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if i wanted to learn kings indian, which book should i read?


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    fanofjapan

    a really good book, wich offers good understanding and deep knowledge of the opening

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    bobzogby

    Think and Grow Rich.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    MrBlunderful

    "CM" Streetfighter's spam book on how to win friends and influence people is bound to have some KID info in it someplace.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    fanofjapan

    pfren wrote:

    Mastering the Kings Indian (Bellin and Ponzetto) is a good start.


     thank you verry much, but 200 pages seem a bit short for a kings indian books... you are sure it good?? because then ill buy it

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    fanofjapan

    MrBlunderful wrote:

    "CM" Streetfighter's spam book on how to win friends and influence people is bound to have some KID info in it someplace.


     well i dont need no cm book for that, if i wanted to manipulate people ill force drugs into them for 12 years against they will..

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    kwaloffer

    Does anyone have opinions on Bronstein on the King's Indian? I'm also getting ready to buy some KID books.

    As Bellin and Ponzetto's is only 7 euro at the second hand bookstore I'll buy them at, that will definitely be included, thanks (200 pages of chess book to study, that's months of work).

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    fanofjapan

    pfren wrote:
    fanofjapan wrote:
    ßpfren wrote:

    Mastering the Kings Indian (Bellin and Ponzetto) is a good start.


     thank you verry much, but 200 pages seem a bit short for a kings indian books... you are sure it good?? because then ill buy it


    There is no real "theory" in it. Just the typical KID pawn structures, and the various positional attacking and defending ideas, as well as prose abut the most common endgame patterns of the KID.

    You will definitely need some time to absorb these 200 pages- witout that knowledge there is no point memorizing theoretical variations.

    The best repertoire book on the KID I'm aware of is recent (Bologan), but it's not suitable for players rated under 2000.


     thx a lot.. i already played with the idea of buying bologan.. but im under 2000 lol... but shame you cant buy mastering the kid not inn germany...

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    Bubatz

    I'd recommend Joe Gallagher's book about the King's Indian in the "Starting Out" series of Everyman Chess. It has only 176 pages, still it is a good book to start. His later book "Play the King's Indian" is even better, even though I hate the small font which was chosen to fit it on 205 pages. 

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #12

    Ambassador_Spock

    I've heard the Bronstein one is pretty good, but I haven't read it yet.  I definitely give "Mastering the King's Indian" two thumbs up.  It divides the opening into 10 chapters on types of "centers" instead of variations.  Then it breaks them down into typical strategic and tactical themes.  Anyone interested in playing this opening on a team is encouraged to join the group 1.d4 Nf6 Indians.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #13

    kenji12

    attacking chess kings Indian defence vol 1&2 are both good books

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #14

    rdecredico

    pfren wrote:

    Mastering the Kings Indian (Bellin and Ponzetto) is a good start.

    Strongly seconded.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #15

    Ambassador_Spock

    I finally got a chance to read the Bronstein book (in spanish though).  It had a similar concept to the Bellin and Ponzetto book for learning the KID. 

    I've seen dozens of other KID opening books with just reams and reams of theory with little or no explanation.   The little prose these books contain are probably the most useful parts for someone below 2000.  Otherwise, they may be used as just reference books.


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