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Help for OTB tournament preparation


  • 6 months ago · Quote · #1

    B-Lamberth

    I am preparing for the first game in an ongoing chess club tournament to be held throughout the winter.

    My first opponent is a very old guy; in fact he is 90+ and one of the oldest active chess players in Denmark. I remember reading somewhere that old and experienced players tend to be very strong in positional play and endgames due to routine, but weaker in tactical play and combinations due to reduced calculation skills. I am relatively good with black playing either French or kings Indian, so Ill be concentration on play with the white pieces. That has me thinking that I need to prepare a sharp opening with white where the position quickly comes out-of-the-book and will require a lot of calculation.

    And this is where I hope you fellow players will have good advice, as usual, at to what opening to steer towards. I have been looking at the Italian game, specifically the fried lever attack, but I am sure you have some of you have good advice on this or another approach.

    So, thanks in advance, all help is appreciated.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #2

    B-Lamberth

    Anyone?

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #3

    apostolis1

    So, that you say is that you want an opening which offers an attack, and at that point your oponnent would not be able to calculate the best defence. Is that right ?

    As white, I normally play 1.e4 and if 1...e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 I play the Ruy Lopez. But if you want a positions in which you will own the center and therefore you will have great attacking chances, I suggest you the Evan's gambit. I 've never played it my own, but I think it gives you great attacking chances after...

    So, I hope I helped you ! Good luck on the tournament  Smile

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #4

    hicetnunc

    If you don't know your opponent's repertoire, it's not easy to prepare effectively.

    I would just play my regular stuff, and seize the opportunity to complicate if it arises...

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #5

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    hicetnunc wrote:

    If you don't know your opponent's repertoire, it's not easy to prepare effectively.

    I would just play my regular stuff, and seize the opportunity to complicate if it arises...

    Agreed.  There's a book based off steering your opponent into lines uncomfortable for him:

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/1906454639?tag=wwwgamecolonc-20&camp=15309&creative=331449&linkCode=st1&creativeASIN=1906454639&adid=1A1XAA6XEBDC34DMM141&&ref-refURL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.chesslab.com%2Fcc.htm

    But the problem is hardly any of us are comfortable in every position ourselves.  Let's play for what we're good at instead of what we think the opponent is bad at, and if he is either comfortable or uncomfortable in such positions then so be it, everyone makes mistakes anyway. 

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #6

    B-Lamberth

    Thanks for good advice.

    Maybe Ill just look into the evans gambit and hope for the best :-)

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #7

    jphillips

    Try the King's Gambit.  The Bc4 variation.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #8

    apostolis1

    jphillips wrote:

    Try the King's Gambit.  The Bc4 variation.

    As I know, a nice line against the King's Gambit is 2...d5, which gives black nice play ! But maybe I am missing something Embarassed

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #9

    MervynS

    I'd say just play normally. For all you know, this 90+ player is highly tactical, but makes a lot of unsound positional decisions.

    You may want to check up on his chess performance in the past. You'd be in for a tough game is you see something like a peak rating of 2200 from a long time ago.


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