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How long should Class A level players study openings per day?


  • 19 months ago · Quote · #1

    thehedgehog2000

    How should Class A level players study the opening? How many hours (or minutes) a day? How many openings should he/she chose?...

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #2

    zborg

    Since you're a bullet junkie.  Study about 30 seconds per day.

    And you'll need IM @Pfren in your threads (again), if you want more than 10 posts.  Smile

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #3

    Fear_ItseIf

    depends on strengths/weaknesses of the player. Ive got a pretty solid repertoire built now, so I dont really study them very much anymore, I only  maybe go over a line i dont feel conident with.

    But i your repertoire is a little shaky you may want to spend longer on it.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #4

    Expertise87

    I think a class A player does not yet need to worry much about openings. If you really want to, spending about thirty minutes to an hour of going through games to learn more ideas in the openings you play is not a bad use of your time. I do this as an Expert when I want to get in good shape for tournaments, and then the day of the tournament or the night before, I go through some critical lines to make sure I understand the ideas.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #5

    thehedgehog2000

    zborg wrote:

    Since you're a bullet junkie.  Study about 30 seconds per day.

    And you'll need IM @Pfren in your threads (again), if you want more than 10 posts.  

    Hahaha you're very funny.

    A bullet junkie? Serious? I suck at bullet. I'm trying to improve. I play blitz and slow games in tournaments anyway so I don't need to play slow games on chess.com. Thank you for keeping to the point.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #6

    Estragon

    Expertise87 wrote:

    I think a class A player does not yet need to worry much about openings. If you really want to, spending about thirty minutes to an hour of going through games to learn more ideas in the openings you play is not a bad use of your time. I do this as an Expert when I want to get in good shape for tournaments, and then the day of the tournament or the night before, I go through some critical lines to make sure I understand the ideas.

    Yes, study openings by studying games in them.  Most database programs can sort them this way with a very few clicks; you can reduce the number of search results by limiting for rating until you have a manageable number (I suggest 25-100 games for most lines, saved into separate DBs so you can save your analysis.  With Chessbase, you can also then merge all the selected games to form a tree game - but it is still better IMO to go over the games one by one).

    Using a rough average of 15-20 minutes per game, enough to see what is going on but not attempting deep analysis, use this as your openings training, but play over every game no matter the result, win, lose, or draw.  So 3-4 games per hour you have to spend, and over time you will begin to recognize the recurring ideas and patterns, the strategies which work or don't for both sides.

    But beyond the opening, you will have seen the middlegame strategies and even the typical endings, both of which will make you a far better prepared player than memorizing variations from a book.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #7

    Kingpatzer

    How many of your OTB game results have been directly caused by you being either tactically or stategically busted in the opening? 

    If that is one of the top 2 or 3 reasons you're losing games, then study openings till it isn't. But if it is not one of the top 2 or 3 reasons you're losing games, then don't worry about it.  

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #8

    thehedgehog2000

    Estragon wrote:
    Expertise87 wrote:

    I think a class A player does not yet need to worry much about openings. If you really want to, spending about thirty minutes to an hour of going through games to learn more ideas in the openings you play is not a bad use of your time. I do this as an Expert when I want to get in good shape for tournaments, and then the day of the tournament or the night before, I go through some critical lines to make sure I understand the ideas.

    Yes, study openings by studying games in them.  Most database programs can sort them this way with a very few clicks; you can reduce the number of search results by limiting for rating until you have a manageable number (I suggest 25-100 games for most lines, saved into separate DBs so you can save your analysis.  With Chessbase, you can also then merge all the selected games to form a tree game - but it is still better IMO to go over the games one by one).

    Using a rough average of 15-20 minutes per game, enough to see what is going on but not attempting deep analysis, use this as your openings training, but play over every game no matter the result, win, lose, or draw.  So 3-4 games per hour you have to spend, and over time you will begin to recognize the recurring ideas and patterns, the strategies which work or don't for both sides.

    But beyond the opening, you will have seen the middlegame strategies and even the typical endings, both of which will make you a far better prepared player than memorizing variations from a book.

    thanks


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