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I can't find an opening I really like


  • 10 months ago · Quote · #21

    kiwi

    It's a bit like students trying to decide which course to study at university, or children trying to determine what they would like to do for a living, so much choice, all different. 

    When it comes to making important/difficult decisions, its always good to reflect and review yourself, your position, your knowledge on the subject, your approach, your strengths and weaknesses. 

    It may help to identify what kind of play you usually incoporate, in other words your style of play.

    Do you consider yourself as aggressive? Forceful?

    Or do you play for positional play?

    Do you prefer early exchanges and battle in the end game?

    Do you prefer a slower game with a build of up tempo gradually sewing tactics? 

    Do you prefer to play defensively? 

    Does your style focus on counter attacking? Traps and sacrifices? 

    By identifying your style, you can look at a few commonly played openings, assessing their approaches in the game, decide upon which best befits your style of play, confidence will only come through practice. 

    Hope this helps, its a start to finding your style of opening :)

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #22

    MrDamonSmith

    Try the Bongcloud. Look it up.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #23

    derekj1978

    Klobb wrote:

    Every time I try something new I lose big.  I don't study lines.  I have basically won with luck i guess.  What is really a good opening for someone like me?  I want to be aggressive and I do not mind trading early.  If play is too slow I get in trouble trying to make things happen because I get bored.  Can someone suggest something for my play style?

    You need a tutorial.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #24

    pieace

    have you tried googling 'opening principles'?  These are lists of 5 to 12 things to remember in the 1st few moves

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #25

    rtr1129

    Klobb wrote:

    I don't study lines.

    ...

    I want to be aggressive

    ...

    Can someone suggest something for my play style?

    "No study" and "aggressive" don't go together. You can't have both. Well, you can, but you already know what that's like.

    At your level, you don't have a style, you have a bag of weaknesses.

    The only way to get better is hard work over a long period of time. The "dominate my opponent with no effort" opening doesn't exist.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #26

    I_Am_Second

    rtr1129 wrote:
    Klobb wrote:

    I don't study lines.

    ...

    I want to be aggressive

    ...

    Can someone suggest something for my play style?

    "No study" and "aggressive" don't go together. You can't have both. Well, you can, but you already know what that's like.

    At your level, you don't have a style, you have a bag of weaknesses.

    The only way to get better is hard work over a long period of time. The "dominate my opponent with no effort" opening doesn't exist.

    Every beginner is "tactical"..."agressive" its a good way to learn.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #27

    rtr1129

    Exactly, better to do tactics problems everyday instead of worrying about openings.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #28

    derekj1978

    He should follow the list of basic opening principles, but he should have some kind of tutorial or opening course. He need to know about common opening traps, and move order. He should have some sound advice such as why it is important for beginners to accept gambits, etc. Following list of opening principles is not enough.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #29

    iamdeafzed

    Given your playing statistics (i.e. playing ratings all below 1200), the answer to what openings you (the OP) should play is "it really doesn't matter that much because you're obviously still making lots of blunders in your games."
    So more than any specific opening, you should instead follow the basic rules of good opening play (e.g. develop all of your pieces as quickly as possible, almost always castle and do so as soon as possible, assume at least some control of the central squares, avoid making too many pawn moves, etc.) and after that, mainly focus on not blundering away pawns/pieces. Combine this with some study of tactics to assist you in not being exploited (as easily) by pins/skewers/deflections/etc.

    Once you can pretty consistently follow good opening principles in addition to not needlessly blundering away material in your games, then you can focus more on what specific opening lines you want to play. And yes, I said opening lines. Because eventually, like it or not, you will have to study opening lines. But for now, you needn't concern yourself much with them.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #30

    Klobb

    Thanks for the info. Sometimes i wonder if i am ever going to be good but its just like anything else. Practice and learn fom mistakes

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #31

    I_Am_Second

    Klobb wrote:

    Every time I try something new I lose big.  I don't study lines.  I have basically won with luck i guess.  What is really a good opening for someone like me?  I want to be aggressive and I do not mind trading early.  If play is too slow I get in trouble trying to make things happen because I get bored.  Can someone suggest something for my play style?

    Judging by your games, you suffer from the same things every beginner suffers from. Lack of chess knowledge, and the illusion that youre a tactical player, that doesnt study tactics.

    Learning openings at your level is a waste.  Find 2 openings to play as white, and black.  Learn the ideas, and principle behind those openings.  Follow the advice below to get you through the opening phase of the game

     

    a. Control the center

    b. Develop your pieces towards the center.

    c. King Safety (Castling)

    d. Connect your rooks.

    Study tactics...tactics...tactics...

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #32

    nameno1had

    The more I read these posts, the more I realize you are impatient and want to brute force your wins. It doens't work that way in chess unfortunately. You seem to also only be concerned with what to do with the white piece and attack. I find that I can manage to win the majority of my games with white. It is black that I really had to look hard at what fit me and would work against knowledgeable players . I think you need to reevaluate yourself chessically. If you're truly impatient and want to force the action, go play bullet.

    If you really want to learn how to play chess, slow down, it is going to take a while and no matter what you choose, someone is going to try to throw a wrench in your plans. There is no one magical opening in which every line you play is easy and unrefutable....


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