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help with opening ideas for smith morra gambit


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #1

    kruddy123

    hey i just want to know the  opening ideas  for the smith morra gambit?

    i want to start playing it in bits games manily and eventually in club matches when i get to know enough theory

     

    cheers 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #2

    finalunpurez

    develop faster and attack. thats what most gambits are aiming for.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #3

    kruddy123

    yeah i know that lol, i was  hoping for some replies on mainlines moves and tactics what to expect? do you play it your self?

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    VectorVictor

    I can answer the "do I play it myself" part, anyway.

    No way.

    If black knows what he's doing, he has a number of paths to equality, and it's one of those openings where HE gets to call the shots on what the game is going to be like, style- and structure-wise.  Worse, as black, he only has to know one of them.  As white, you have to be prepared for them all.  Which, you might say, is a lot like playing the Open Sicilian.

    Well, yes, except for two things.

    1.) In the Open, white has a lot more say over how the game develops, and can steer most Sicilians into comfortable waters of his own design if he so chooses.

    2.) It's just objectively stronger.  Meaning if you have to go through a lot of study and hassle either way, why not pick up the stronger lines?

    If you want to play Anti-lines, I'd choose a different one.  The Closed can be played in very aggressive, attacking style, mostly at white's discretion.  The c3 has only a couple typical structures, and can be played in a more highly tactical manner (as is true of so many IQP structures).  Even the Wing gambit, I think, is no worse (or at least not much worse) than the SMG, but is a lot easier to play.

    It's just zaniness to choose an opening where one guy accepts the gambit and you get an all-out tactics-fest, the next forces you into some kind of off-color French, the one after that has you chasing knights all over the board, and the last pushes through with the pawn and forces you to consider what to do with oddly placed pieces in exchange for a tempo.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #5

    ChessisGood

    Dynamic!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #6

    AnthonyCG

    VectorVictor wrote:

    I can answer the "do I play it myself" part, anyway.

    No way.

    If black knows what he's doing, he has a number of paths to equality, and it's one of those openings where HE gets to call the shots on what the game is going to be like, style- and structure-wise.  Worse, as black, he only has to know one of them.  As white, you have to be prepared for them all.  Which, you might say, is a lot like playing the Open Sicilian.

    Well, yes, except for two things.

    1.) In the Open, white has a lot more say over how the game develops, and can steer most Sicilians into comfortable waters of his own design if he so chooses.

    2.) It's just objectively stronger.  Meaning if you have to go through a lot of study and hassle either way, why not pick up the stronger lines?

    If you want to play Anti-lines, I'd choose a different one.  The Closed can be played in very aggressive, attacking style, mostly at white's discretion.  The c3 has only a couple typical structures, and can be played in a more highly tactical manner (as is true of so many IQP structures).  Even the Wing gambit, I think, is no worse (or at least not much worse) than the SMG, but is a lot easier to play.

    It's just zaniness to choose an opening where one guy accepts the gambit and you get an all-out tactics-fest, the next forces you into some kind of off-color French, the one after that has you chasing knights all over the board, and the last pushes through with the pawn and forces you to consider what to do with oddly placed pieces in exchange for a tempo.

    I can't agree with some of this. First off "White's say" is nothing more than where he will castle and how he will attack. Black chooses the pawn structure which ultimately decides White's options there. If White wants to attack in Yugoslav fashion then the Sveshnikov might ruin his day.

    Objectivity is fairly pointless at club level since the last one to blunder loses regardless of where White sticks his pieces.

    And the open sicilian requires tons more work than the Smith-Morra. Other than tactical shots you need to understand those pawn structures.

    How will he know what to do in the Sveshnikov if Black delays Nf6 or what if he tries Nge7?

    What if Black plays in Kan fashion and only moves pawns? What should White do? And what if Bc5?

    What if Black moves the queen out early to b6 or even a5?

    What if Black does not castle in the Yugoslav attack and meets your h4 with an h5 push instead? 

    Many players don't know these things without consulting some sort of opening manual. And even then Black can just deviate and confuse the player that just decided to memorize lines.

    At least with the Smith-Morra White's aims are fairly similar with the idea of explioting that lead in development and trying to use those active pieces to beat Black before he can get a defensible position.

    Here is my first game with it where I actually lost:

    It turns out that I missed 15.Nd5! which gives a big advantage to White. But what was Black's mistake? It was most likely Bb7. It's usually dangerous for the bishop to leave e6 undefended when Black's king is in the center. But how many players know that? It looks like Black played fine and surely enough I had a chance to lead but I missed it. Still this game does show the potential for massive attacks on the king.

    It was only after playing with the Smith Morra that I dabbled with the open sicilian and was able to find a similar idea in the Najdorf:

    Even if the gambit isn't sound it is pretty dangerous at club level to have a crazy button that forces your opponent to navigate the dangerous tactics.

    What made me stop playing it was the fact that Black could sidestep it and go into a c3 sicilian. Otherwise I'd still use it.


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #7

    1RedKnight99

    I got crushed by Smith-Morra recently:

    I also posted this in another thread.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #8

    transpo

    If you want play the Smith Morra Gambit Accepted here is one line 1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 3.Nxc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 d6 6.Bc4 a6 7.0-0 Nf6 8.Bg5 e6 9.Qe2 Be7 10.Rd1 h6 11.Bh4 g5 12.Bg3 Nh5

    The move 6...a6 is magic.  It denies White the b5 square for his N in order for his tactics to work.  With 12...Nh5 Black is going to exchange off White's darksquare B.  In that way his dark square B in cmbination with Black Q dominates the dark squares.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #9

    Shivsky

    The best way to see all the shots in an opening is to find a pgn database of "quick" under-20 move games (or filter them out via a  database) and play over them.   With the Morra, there are tons of one-two punch knockouts even between A/Expert rated players ... so this is always a treat for club players.

    Now for some real "Use the force, Luke" Jedi inspiration, I would direct you to my all time favorite "Smith Morra" article on chesscafe by Tim McGrew :http://www.chesscafe.com/text/mcgrew27.pdf

    This is instructive, inspiring and slap-on-your-head practical for any club player who is flirting with the Morra gambit :)

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #10

    kruddy123

    cheers for info guys

    so from here im going to look sligthy into sicilian c3, because if black can transpose into this.

    and then have a look of a view games  through a pgn data base, so where would i fnd that? off chessgames.com

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #11

    wbport

    Just playing around with transpo's line.



  • 19 months ago · Quote · #12

    vichu99

    i have just started to play smith morra gambit and i don't really know how to prepare it very well in one month. I have got a tournament in april and now it is end of feb. Can anyone help me and guide me for preparing smith morra gambit and please do share your experiences in smith morra gambit with me!!

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #13

    jfiquett

    I'm not sure that you need to know a whole lot of theory to play the smith morra effectively... White pretty much always plays Bc4, Nc3/f3, Qe2, Rd1, Be3 or g5, etc. w/ pressure on black's backward d pawn. 

    The things to look at are all the little traps it has... I won a 6 hour game in 11 minutes w/ the smith morra (note: I typically play 2.c3, but was having a crappy tournament and decided to spice things up).

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #14

    kikvors

    AnthonyCG schreef:
    And the open sicilian requires tons more work than the Smith-Morra. Other than tactical shots you need to understand those pawn structures.

    How will he know what to do in the Sveshnikov if Black delays Nf6 or what if he tries Nge7?

    What if Black plays in Kan fashion and only moves pawns? What should White do? And what if Bc5?

    What if Black moves the queen out early to b6 or even a5?

    What if Black does not castle in the Yugoslav attack and meets your h4 with an h5 push instead? 

     Black has about as many options against the Morra, too. The Siberian trap, the Schevening center, the ...e6/...Bc5 defence, the Chicago defence, Nge7 lines, the Taylor, the Finegold...

    With the exception that white can't opt for any quiet 0-0/Be2 or g3 lines against them, because if he plays it slow he's just a pawn down. He must go for the sharpest lines against all of them.

    (oops, replied to a 9 months old comment. So be it...)


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