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How to bust the french defence???


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    dahal32

    Hi friends, ever since I was crippled in a match with a GM, I have been looking for a bust for the opening....

     

    I found this link which seems to claim that it actually "busts" it

    http://www.thechessmind.net/storage/chess-posts/2_be2_french_1.htm.

     

    And by the way, the opening went so painful that I rewalized that I was in no equality:

     

    So.... please help me with plausible replies trhanks in advance!Cry

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    finalunpurez

    An easy way to play to play the french would be the exchange variation. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    Kingpatzer

    6. dxc5 is probably where you went wrong. It's not a move played at the GM level and the few attempts in my database (ChessBase MegaBase 2012) score poorly. 7. Be3 is a definite error, but you were already in bad shape.

    6. a3 c4 7. Nbd2 is a typical continuation from that position.

    Grischuk has a number of games continuing 6. a3 that are worth looking at, he does very well on the white side of the French.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    dahal32

    ChristianSoldier007 wrote:

    one does not simply... bust hundreds of years of opening theory

    Then one playing the French should always thrive?! Not practical.....

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    Kingpatzer

    dahal32 wrote:
    ChristianSoldier007 wrote:

    one does not simply... bust hundreds of years of opening theory

    Then one playing the French should always thrive?! Not practical.....

    If you're going to allow the French, then you need to have a line to play against it. The Advance french is a fine choice, but you have to know the critical positions and ideas. There's not a lot of good sidelines here, there's really only 3 main ideas:

    6. a3 -- which is currently the most popular way of playing it at the highest levels.

    6. Be2 -- the old main line

    6. Bd3 -- where you better know the theory like the back of your hand 'cause it's game on :)



  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    dahal32

    Thanks guys... I was thinking..... How about the beloni with a mirror french???

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    NimzoRoy

    Get back to us when a super-GM (not some unknown nobody) announces a "bust" to the FD or any other well-estb. opening. BTW we won't be holding our collective breathes

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    Estragon

    d4xc5 can be a logical idea for White in some cases in the pawn chain, for instance in the Steinitz Attack 3 Nc3 Nf6  4 e5  Nfd7  5 Nf3 c5  6 dxc5.  White clears the d4 square, which may be a good place for a Knight, and cuts across Black's basic strategy to eventually play ...cxd4 cxd4 and focus his attack on the d4 pawn which now must be defended by pieces.

    But here all you do is help Black - with his Qb6 already, you give him an instant threat on your most vulnerable point at f2, and now White must play 7 Qe2 or Qc2 to defend it instead of developing.  You aren't being aggressive and developing your own minor pieces to generate threats, you are defending!  Black is already at least equal, and has a comfortable game.

    There was no threat on d4 yet.  If 6 Be2, d4 is attacked twice and defended twice, you can continue development as it will take some time for Black to put a third attacker in place.  But as noted above by Kingpatzer, 6 a3 is the overwhelming choice of modern masters.  Black is still okay, but White now has the additional possibility of b4 in hand, which complicates Black's task.

    Black isn't forced to play ...c4, but it is a popular alternative to release the tension and go to a maneuvering game.  Closing the Queenside isn't bad, but it does make active counterplay harder to come by.  Because of this, White has tended to score pretty well in this line.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    Michael-G

    There is no way to "bust" an opening like French defense.Your game clearly shows poor understanding of the pawn structure so if you want to play against French defense better maybe try to understand it instead of trying to find a good line against it.

        Anyone who suggests a line as a "buster" obviously doesn't understand a thing about French defense and probably very few about chess.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    eatingcake

    Am I missing something? Nepal doesn't even have any GMs.

    http://ratings.fide.com/topfed.phtml?ina=1&country=NEP

    The highest-rated player is 2127.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    dahal32

    eatingcake wrote:

    Am I missing something? Nepal doesn't even have any GMs.

    http://ratings.fide.com/topfed.phtml?ina=1&country=NEP

    The highest-rated player is 2127.

    "Nepal buddhi chal sangh" translate: Nepal chess federation is our parent for all the data as well as titles. And we HAVE more than a dozen GMs assosiated in this assosiation. The highest FIDE title Nepal has won is "FM" FM Manish Hamal(he was the first).

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    jetfighter13

    dued try the tarrarch.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    Kingpatzer

    If he doesn't want to learn 6 moves of the advance, why recommend a more theoretically deep variation?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    vulpesVelox

    :)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    jetfighter13

    well that is a good question. I like it because I don't have to deal with Bb4 now.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #16

    jetfighter13

    just like Carlsen and Nakamura playing the KG didn't Naka play that in the Tal Memorial. which considering the name you would think it would have been accepted.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #17

    Kingpatzer

    jetfighter13 wrote:

    well that is a good question. I like it because I don't have to deal with Bb4 now.

    Sure - I'm not saying it's bad. It's a great variation with a lot of things going for it. But you have to know the theory pretty deep if black goes for the 3. ... Nf6 variation, which is the most common continuation.

    Granted, a lot of black french players will bail out to a Rubenstien variation with 3. ... dxe4 or go for the 3. ... c5 playing for the less theoretical lines. But White generally won't know that before choosing to play Nbd2.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #19

    Daeru

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #20

    Kingpatzer

    pellik wrote:
    pfren wrote:

    Someone that has busted the French with 2.Qe2 is on the same league with people who have busted 1...e5 with the Parham.

    You see the (joking) connection I already made, then.

    Although in one sense Qe2 does bust the french. It doesn't win, by any means, and it's not even a very good move, but it does deter 2...d5 leading to positions which are usually quite non-french-like. Thus it "busts" black's ability to play a French. Of course black is probably a little better already after this move.

    I realize that computers aren't very good in the opening, but after:

    1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 c5 3. Nf3 Be7 4. Nc3 Nc6


    Stockfish recommends 5. Qd1 with a score of -0.28.

    I'm pretty sure that is all I need to know about that variation :)


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