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Anti-Sicilian question


  • 17 months ago · Quote · #1

    EnemyGenerator

    People of chess.com I have got a question. As a sveshnikov player I've encountered the move order 1.e4-c5 2.Nc3-Nc6 3.Nf3( or Nc3 and Nf3 reversed) new as a sveshnikov player I need to play 3. e5 and white usually plays 4.Lc4

    I was wondering if there's a book that covers the line because I've had some problems lately with not being able to equelize comfortably because of wihite's sounder structure.

    any help would be super greatly appreciated

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #2

    EnemyGenerator

    and 3.e6 wanting to go to the two nights afther 4.d4 is not an option as I don't want white to have other options than just transposing

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #3

    Xiaozu

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #4

    Xiaozu

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #5

    EnemyGenerator

    well if I'm not mistaken 4.Lb5 leads to a sideline of the rosselimo were white with perfect play should gain an advantage

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #6

    TetsuoShima

    i thought sveshnikov is with pawn on to e5 and hole on d5

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #7

    Xiaozu

    EnemyGenerator wrote:

    well if I'm not mistaken 4.Lb5 leads to a sideline of the rosselimo were white with perfect play should gain an advantage

    4.Bb5 does simply transpose to a line of the Rossolimo, but like all anti-sicilians, black has absoloutely nothing to fear and has many options to fight for the advantage. The recent candidates game Carlsen-Radjabov was a Rossolimo, guess which colour/player was extremely lucky to escape with a draw?!

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #8

    kikvors

    I wonder why Carlsen played it then. Or Anand, in his world championship match and with a team of analysts working for him. Perhaps it's not that simple?

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #9

    Ferric

    EnemyGenerator wrote:

    People of chess.com I have got a question. As a sveshnikov player I've encountered the move order 1.e4-c5 2.Nc3-Nc6 3.Nf3( or Nc3 and Nf3 reversed) new as a sveshnikov player I need to play 3. e5 and white usually plays 4.Lc4

    I was wondering if there's a book that covers the line because I've had some problems lately with not being able to equelize comfortably because of wihite's sounder structure.

    any help would be super greatly appreciated

    I think this is ECO B-29 Nimzowith var.  Beside  4.e5?

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #10

    Xiaozu

    kikvors wrote:

    I wonder why Carlsen played it then. Or Anand, in his world championship match and with a team of analysts working for him. Perhaps it's not that simple?

    I didn't mention anything being simple apart from it being a transposition. I just mentioned that there's nothing to fear, (at this level or at any level) the position offers the chance for black (or white) to fight for an advantage. Why did Anand choose it for his WC Match, I don't know... but did he actually win with it in the normal classical games?

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #11

    EnemyGenerator

    in Carlsen Radjabov the move order was 1.e4-c5 2.Nf3-Nc6 3.Bb5-e6

    with the idea of bringing the night to e7 and so you could say that 3.Nf6 is less accurate then. you could say its just another line but if I'm right an early Nf6 in the Rosselimo is regarded as inaccurate. I also want to point out that the Rosselimo is even according to the worl elite the most sirious anti sicilian and definantly a try for an advantage. 

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #12

    Xiaozu

    EnemyGenerator wrote:

    in Carlsen Radjabov the move order was 1.e4-c5 2.Nf3-Nc6 3.Bb5-e6

    with the idea of bringing the night to e7 and so you could say that 3.Nf6 is less accurate then. you could say its just another line but if I'm right an early Nf6 in the Rosselimo is regarded as inaccurate. I also want to point out that the Rosselimo is even according to the worl elite the most sirious anti sicilian and definantly a try for an advantage. 

    Actually you can be regarded as completely wrong. Nf6 in the Rossolimo is anything but inaccurate.

    Why?

    The mainline Rossolimo involves involves a knight on f6 and a kingside fianchetto.

    Do me a favour, before making widely inaccurate claims about an opening, do a bit more research first... please...

     

    As for the Rossolimo being a try for the advantage?

    Go ahead and play it as white and see how you feel. If it's good for you, stick with it =)

    I have tried it from both sides of the board and always felt better with black. Maybe that's because (in general) i enjoy having the long-term positional trump of the bishop pair in a semi-open position.

    But whatever floats your boat is good for you.

    In your first post you asked about help regarding moves (for black) that render Nc3 before d4 harmless while keeping open the opportunity of a transposition into a Sveshnikov. I pointed out that Nf6 is the only move that keeps open this opportunity.

    Now you can't shut up about the Rossolimo being this golden bullet holding a lasting advantage and Nf6 being inaccurate!! Jeez thanks.

    Like i said go and play it, see what you think.


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