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Chess openings


  • 21 months ago · Quote · #1

    Buster30

    Will soneone tell me a good opening. Thanks!!!

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #2

    Buster30

    Or suggest a good one?

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #3

    Fear_ItseIf

    the bongcloud, daeth opening or parham have been proven, almost weekly on these forums to be forced wins.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #4

    kikvors

    1.e4!

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #5

    gundamv

    Sicilian Najdorf Poisoned Pawn Variation!

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #6

    NimzoRoy

    You're going to start playing an opening some stranger recommends? Or am I missing something here? What's good for someone else may not necessarily be good for you. The great hypermodern GM Richard Reti (in his classic book Masters of the Chessboard) recommends learning open games first, semi-open next and closed games last. By open games he means Double KP Openings as White and Black whenever possible. 

    The Italian Game is good for learning many basic opening principles and less complex than the Ruy Lopez, another Double KP Opening. Maybe these blogs will be helpful (click on these links below)

    http://www.chess.com/blog/NimzoRoy/chess-opening-principles?_domain=old_blog_host&_parent=old_frontend_blog_view

    http://www.chess.com/blog/NimzoRoy/endgame-faqs?_domain=old_blog_host&_parent=old_frontend_blog_view

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #7

    Buster30

    No all I want is a decent one

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #8

    Buster30

    One that doesn't fail

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #9

    Gloomshroom

    Openings don't fail, players do :P

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #10

    Beacheng

    I am a specialized flank attacker.  While I am strictly devoted to the English Opening as white now (after reading Marin's books), I play the Sicillian (against 1.e4) or Benko Gambit (against 1.d4) as black.  The result is I am left in similar positions on either side of the board I can reason myself through, lending itself to middlegame tactics and long term endgame strategy.  Hypermodernism at its finest.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #11

    Buster30

    Lol hmm interesting

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #12

    ThrillerFan

    White:  1.d4 - Best by Test!

    Black:  The Universal System (1...d6)

        Against 1.e4 - Pribyl.  1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 c6 where 4.Nf3 is answered by 4...Bg4 (See Deep Blue - Kasparov, 1997 Round 4 where Kasparov missed a win on move 43) and 4.f4 is answered by 4...Qa5 intending 5...e5 where White usually ends up with a weak pawn on e4

        Against 1.d4 - Wade.  1.d4 d6 and if 2.Nf3, then 2...Bg4 where 3.c4 is answered with 3...Bxf3.  If 2.c4, then 2...e5.  The Queen trade lines are horrible for White (i.e. 3.dxe5? dxe5 4.Qxd8+ Kxd8 5.Nf3 f6 intending Be6, Nd7, c6, Kc7, etc).  Otherwise, you end up in a hybrid of the Old Indian and Classical Dutch.  After say, 3.d5, you have 3...f5, and you have a classical dutch with a gain of tempo (e7-e5 was played in 1 move) and White has already committed to the d5 advance.  3.Nc3 is answered with a trade on d4 and early harassment of the Queen.  3.Nf3 is answered with 3...e4 4.Ng5 f5, which is an improvement over 4...Nf6 which leads to the Old Indian lines in "The New Old Indian".

    Against 1.c4 or 1.Nf3, you have 1...d6, 2...e5, and 3...f5 if White doesn't transpose to QP openings, with a similar accelerated classical dutch setup.

    It works really well.  In over the board competition, I've played it now about a dozen times, smashing anybody under 2000, having beaten multiple players in the mid-2100s, and I literally have 1 loss (against a 2084 in a game I should have won - time trouble issues cost Black the game) and 1 draw against a 2000 player.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #13

    Expertise87

    ThrillerFan wrote:

    White:  1.d4 - Best by Test!

    Black:  The Universal System (1...d6)

        Against 1.e4 - Pribyl.  1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 c6 where 4.Nf3 is answered by 4...Bg4 (See Deep Blue - Kasparov, 1997 Round 4 where Kasparov missed a win on move 43) and 4.f4 is answered by 4...Qa5 intending 5...e5 where White usually ends up with a weak pawn on e4

        Against 1.d4 - Wade.  1.d4 d6 and if 2.Nf3, then 2...Bg4 where 3.c4 is answered with 3...Bxf3.  If 2.c4, then 2...e5.  The Queen trade lines are horrible for White (i.e. 3.dxe5? dxe5 4.Qxd8+ Kxd8 5.Nf3 f6 intending Be6, Nd7, c6, Kc7, etc).  Otherwise, you end up in a hybrid of the Old Indian and Classical Dutch.  After say, 3.d5, you have 3...f5, and you have a classical dutch with a gain of tempo (e7-e5 was played in 1 move) and White has already committed to the d5 advance.  3.Nc3 is answered with a trade on d4 and early harassment of the Queen.  3.Nf3 is answered with 3...e4 4.Ng5 f5, which is an improvement over 4...Nf6 which leads to the Old Indian lines in "The New Old Indian".

    Against 1.c4 or 1.Nf3, you have 1...d6, 2...e5, and 3...f5 if White doesn't transpose to QP openings, with a similar accelerated classical dutch setup.

    It works really well.  In over the board competition, I've played it now about a dozen times, smashing anybody under 2000, having beaten multiple players in the mid-2100s, and I literally have 1 loss (against a 2084 in a game I should have won - time trouble issues cost Black the game) and 1 draw against a 2000 player.

    GM Nikola Mitkov crushed IM Angelo Young as White in the Pribyl and his reaction to Young's opening was hilarious. 'What is he doing? He's lost!' as he sacrifices a pawn for a winning position.

    My own experiences against the Pribyl are slightly less convincing. I've scored about 75% on the Black side against players rated close to my level, and about 70% on the White side against an average rating of 2200+. Objectively if you understand both sides Black gets a pretty bad position and has effectively zero chances to win.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #14

    GreenCastleBlock

    4.Nf3 Bg4 is not as rosy for Black in the Pribyl as its proponents would have you think.  There's this bishop chase variation which can leave the second player very cramped (and trading on f3 doesn't equalize for Black)

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #15

    ThrillerFan

    GreenCastleBlock, there is nothing spectacular about your line.  It's not even White's best.  The extra tempo means a lot for Black, and White should play 5.h3 Bh5 6.Qe2 (Deep Blue played the inferior 6.Bd3) e6 7.g4 Bg6 8.h4 and Black has the choice of 8...h6 or 8...h5.  8...Nxg4?? 9.h5 drops the BIshop.

    Black will play e6 and d5 in your line, and you can never play f3 as the Black Queen will go to c7 and f3 will allow infiltration to g3.  Lines where White has allowed this entry by the Black Queen give Black the opportunity to Sacrifice in many cases, and attach White's King.

    As for you Expertise87, you keep thinking that, and then you try taking a look at games like Game 4 of the Kasparov-Deep Blue rematch (Kasparov wins if not for 43...Rf1?), Hubner - Kasparov Hamburg 1985, Topalov - Adams Dortmond 1996, and Seiriwan - B.Larsen Mar Del Plata 1981, and then try to tell me that the Pribyl is busted.

    The best line for White is 4.f4 and 5.e5, but even there, Hodgson on many instances has shown how Black maintains the balance.  And ya know what?  Even at the GM level, you can't win every game as Black.  If my opponent plays picture perfect, fine, I'll take a draw as Black.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #16

    Portishead93

    Try the Caro-Kann as black, English as white.  


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