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How to find the name of an opening by the moves


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #1

    hptchess

    Some openings I play I know or can find easily the name.  Then I can find out about them.  Others I cannot find.  Is there a place that lists them by the moves so you can just look throught all the 1. e4e5 2 nf3 possiblilies and so on. 

     Another post told how to find the info if you know the ECO code, but my problem is I have only the moves.  How do I translate that into the ECO code and a name.


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #2

    billwall

    I have all the opening names and ECO codes on my chess page at http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Lab/7378/chess.htm under opening.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #3

    hptchess

    Thanks a lot.  I knew I wasn't the first person to think of that.  :)

    You have a wonderful collection of information.  I appreciate the help.  Now I can see what hole I fell into a couple games ago.


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #4

    DeepNf3

    hpchess I belive you are a member of the chess hustler club, in our forum "the hall of shame" we explain how to take your games to a website (link provided) enter the moves and get the name of the opening variation and ECO code, there are some other ways like getting the online ECO chessbase database etc or ECO, MCO books etc
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #5

    stck

    Another good site is http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Chess_openings and then under "White's first move" click e4, on the next page select e5, then nf3 and there you go!
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #6

    archerfish123

    billwall - an amazing repository of information! Thanks for sharing.Smile
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #7

    Fromper

    Believe it or not, another good reference is just a generic web search. Go to google or some other search engine, and enter the moves you want to know about IN QUOTES, ie "1. e4 e5 2. Nf3" and click "search". Not only will you find out the name and ECO code for the opening pretty quickly, you'll also find lots of complete games that begin with those moves, which you can study to get a feel for how to play that opening. You'll often find games that start with those moves, but one player or the other varied in a way you wouldn't expect. So you get a more realistic view of how the opening is actually played in the real world than just studying the "book" moves recommended by grandmasters.

     

    --Fromper 


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #8

    likesforests

    "1. e4 e5 2. Nf3" and click "search".

     I do this very often myself. Smile


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #9

    horror987z

    Excuse me .would you help me i am looking for database or something of this kind to watch my pgn.can u referret one?
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #10

    likesforests

    horror, SCID is a good freeware database for storing and analyzing your games (aka pgn files). Chessbase is better but has a hefty pricetag.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #11

    Patzer24

    Yeah, billwall is amazing!
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #12

    hptchess

    Thanks for all the posts.  That really helps.  I went from thumbing through a book and maybe finding it to this vast land of opening information. 

    Thanks to all of you.


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #13

    shadowc

    You can use Billwall's incredible work! (oh man, when I saw that!!), or just ask Chessmaster... lol lol
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #14

    karlwig

    a lot of good advices here. also search for "chess openings" on wikipedia, it gives a good overview!
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #15

    ivandh

    http://www.csm.astate.edu/~wpaulsen/chess/chess.htm

    A cool website that... er, is hard for me to explain right now. But check it out.


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #16

    MartinLS

    wowser!  certainly glad I was surfing.  what a lot of information!  Thanks billwall!


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