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Benko's Opening


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #1

    Data_Pillars

    I'm very interested in the Benko's opening, (1.g3) and I was wondering if some1 could plz tell me about the theoory and ideas in the opening.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #2

    masteryoda

    yes some people can.

    unfortuanately, i am not one of those people

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #3

    mcfischer

    Data_Pillars wrote:

    I'm very interested in the Benko's opening, (1.g3) and I was wondering if some1 could plz tell me about the theoory and ideas in the opening.


    its highly transpositional. it would depend on what positions youre looking to go to.

    all in all I like it. if youre a fan of fianchettod bishops and a safe king you should be right at home. the only reason it is not more popular is that it doesnt exert whites first move advantage on to black by force... but at a lower level I see no problems with it

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #4

    nimzovich

    Writing a summary on this (or any?!) opening would take more than a few postings, if done well, and would never take place of studying complete games.

    Consider starting with reviewing Benko-Fischer and Benko-Tal from Curacao, 1962.

    As noted by mcfischer, the transpositional possibilities are incredible, and depend not only what white but also where black is aiming.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #5

    Conquistador

    The only drawback to 1.g3 as opposed to 1.Nf3 is that it is very committal.  This allows black the option of 1.g3 e5 which is probably black's strongest counter.  Overall, it is a fine opening if you like something simple.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #6

    Estragon

    The strongest player ever to use this opening regularly at the highest level was Larsen, who dominated tournament chess from the time of Fischer's withdrawal from the Sousse 1967 Interzonal to his return in 1970, at one point winning five tournaments in a row.  Even Fischer agreed Larsen deserved to play Board 1 in the first "USSR v The Rest of the World" match in 1970.

    Larsen usually attempted to draw the center pawns forward if Black reacted straightforwardly, and so 1 g3 e5  2 Bg2 d5  3 Nf3 looking for something of an Alekhine's Defense Reversed.

    In any case, his games are well worth close study if one intends to adopt 1 g3.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    stockportpawnpusher

    To my mind the main advantages of 1g3 are psychological. We've all got a defence to 1e4 we know well and some of us have a defence to 1d4 as well. After 1 g3 Black has a vast array of replies but will he get a position he understands and is comfortable with?. I guess one of the main questions for Black is whether he is happy after 1g3 e5 2c4. Personally I wouldn't try the reversed Alekhines type positions as I feel they require great accuracy from White.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    Data_Pillars

    I actually think I'd be decent at handling the Alekhine's Defence Reversed, as the Alekhine is one of my main defences against e4 :)

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #9

    EvgeniyZh

    What do you think about 2... d4?

    E.g. 1. g3 d5 2. Bg2 d4

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #10

    Xanxi

    Hi.

    I am interested too in studying the Benko g3 opening. Is there a good book to read?

    Best regards?

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #11

    Maybe_Player

    Xanxi wrote:

    Hi.

    I am interested too in studying the Benko g3 opening. Is there a good book to read?

     

     

    Best regards?

    Where did you find this thread??? It's over 5 years old!!

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #12

    Xanxi

    No matter how old it is, Google ranks it on the first page.


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