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Is anything better for me than the Parham?


  • 2 years ago · #21

    ChessWithoutPants

    The Parham would be a far better scorer if it were more drawish.  Its winning % is only slightly worse than most other white openings.  Big problem is that with no draws, that only leaves one category in the W/D/L table to pick up the slack.

    Bigger issue by far is that the Parham is far, far worse than the stats would seem to indicate if you're not playing somebody with a pretty good chance of choosing 2...g6.  That line scores huge for white, but all others score way, way worse than average.

  • 2 years ago · #22

    The_Gavinator

    As a longtime Parham player, I can say white dominates in almost any line. It is about equal in the main line you talk about, but white still can pin the f6 knight, and to stop it, black needs to wreck his kingside.

  • 2 years ago · #23

    ChessWithoutPants

    The_Gavinator wrote:

    As a longtime Parham player, I can say white dominates in almost any line. It is about equal in the main line you talk about, but white still can pin the f6 knight, and to stop it, black needs to wreck his kingside.

    Hopeless.

  • 2 years ago · #24

    The_Gavinator

    ? In lines involving the queen white dominates, in lines involving Nh6 white dominates, and white is still good main.

  • 2 years ago · #25

    gambiteer12

    Doesn't look like white dominates in any line to me.

  • 2 years ago · #26

    The_Gavinator

    that's because dummies usually play this, going for 4 move mate. There are many other attacks other than 4 move mate, and if you are prepared white can be dominant.

  • 2 years ago · #27

    ChessWithoutPants

    The_Gavinator wrote:

    that's because dummies usually play this, going for 4 move mate. There are many other attacks other than 4 move mate, and if you are prepared white can be dominant.

    You're a 1200.  That's from a master database.

  • 2 years ago · #28

    AnthonyCG

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 2 years ago · #29

    The_Gavinator

    actually it's not...

  • 2 years ago · #31

    whatupyodog

    IM pfren i wont lie, you are pretty cool, but the parham pwns as well as the qsfl.

  • 2 years ago · #32

    jetfighter13

    whatup, chess.com has already proven the Qsfl a horrific mistake right down to Bf4 on move three

  • 2 years ago · #33

    sanan22

    I think white's best chance to get a sharp position after 1.e4 e5.

    is the scotch.. you have to keep in mind that the theory serves black as he will get a comfortable position out of the opening if he knows some theory

  • 2 years ago · #34

    ChessWithoutPants

    sanan22 wrote:

    I think white's best chance to get a sharp position after 1.e4 e5.

    is the scotch.. you have to keep in mind that the theory serves black as he will get a comfortable position out of the opening if he knows some theory

    Whereas black gets a virtual win out of the opening if he knows the theory on Qh5.

    Or a mere =/+ if he is merely competent.

    Or = as long as he doesn't outright blunder.

  • 2 years ago · #35

    The_Gavinator

    None of you all have played this, so I don't think you have the right to criticize this. I've heard the scotch from many people, how would you keep it farily aggressive after the Mieses Variation (4...Nf6).

  • 2 years ago · #36

    waffllemaster

    The_Gavinator wrote:

    yeah those you listed are sound, and perfect for drawing...

    People have enjoyed chess for centuries because it's a very rich and complex game.  Even titled players, or I should say, especially titled players wont dismiss openings like the Ruy as drawish or boring.  Chess is not easy even for world champions, it's certainly not easy for people like you and me.

    There is much more to evaluating chess positions, winning chances, advantages, etc than direct attacks.  Until you're comfortable with that idea, I don't think diving into any opening is good (much less enjoyable) for you.  It would be best to stick with the pharem (which isn't terrible, so don't jump on me people :)

    In the meantime don't stop playing and work though a book like Understanding Chess Move by Move (Nunn), Logical Chess Move by Move (Chernev), or The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played (also by Chernev).  This doesn't have to be work, it can be a lot of fun, take a whole year and pick up the book every now and then, and play a lot of games.  (The books show complete master games and give lots of good comments throughout the games, including opening, middle, and endgame).

    Because as it is, IMO, you're not asking the right questions.  Seems you view advantage strictly as a function of piece count, and who has immediate (1 or 2 move) threats.  So not only will memorizing, say, the Scotch for example, not really help you, but it won't be satisfying at all because none of the moves attack directly.

  • 2 years ago · #37

    The_Gavinator

    Yes, but at the grandmaster level, games are decided by the slightest slip. At ours, they are by major tactical errors.

  • 2 years ago · #38

    waffllemaster

    Very true!  But during a game vs a peer, I make every effort to store up any small advantage I can.  "Tactics flow from a superior position" and it's a lot easier to find a tactic when your pieces are well placed vs trying to find one when you're always on the defensive or in a bind.

    -------------

    If you want to study tactics, that will make you better and can be a lot of fun too.  I don't think trying to learn the Scotch for example will be much benefit (or fun) to you.  Just IMO.

  • 2 years ago · #39

    The_Gavinator

    Everyone makes errors, but at the highest level they are incredibly slight, at ours they can be major. An aggressive opening would be better to, exploit the errors, or make my opponent more likely to make them. The Parham is shaky ground, black can get through it solidly, but a small error will cost them the game.

  • 2 years ago · #40

    waffllemaster

    So I say go for it.  I don't think it's nearly as bad as a lot of these people are saying.  I believe it essentially loses a tempo for no reason, and I think it's important to recognize that.  But that recognized, as you say these small advantages don't win games for amateur players.

    Now it's my advice that you do yourself every favor you can, because "it doesn't kill me" is a lousy justification for a move.

    And that's about as hard as I'll be on the pharem, otherwise I completely agree, and I say (again) if you like it, play it.  The most important thing is to keep playing and learning about the game.  Memorizing the Scotch or Sicilian, or Ruy etc won't be beneficial (in the short term) or fun.


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