Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Build Your Chess Opening Repertoire


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #1

    moemen13

    Hi All,

        I was wondering; how do chess players generally build their opening repertoire?? is it a matter of choice after study, I bet consequences also may interefer sometimes.

         Then I come to the idea, that as hoppy players, we could benefit each other, by swapping our opening repertoires, explaining pros & cons to each other. That should be only general discussion with headlines. To put as much as possible headlines in one thread.

              my opening repertoire; which comes as follow:

         As White, I play d4 ( No exceptions ); well prepared for d5, with QG & occassionally I play BlackmarDiemer Gambit (1-d4 d5 2-e4 )

          As black, I play Petroff defense (1-e4 e5 2-Nf3 Nf6) & CaroKann. I reply 1-d4 with d5 as well.

          I am into strategic and positional play; as you can see, I ran away from (1-e4 ) Embarassed because of the Sicilian defense and some other complications, I am not really used to. Still, I have no rigid reason to do.

          So, what is your favorits? and why ?

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #2

    Conzipe

    I'm a type of player which really likes the positional part of chess and prefers slow positions where both sides has a lot of time to build up their strategic aims.

    I have quite a thematic main repertoire consisting of the following openings:

    Main against 1. e4:
    Sicilian: Accelerated dragon

    Main against 1. d4:
    King's indian with c7-c5.

    Main against 1. c4 and 1. Nf3:
    Symmetrical English: Botvinnik's system

    All these openings very frequently leads to similar positions and does often even directly transpose into eachother.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #3

    moemen13

    Conzipe wrote:

    All these openings very frequently leads to similar positions and does often even directly transpose into eachother.


    That is exactly, what I am talking about Conzipe. I have the same way of thinking, I like to get into more similar positions from different openings, so I feel more confortable.

        But do you think this presents a kind of weakness?? And are we missing a part of the fun in the game??

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #4

    Nomenescio

    well you have the advantage of not having many positions to remember!

     

    I play only gambits, with variations according to my mood. I'm not too serious about my opening training so I often end up a pawn down without any compensation (except opponent's overconfidence)... Anyway, i like crazy games so here it goes:

     

    white

     

    1.e4 (always) and danish, king's, Evans gambits. Against the sicilian I've some crazy lines against the najdorf that comes up most often (1.e4-c5 2.Nf3-d6 3.d4-c*d4 4.N*d4-Nf6 5.Nc3-a6 6.Rg1!? with idea of g4 and massive kingside attack)

     

    black

     

    against 1.d4

     

    albin countergambit (1.d4-d5 2.c4-e5!?) or Benko gambit (1.d4-Nf6 2.c4-c5 3.d5-b5!?)

    and King's indian def when white goes for stupid (I mean boring) systems like 1.d4, 2.Nf3

     

    against 1.e4

    italian: two knights defence which leaves black a pawn down

    spanish: schliemann defence (1.e4-e5 2.Nf3-Nc6 3.Bb5-f5!?) which often ends in complete disaster, but sometimes brings nice victories.

     

    That covers most of the games I play :)

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #5

    Conzipe

    If your a developing players it's probably not such a wise idea of creating like a permanent opening repertoire as it can (depending on how rich of different positions the openings in your repertoire is) hinder your development greatly when you will only play the same positions over and over again.

    On higher levels the problem is that you can become a very predictable player and your opponents will have an easy time preparing against you. Also the openings in your repertoire might have other drawbacks like not providing enough winning chances or work well with your current mood. So it makes sense to add a couple of different openings/variations to ones repertoire to get rid of these kinds of problems.

    Personally I don't think I'm missing out any of the fun. To me boring positions in chess are ones that are completely blown up, with pieces everywhere and you have to calculate like crazy in order to figure out what's going on and what's needs to be done. Playing these kinds of positions quickly drains energy and personally I don't find concrete calculation very fun.

    It's much more fun to play positions where you can think more freely and creatively where the value of finding the best move is not as important.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #6

    pauix

    With white, always 1.e4 (I'm starting to loose my fears against the Sicilian), aiming for a King's Gambit/Danish Gambit/Scotch Gambit. I also play the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit if Black tries to use the Scandinavian (1.e4 d5 2.d4 transposes).

     

    With black, I use the Albin Countergambit or the Grundfeld against 1.d4, against 1.e4 I still haven't got a "pet opening", against the English I use the Halibut Gambit (1...b5!? really throws off the English players) and against 1.Nf3 I play 1...c5 and improvise from here, either going for a Sicilian, Dragon variation or for something weird if 2.c4.Tongue out

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #7

    JFK-Ramsey

    Has anyone come across a good book on building an opening rep? The only advice I seem to continually come across is that it should fit a player's personality/style of playing. The books tend to either try to cover all openings and therefore lack depth or are highly specialized and lack breadth. Maybe a book that groups openings by style (agressive, conservative, etc) and/or common themes (as mentioned above). It would also be nice to find the goals of each opening such as what kind of middle game would you be striving for with that opening.

    I guess it sounds like I'm trying to avoid doing a lot of research but isn't that the intention of chess books?

    Anyone?

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #8

    moemen13

    pauix wrote:

    I'm starting to loose my fears against the Sicilian)

    Hope I will do soon ;-)

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #9

    moemen13

    JFK-Ramsey wrote:

    Has anyone come across a good book on building an opening rep? The only advice I seem to continually come across is that it should fit a player's personality/style of playing. The books tend to either try to cover all openings and therefore lack depth or are highly specialized and lack breadth. Maybe a book that groups openings by style (agressive, conservative, etc) and/or common themes (as mentioned above). It would also be nice to find the goals of each opening such as what kind of middle game would you be striving for with that opening.

    I guess it sounds like I'm trying to avoid doing a lot of research but isn't that the intention of chess books?

    Anyone?


       This is the dream book, I hope to have as well ;-)

        Generally, openings could be devided ( according to my poor knowledge ) to 4 groups :

    1- Open Games : 1-e4 e5

    2- Semi Open :  1-e4  .... other replys  

    3- Closed :   1-d4 d5

    4- Semi Closed : 1d4....  other replys. , English  & Retti

         According to your favorit play, you can pick up the right book to dig into one of these. Also, there are book written specially for players, who would like to improve their repertoire of openings; but as I think, it is not for advanced players. Only hoppy players and may be club players.

        This is a link to one of , you may check it and the feedback online

    http://www.jeremysilman.com/book_reviews_js/js_ht_build_chess_open_rep.html

    And a very nice blog post on Chess.com as well :

    http://blog.chess.com/Waldemar/how-to-build-a-chess-opening-repertoire---part-ii-your-style

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #10

    pauix

    moemen13 wrote:
    pauix wrote:

    I'm starting to loose my fears against the Sicilian)

    Hope I will do soon ;-)


    I still have problems dealing with the Najdorf and some uncommon lines, but I'm starting to get nice positions against the Dragon and the Accelerated Dragon. Also, the Wing Gambit (2.b4?!) is great to screw all the preparation a Sicilian player has.Tongue out

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #11

    Conzipe

    Depends, many sicilian players are very well booked up against sidelines like that as well Wink

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #12

    pauix

    Conzipe wrote:

    Depends, many sicilian players are very well booked up against sidelines like that as well 


    Sicilian players are very well booked up even for 2.b4, 2.Ke2 or 2.Whateveryoucanthinkof.Yell

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #13

    JFK-Ramsey

    Thanks moemen13 for your response. I have read the book reviewed by Silman but again, I guess I'm looking for a shortcut in grouping openings with similar objectives and style. Like you said, I'm afraid it is only a dream book.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #14

    Conzipe

    Well, not awesome bongcloud stuff like 2. Ke2!! but the wing gambit is actually pretty well-known and a lot of sicilian players knows that 1. e4 c5 2. b4?! cxb4 3. a3 d5! is an effective way to deal with it and is covered in most sicilian repertoire books.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #15

    pauix

    Conzipe wrote:

    Well, not awesome bongcloud stuff like 2. Ke2!! but the wing gambit is actually pretty well-known and a lot of sicilian players knows that 1. e4 c5 2. b4?! cxb4 3. a3 d5! is an effective way to deal with it and is covered in most sicilian repertoire books.


    You're talking about the Sicilian. EVERYTHING has a Name: Laughing

    http://www.chess.com/opening/eco/B20_Sicilian_Defense_King_Davids_Opening

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #16

    moemen13

    pauix wrote:

    You're talking about the Sicilian. EVERYTHING has a Name:


    Isn't it the most well studied opening ??? or I just think so!!

    I mean too much stuff about Sicilian....

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #17

    kjaisb

    I just play d4 to avoid the Sicilian altogether

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #18

    moemen13

    kjaisb wrote:

    I just play d4 to avoid the Sicilian altogether


    Welcome on board!!   It seams that more ppl have the same issue with Sicilian!!

    Shall we make a group or what?? Anti-Sicilian !!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #19

    Deranged

    As white I play king's pawn openings, trying to get unfamiliar positions such as the king's gambit or even positions like this:

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #20

    pauix

    ajedrecito wrote:

    1.d4 is probably the best Anti-Sicilian.


    But 1.d4 isn't as fun to play as 1.e4 for me!Wink


Back to Top

Post your reply: