and simple book for the queen's indian ? (repertoire for black)

    I would like to learn the main line but also the most common variations ! Can you help me ? 

    Thank's in advance

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #2

    PawnMayhem

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #3

    moonnie

    I am lazy so I normally use opening DVD's

    • Under 1600 rating do not bother you wont understand the concepts of a complex opening like queens indian. You will win more games by just developing your pieces and learning tactics
    • 1600-2000 I recommand the queen indian the easy way from Jacob Asgaard. These DVD's are mostly about the concepts and ideas behind the opening and not so much about the move orders (your opponents wont follow move orders anyway). This DVD clearly explains the ideas and setups behind all important queen indian variations.
    • 2000+ you might want to want a bit more body and actual variations. Your opponents will be better booked and the need for concrete moves instead of ideas increases (please not that learning the moves without the ideas is senseless). You could look into the DVD of Tiviakov. It is a good dvd with an interesting rep. but tiviakov goes trough the moves with the speed of an intercity and does not give many details behind the ideas of certain moves (he assumes you already know them

    You can find the DVD's on chessbase or any other chess shop

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #4

    Redglove6

    Starting out: the queen's indian is pretty easy to follow.  Don't get Andrew Greet's play the Queen's indian.  Very hard to follow.  There's not a lot of video material here on chess.com.   Good luck....this is not an easy opening to learn.  I am struggling. 

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #5

    SmyslovFan

    One of my favorite books is Queen's Indian: Kasparov System by Mikhail Gurevich. This book only covers one key variation, but it does so brilliantly, with exercises, discussions of tabiyas, and so on. For a general book on the QID tho, you may have to look elsewhere. 

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #7

    SmyslovFan

    Yeah, I have that one too, Reb.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #8

    Cogwheel

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 9 months ago · Quote · #9

    Ambassador_Spock

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  • 9 months ago · Quote · #10

    gundamv

    There was an older book by Oleinikov that I heard was OK

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #11

    ThrillerFan

    Some of the books mentioned are severely dated.  I'd recommend the one by Andrew Greet.  I have it, and it's well written, but I don't use it much as I no longer play the Queen's Indian (or any Indian Defense for that matter).

    I hope you are not studying this figuring this to be the only opening you play.  After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3, 3...b6 is a horrible move, and defeats the whole purpose of the defense.  You would need to play 3...d5 or 3...Bb4 against 3.Nc3.

    The only reason 3...b6 works against 3.Nf3 is that 3.Nf3 does nothing to promote the e4 push by White.  After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 b6? 4.e4!, White's better.

    Assuming your other line of defense with the Queen's Indian would be the Nimzo-Indian, Emms's move by move book may be ok, but Dearing's book from 2005 is probably still the best one written in the 21st century.

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #12

    MrBlunderful

    I have no experience with it, but Peter Wells did a QID book for the "Chess Explained" series.  And what I can say is that Wells is an exception writer, especially from the perspective of explaining ideas, and that the CE series is pretty solid for that same reason, too.

    And while I certainly appreciate Thriller's perspective, I do think he tends to assume most of us are playing against master level competition. :)

    In the club ranks, you still need something against 1.d4 2.c4 3.Nc3, but the QID is much more of a repertoire builder than the Nimzo for most, because its solidity and the ideas inherent in it tend to make its basic structure really effective against most of white's d-pawn specials and offbeat tries, too.

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #13

    ThrillerFan

    MrBlunderful wrote:

    I have no experience with it, but Peter Wells did a QID book for the "Chess Explained" series.  And what I can say is that Wells is an exception writer, especially from the perspective of explaining ideas, and that the CE series is pretty solid for that same reason, too.

    And while I certainly appreciate Thriller's perspective, I do think he tends to assume most of us are playing against master level competition. :)

    In the club ranks, you still need something against 1.d4 2.c4 3.Nc3, but the QID is much more of a repertoire builder than the Nimzo for most, because its solidity and the ideas inherent in it tend to make its basic structure really effective against most of white's d-pawn specials and offbeat tries, too.

    And here inlies the problem at the Club level.  Everybody seems to want to play one opening, picked from Random, and thinks it can be used against anything.  While MrBlunderful acknowledges that you need something after 1.d4, 2.c4, and 3.Nc3, many don't know that.  Another common scenario is the King's Indian Defense.  People are like "I'll just play a King's Indian Setup against everything except 1.e4".

    The main problem with this is that these players are memorizing moves based on a book, and aren't learning the opening phase of the game the way they should be learning it, and that's via opening concepts, NOT either opening theory (most of the time your opponents will be out of book early anyway) or just parroting moves (in this case you are making moves because you've used the same structure before, but you have no clear understand of what is actually going on).

    By studying opening concepts, you should be basing your moves not on opening name, but on idea.  White opens 1.d4.  Black says "I'm going to try to prevent e4, giving White the big center."  Ok, so that gives him 3 options.  1...d5, 1...f5, or 1...Nf6.  He shouldn't care whether 1...f5 is called the Dutch (which it is), Turkish Defense, Coke-Sniffing Defense, Toilet Bowl Defense, whatever.  Who cares?  He's preventing e4 by White.  You decide you want to develop a piece, so you play 1...Nf6.

    So now you have 1.d4 Nf6, White sees that e4 is prevented, so he plays c4, to control central squares.  You see that you will not get in e5 any time soon, and so since e6 is a move you are going to play anyway, and White has no threat, you decide to play it.  Now White plays 3.Nc3.  Ok, now Black should be saying to himself "White threatens to get in e4, the very move I'm trying to prevent!"  So Black asks himself "What moves prevent e4?"  The Knight already blocks the f-pawn, so that's not an option.  The Bishop can't get out to b7 or f5.  So that leaves two options.  Stop it directly with 3...d5 (another black piece that will control e4, taking a "2 to 1" lead over White) or indirectly with 3...Bb4, making White's Knight useless at covering e4 as the Knight is pinned to the King.  There is no need to actually take the Knight until White hits the Bishop with a3, or until White gets enough pieces covering e4.  Black will try to set up more pieces to control e4 while White tries to get castled, so that Black doesn't have to take on c3 unless provoked.

    So at the club level, instead of building a repertoire, try building a knowledge base of learning how pieces coordinate together.  Don't think of it as a certain sequence of moves.  Think of it as a specific plan.  While Experts like me and Masters like Carlsen think of 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 as the "French Defense", club players should think of it as "Black takes over control of e4"  1.e4 e5 "Black prevents the e4-d4 central pawn mass by White"  1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 "Black harasses e4 to remove the central pawn mass - unlike 1...e6, the Light-Squared Bishop isn't Blocked, but in addition, the Dark-Squared Bishop will be slower getting out".

    Until you are at least 1800 over the board, a club player should take on this mentality, and not that of "Repertoires" or "Opening Names" or "Theory".

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #14

    dtrossen

    ThrillerFan wrote:

    Some of the books mentioned are severely dated.  I'd recommend the one by Andrew Greet.  I have it, and it's well written, but I don't use it much as I no longer play the Queen's Indian (or any Indian Defense for that matter).

    Note that this book is relatively advanced though (at least in my opinion, coming from USCF class A level).  I prefer Starting Out: The Queen's Indian by Emms, which I think would be more appropriate until expert rating level.  It is around 150 pages and keeps things high-level, so you can spend time on more important things like tactics and endgames.

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #15

    apostolis1

    [COMMENT DELETED]

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