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How to seriously annoy a chess engine


  • 22 months ago · Quote · #1

    Haiku575

    This gambit was made by one of the world's strongest humans -- if only when it came to results against computers.  Eduard Nemeth was his name, and with this opening he managed to defeat five of the best commercial chess engines in a single day. Behold his secret weapon:



    If you want to try your hand at humiliating a few chess engines, now you know how. Good luck, fellow humans, and may the Force be with you.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #2

    Haiku575

    I also would like to propose that this gambit hereby be known as the Nemeth Gambit, in memory of the person who invented it. As Black, he played 1. d4 h5 against chess engines with about the same results, though don't hold it against him. :)

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #3

    lollolbuddha

    I dont like to bring my queen out early.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #5

    lollolbuddha

    pfren wrote:

    Sorry to say that this is sheer nonsense.

    White is completely lost in the end of the diagram position. Even a patzer (leaving aside strong engines) can win with Black here.

    Yeah i agree ,looks very weak

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #6

    Haiku575

    It is a weak position. However, that is not the point; the inspiration behind this gambit is mostly due to a chess engine's inability to look ahead far enough to spot the threats against Black's King. I would certainly not recommend it against human opponents.

    And, in retrospection, perhaps modern engines will obtain better results than their ancestors. It would still be amusing to see which engines fall for it... :)

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #7

    ChessisGood

    Yeah, 7...Ke6 should hold for Black, right? BTW, Stockfish wouldn't let me play this. He chose 2...g6.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #8

    Haiku575

    Try setting up the position then. If you use the Arena GUI on Windows, press Control-B. I can't offer advice for any others, though.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #9

    Scottrf

    g6 loses the knight to Qd5 doesn't it?

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #10

    Haiku575

    Yes. Usually the chess engine prefers ... Ke6 or ... Kf6. After .... Kf6, though, 8. Qh4+ g5 usually unbalances the game enough that White wins.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #11

    Mainline_Novelty

    Scottrf wrote:

    g6 loses the knight to Qd5 doesn't it?

    If you're referring to chessisgood's post, he means : 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 g6.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #12

    Mainline_Novelty

    joeydvivre wrote:

    Um...That was more than 10 years ago.  Chess engines are a little better now.

    And, yeah.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #13

    Scottrf

    Ah yes sorry, didn't see the number 2!

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #14

    blake78613

    Playing a Nimzowitsch/Botvinnik center (White pawns on e4 and c4) is pretty effective against engines.  They have a bias  to reinforce the center, and don't realize it is blocked and all the play is on the wings.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #15

    Haiku575

    AcivilizedGentleman wrote:
     
     
    I had fritz play vs fritz in the position. White is lost.
     
     


    But that's a computer playing against a computer. The whole purpose of an anti-computer opening is that the computer doesn't get what's going on, yes? Hahaha

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #16

    Mainline_Novelty

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #17

    CHCL

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #18

    CHCL

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #19

    Haiku575

    I'm not pretending I know anything. Honest. I'm just suggesting an opening that might or might not bring down the pedestal most of us (myself included) elevate chess programs with. It may be that the top engines are immune to it, but I suspect that at least a few of the others will encounter trouble. Yes, I completely agree that it is unsound. 

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #20

    Amir169

    excuse me! when Eduard Nemeth did this?


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