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d4 d5 f4


  • 10 months ago · Quote · #1

    Qwwq_Wq

    Hello everybody. I have almost 0% win percentage (playing as black) when white plays this weird opening. What is this opening called? And what is the best defence to all tricks that white has. Most preferably I would like an attacking continuation in which black has many options, because most of the time I play bullet. In most other type of attacks, I manage to get a playable position and then unless I play bad, I can atleast manage to get something going. But this particular opening really blocks all my thoughts and sometimes I feel like making a null move. :) It seems like there is no best move here and only after 5 - 10 moves I kinda feel like resigining coz white just attacks and attacks and attacks. Please suggest attacking replies by black which nullify all threats and instead creates positions for generating significant threats (by black).

     Here is one of my games. I blundered a whole knight but I wasn't winning anyway before that, and I was constantly racing against time.



  • 10 months ago · Quote · #2

    MacDingus

    It's the Stonewall Attack.  Wherein white's only real hope is that you'll make multiple positional blunders like playing a passive e6 line after he's already shown his cards, hemming in your c pawn with a premature Nc6, or weakening your kingside to no real effect with an early f6.

    A couple good plans would be...the kingside fianchetto as you'd see as the mainline against the Dutch Stonewall by black.  Your g6 pawn advance serves to dull the prospects of white's one dimensional attack based on the d3 Bishop, and a later Q-side bishop fianchetto will pressure his weakened h1-a8 diagonal.

    Or a sort of reversed London, where the early Bf5 pretty much lays white's plans to waste and forces him to play from early equality with a plan completely different from whatever he was hoping to do.

    Or a simple mirror-stonewall setup of your own, if you're super patient and don't mind long, dull grinds.  Pretty much gives you insta-equality and denies white the pawn levers he's assuming he'll have at his disposal.  This is probably your most insipid choice, but it's also the one that will most quickly discourage future stonewall attacks against you.

    There are more ways, but those aren't bad choices.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #3

    TitanCG

    This is the stonewall attack. It's a system where White puts pawns on c3, d4, e3 and f4 and tries for a kingside attack. The "trick" to the stonewall is knowing how to defend the cheapos on h7 and trying to get an endgame where White only has his dark-squared bishop. There is no way to attack it that I know of. You have the Black pieces after all. I like to fianchetto against most d-pawn speacials. 



  • 10 months ago · Quote · #4

    Or_theBashaKiller

    search  "stonewall legacy at youtube" very nice video series for counters against this setup .

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #5

    Qwwq_Wq

    Ok, thanks for your replies. "Stonewall", I see. Thats why its so hard to break through the center. Makes sense. I'll what I can do about it. Gonna find some materials online, now.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #6

    TitanCG

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #8

    MervynS

    My suggestions, which may not be the most sound but may be more practical in bullet:

    For this move order, try:

    The point of the above is not to allow white super-easy, no thinking moves in bullet or blitz that really saves clock time. But for longer time controls, yeah some study of these stonewalls is needed.

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #9

    Qwwq_Wq

    Is queen side castling a good idea for stonewall attack?

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #10

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    Like someone here probably said try trading off lightsqured bishops.  In such closed positions even a rook is worth less than a well placed knight.  Notice how weak the backward e-pawn pawn is.  Bishops defend weak color complexes. 

    I'd try 3...c5 before Nc6 to increase tension in the center.

    10...e5 looks worth a try to me cracking their pawn structure even if you end up losing a pawn. 

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #11

    MervynS

    For longer time controls, yes, I'd do 3...c5. But as I said, in short time controls like bullet, getting rid of a white piece that he depends on for easy, automatic moves helps.

    Besides, after 1. d4 d5 2. e3 Nc6 3. Bd3 Nb4, black can aim to play c5. I've also experienced from the black side the white kingside rook going Rf3 and then Rh3, followed by Qe1 and Qh4, or white throwing forward his kingside pawns to open lines for his/her rooks.

    Against queenside castling, white is able to move his queenside pawns forward to attack.

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #12

    TitanCG

    Qwwq_Wq wrote:

    Is queen side castling a good idea for stonewall attack?

    I don't know. One of the main problems White has is the bishop on c1. I'm not sure how you'd move it. Maybe you could try some kind of b3, Bb2 plan and castle long but this is slow and Black might be able to get play against the king over there quickly since he's usually better there. Usually White's king is safe on the kingside anyway.

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #13

    Vendry

    This is transposing into a Bird opening, Stonewall Variation. The best idea to play with this with black is to play simmetrically, I mean with the pawns on f5, e6, d5, or fianchetting on the Kingside.

    I play this opening with white but I play Something like 1.d4 (d5 or Nf6) then 2. Bg5 and my bishop is not in the pawn structure

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #14

    2mooroo

    Pau_VenV wrote:

    This is transposing into a Bird opening, Stonewall Variation. The best idea to play with this with black is to play simmetrically, I mean with the pawns on f5, e6, d5, or fianchetting on the Kingside.

    I play this opening with white but I play Something like 1.d4 (d5 or Nf6) then 2. Bg5 and my bishop is not in the pawn structure

    Once you play Bg5 you aren't guaranteed the stonewall setup anymore.

    See:

    http://www.chess.com/forum/view/chess-openings/is-there-anyway-to-make-this-work-tromp


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