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Could someone suggest some good oppenings for black?


  • 14 months ago · Quote · #1

    Tuvokfan

    I love to use openings. They have improved my performance considerably. But I don't know how to play any when I am playing black? I have to go free style and usually lose. Could someone help me?

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #2

    GreenLeaf14

    Try 1. ...e5 against e4 or my beloved french defence and maybe the caro kann defence ,though the latter two i suggest you use after you have a good grip of 1.e4 e5.Against 1.d4 play d5 and against 1.c4 play symmetrically... 

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #3

    ThrillerFan

    GreenLeaf14 wrote:

    Try 1. ...e5 against e4 or my beloved french defence and maybe the caro kann defence ,though the latter two i suggest you use after you have a good grip of 1.e4 e5.Against 1.d4 play d5 and against 1.c4 play symmetrically... 

    Obviously you didn't read the original post at all!

    QUOTE:  "But I don't know how to play any when I am playing white?"

    Uhm, last time I looked, 1...e5 and 1...d5 are not moves made by White.

    In response to the OP, don't go down that rabbit trail.  You are 1151 on here.  I'm assuming that equates to no more than maybe 1400 over the board (if you even play over the board at all).  You need to be worrying about more important things, like how to win with the pawn or draw without the pawn in a Rook and Pawn versus Rook ending.  How to win or draw King and Pawn versus King.  Basic tactical ideas like Pins, Forks, Skewers.  Basic strategy like controlling the center, gaining a space advantage.  Basic chess "maturity", like knowing when to play for a draw rather than a win.  If you are down a piece with little to no compenstation, play for the draw, not the win.  If your opponent really botches it, you can eventually switch gears, but don't be going for pipe dreams all the time.  Avoid "Hope Chess".  That is, "This move will work if he doesn't see such and such, otherwise, it's an absolutely useless move".  If that's the case, don't play the move.  The only time to play for a trap is if your move is still a productive move even with "best defense".

    You have a lot to worry about kid before openings...that's for sure.  Stick with your Torre against Nf6/e6 and Nf6/g6, play the Queen's Gambit against an early ...d5 from the other thread you started, and leave it at that for now.  The Torre may not give White the biggest of advantages, and the Queen's Gambit may involve some manouvering rather than fire works, but it suffices for now everything you need to know about the opening.  Once you get over 1800, then worry about it.

    I made the same mistake you did early on in 1996, and then I switched gears and read "The Inner Game of Chess" and "Bishop V Knight: The Verdict", and my over the board rating shot up to 1800 in no time.  Then I went back to studying openings when it mattered more, and now I'm over 2100 (Over the board).

    Trust me when I say you shouldn't be so honed in on openings right now.

    If the above is not enough evidence, keep this in mind.  Other 1100 players aren't going to know jack about the opening, and you'll be out of book in no time.  I've seen 1100 players play absolutely assinine bullsh*t like the following:

    Instead, get a leg up on other concepts.  For example, a common one is understanding pawn tension and piece tension.  Patzers don't understand how to handle tension.  If they see an available trade, they take it.  They don't understand the concept of leaving the tension there on the board.

    Here's an old adage:  "The initiator of any trade always loses a tempo!"

    Think about that.  Let's say White has a Rook on d1 and Black has a Rook on d8 in what is otherwise a completely open file.  White's other rook is on a1.  Black's other rook is on f8.  The d-file is the only open file on the board.  It's White to move.  If White plays Rd1xd8, and Black recaptures with his Rook, Rf8xd8, then Black has a Rook on the only open file, and White doesn't.  White can play Rd1 his next move if that square is covered by another piece, but now you still have opposing rooks on the d-file, and you just lost a tempo, and it's now Black to move instead of White.  Instead, if you make a productive Knight move, then the same burden is on Black.  If he takes on d1 and then reloads with Rd8, Black has now lost a tempo.  This is the whole concept of piece tension.  The same applies to pawn tension.  A White pawn on c4 and a Black pawn on d5, often neither side wants to take.  The whole idea is to force your opponent into doing what helps you.  Another major flaw is Bishops and Knights.  Many players just write them off as equal because they are both given the label of being worth the same as 3 pawns.  The problem is, that's their value standalone with no other factors to keep in mind.  Factor in that a whole bunch of pawns on the same color square as the Bishop turns the bishop into virtually a "Tall Pawn" and is worth nowhere near 3.  Take another position where the board is wide open with pawns on both sides, and the knight will take for ever to get from one side to the other and back whereas the Bishop can cover both sides at once.  Here, the Bishop is worth way more than the Knight.

    If all you do is study openings, and you memorize 12 moves of the King's Indian Defense, are you going to have any clue or any true understanding of what to do when your opponent avoids book on move 4 because he or she has no clue at all what they are doing?  Probably not, and so you know what that means?  You'd have no clue what you were doing at that point either, and so you gained absolutely ZILCH for spending all that time on openings.  Instead, get a leg up and study Endgames, Tactics, and Strategy!

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #4

    Tuvokfan

    Thanks for the help guys. I made a mistake in the description. I meant playing black not white.After your reply I have looked into the Caro-kann and and French Defense.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #5

    granitoman

    French defense is usually quite good.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #6

    Tuvokfan

    Thanks Granitoman!

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #7

    macer75

    You could try this:


    It's called the fried fox, i believe. It's not a very popular opening (or more precisely, a very unpopular opening), but it actually works better than it looks. Black can develop a strong defensive pawn structure, and castle artificially to protect his king.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #8

    Tuvokfan

    macer75 wrote:

    You could try this:

     


    It's called the fried fox, i believe. It's not a very popular opening (or more precisely, a very unpopular opening), but it actually works better than it looks. Black can develop a strong defensive pawn structure, and castle artificially to protect his king.

    Awesome! Could you show me a whole game of someone playing the opening.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #9

    dzikus

    Fried fox is a joke rather than an opening. You are going to loose quickly against any stronger opponent.

    If you like open game and attack play 1...e5, if rather counter-attack try French or Sicilian and if you are a good defender give a try to Caro-Kann.

    It is important to play the openings which suite your style. A tactical player would die from being bored in Caro-Kann while a quiet positional player could get heart attack in French Winawer or Sicilian.

    Try looking at various openings, see what kind of middlegame they offer and choose the one you like most. Opening explorer or mega database could be helpful at this kind of research


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