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Bishop's Opening?


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    jtd200

    Does anyone play it?

    It seems to have scored pretty well for white at higher levels...  I already know a fair amount of Ruy Lopez theory, but my theory on the Petrov or Philidor isn't as strong...  I suppose it's just a matter of preference, because objectively speaking the Ruy Lopez is popular because it's strong, but does anyone play or have an opinion on the Bishop's Opening?



  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    Rubidium

    I do. One of it's main qualities is the ability to transpose to the Italian, or KGD with an early f4.

    I wish more would play it! Seems everyone is playing Roy Lopez.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    silentiarius

    The Bishop's Opening stands and falls with the the value of 3...c6. So you should look at this variation first.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    Rubidium

    I never considered c6 to be that dangerous-

    But I play Nc3 instead of d3. 


    The Paulsen defense is a defense to the bishop's opening.

    Nf6 and c6, followed by d5 are the main ideas for black. 

    Here is a nice example for black:

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1012007

    Not exchanging in the center is best, according to Gary Lane

    he gives Bb3 a lot of praise.

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1103081

    A book in this is Bishop's Opening Explained by Gary Lane.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    DeadheartMary

    Well, against the Bc4 Vienna, 3...Nc6 equalizes just a couple moves later.  So it's not exactly a theoretical answer.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    Rubidium

    Wow. This scares me. Is Bc4 refuted???

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    AnthonyCG

    pfren wrote:

    Unfotunately for white 3...c6 is a good move, and more than that, it has been promoted by two recent theoretical books, by Kaufmann and Sakaev.

    Kaufman suggests a modern interpretation of the variation (dropping in ...Bb4+ before putting the bishop on d6) while Sakaev does not approve the idea, and puts the bishop immediately on d6.

    I thought Nc3 was a huge problem if Black didn't play Bb4 first.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    Rubidium

    Thanks IM.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #13

    Somebodysson

    pfren wrote:

    Sakaev thinks quite the opposite in his recent Petroff book, and he is one of the best theoreticians on planet earth.

    Here Black tries to be tricky sometimes with a check 5...Bb4 +,
    aimed at preventing the development of White's knight on c3, or
    he plays 5...a5, trying to make trouble for the enemy bishop.
    However, we shall analyze Black's most solid and, I believe, best
    move, 5...Bd6.

    I know, English in the Chess Stars books are far from being good, but the analysis is almost always top notch.

    I love it. "...English in the Chess Stars books are far from being good...". I love it. Really. And I love that you really know your stuff IMpfren.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #14

    Somebodysson

    pfren wrote:

    Unfotunately for white 3...c6 is a good move, and more than that, it has been promoted by two recent theoretical books, by Kaufmann and Sakaev.

    Kaufman suggests a modern interpretation of the variation (dropping in ...Bb4+ before putting the bishop on d6) while Sakaev does not approve the idea, and puts the bishop immediately on d6.

    Impfren, by Kaufman do you mean his book on his repertoire, on openings?

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #16

    Somebodysson

    pfren wrote:
    Somebodysson wrote:

    Impfren, by Kaufman do you mean his book on his repertoire, on openings?

    Yup. The line he suggests for Black is 1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Nf6 3.d3 c6 4.Nf3 d5 5.Bb3 Bb4+ (instead of the traditional 5...Bd6, suggested by Sakaev in his Petroff repertoire book).

    To my poor knowledge, Sakaev's line is much more complex, but most probably safer. Kaufman's line has a "slight" problem, which he fails to address in his book, namely 6.Bd2! Bxd2+ 7.Qxd2, which is much less comfortable for Black than Kaufman thinks. I won't insert more details here (I have analysed this position a lot), but I do think white does have some advantage.

    I hope you realize I wasn't being sarcastic when I wrote that I respect how you really know your stuff. And thank for that Kaufman reference and the lines.  I'm going to check this stuff out. I need to learn this complex of openings, Bishops, Two Knights, Three knights, Italians, Spanish... I realize they're all different but I need to get some familirity with at least a few moves in with each of them. 


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